Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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What really happened? Sharp memories tied to brain crease

What really happened? Sharp memories tied to brain crease | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
There are two types of people in the world: those who remember everything exactly as it happened and those who have a tendency to muddle what’s happened with what’s imagined.
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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
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Graphene-based sheets make dirty water drinkable simply and cheaply

Graphene-based sheets make dirty water drinkable simply and cheaply | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Engineers at the Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) have developed graphene-based biofoam sheets that can be laid on dirty or salty dams and ponds to produce clean drinking water, using the power of the sun. This new technique could be a cheap and simple way to help provide fresh water in countries where large areas of water are contaminated with suspended particles of dirt and other floating matter.

The biofilm is created as a two-layered structure consisting of two nanocellulose layers produced by bacteria. The lower layer contains pristine cellulose, while the top layer also contains graphene oxide, which absorbs sunlight and produces heat. The system works by drawing up water from underneath like a sponge where it then evaporates in the topmost layer, leaving behind any suspended particulates or salts. Fresh water then condenses on the top, where it can be drawn off and used.

"The process is extremely simple," said Srikanth Singamaneni, associate professor of mechanical engineering and materials at WUSTL. "The beauty is that the nanoscale cellulose fiber network produced by bacteria has excellent ability to move the water from the bulk to the evaporative surface while minimizing the heat coming down, and the entire thing is produced in one shot."
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New movie screen technology lets you see 3D without glasses

New movie screen technology lets you see 3D without glasses | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has created movie screen technology that lets you watch 3D movies without the stupid glasses.

Co-developed with the Weizmann Institute for Science in Israel, the technology actually makes the picture more crisp. Dubbed Cinema 3D, the technology also makes the on-screen image viewable from any seat in the theater.
“Existing approaches to glasses-free 3-D require screens whose resolution requirements are so enormous that they are completely impractical,” says MIT professor Wojciech Matusik. “This is the first technical approach that allows for glasses-free 3-D on a large scale.”
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Deep learning algorithm paints smooth-moving works of art

Deep learning algorithm paints smooth-moving works of art | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Last year, Google unleashed its Deep Dream Generator on the world, and a wave of images filled with bright lines, eyeballs and creepy dog heads flooded the internet. Now a team at the University of Freiburg in Germany has given neural networks a better sense of style by developing a method for taking an existing art style and smoothly applying it to a video. Artists, including New York-based Danil Krivoruchko, have already put the system to work with some beautiful results.

The researchers build on previous studies, particularly a paper outlining a neural algorithm where the style of an image could be overlaid onto another still image, with adjustable parameters that could find a balance between the artistic style and the content of the image. This approach can be applied to videos by processing each frame as an individual image before stitching them back together, but it's not ideal. The wider context of each frame within the video isn't accounted for, resulting in a jarring, flashy mess.

To smooth things out, the team introduced a few rules into how the images are rebuilt in the desired style. A temporal constraint encourages the system to change as little of the image as possible from the previous frame, and a multi-pass algorithm clears up artifacts that form around the edges of the shot. When a character runs across a scene, for example, things that pass behind them are tracked so that when they reappear, the system doesn't rebuild them from scratch but remembers how they looked before they were blocked from view.
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Americans Are Wary about Body-Enhancement Technologies

Americans Are Wary about Body-Enhancement Technologies | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Emerging technologies that draw from biomedical technology, nanotechnology, information technology and other fields are developing at a rapid pace and may lead to any number of ways people might be able to “upgrade” themselves. Such technologies, in the pipeline now to address medical and therapeutic needs, could produce new ways for humans to push the boundaries of their abilities, making their minds sharper and their bodies stronger and healthier than ever before.

But a new Pew Research Center survey of U.S. adults shows that majorities greet the possibility of these breakthroughs with more wariness and worry than enthusiasm and hope.

The Center’s study focuses on the U.S. public’s reactions to three emerging technologies that could fundamentally improve people’s health, cognitive abilities or physical capacities. The specific examples were: gene editing to give a healthy baby a much reduced risk of serious diseases and conditions over their lifetime; implanting a computer chip in the brain to give a healthy person a much improved ability to concentrate and process information; and a transfusion with synthetic blood to give healthy people much improved speed, strength and stamina.
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Scientists think cockroach milk could be the superfood of the future

Scientists think cockroach milk could be the superfood of the future | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
An international team of scientists has just sequenced a protein crystal located in the midgut of cockroaches. The reason?

It’s more than four times as nutritious as cow’s milk and, the researchers think it could be the key to feeding our growing population in the future.

Although most cockroaches don’t actually produce milk, Diploptera punctate, which is the only known cockroach to give birth to live young, has been shown to pump out a type of ‘milk’ containing protein crystals to feed its babies.

The fact that an insect produces milk is pretty fascinating – but what fascinated researchers is the fact that a single one of these protein crystals contains more than three times the amount of energy found in an equivalent amount of buffalo milk (which is also higher in calories then dairy milk).

Clearly milking a cockroach isn’t the most feasible option, so an international team of scientists headed by researchers from the Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in India decided to sequence the genes responsible for producing the milk protein crystals to see if they could somehow replicate them in the lab.

"The crystals are like a complete food - they have proteins, fats and sugars. If you look into the protein sequences, they have all the essential amino acids," said Sanchari Banerjee, one of the team, in an interview with the Times of India.

Not only is the milk a dense source of calories and nutrients, it’s also time released. As the protein in the milk is digested, the crystal releases more protein at an equivalent rate to continue the digestion.

"It’s time-released food," said Subramanian Ramaswamy, who led the project. "if you need food that is calorifically high, that is time released and food that is complete. This is it."
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There is no difference between computer art and human art – Oliver Roeder | Aeon Ideas

But the honest-to-God truth, at the end of all of this, is that this whole notion is in some way a put-on: a distinction without a difference. ‘Computer art’ doesn’t really exist in an any more provocative sense than ‘paint art’ or ‘piano art’ does. The algorithmic software was written by a human, after all, using theories thought up by a human, using a computer built by a human, using specs written by a human, using materials gathered by a human, at a company staffed by humans, using tools built by a human, and so on. Computer art is human art – a subset rather than a distinction. It’s safe to release the tension.

A different human commentator, after witnessing the program beat the human champ at Go, felt physically fine and struck a different note: ‘An amazing result for technology. And a compliment to the incredible capabilities of the human brain.’ So it is with computer art. It’s a compliment to the human brain – and a complement to oil paints and saxophone brass.
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So you think you chose to read this article? - BBC News

So you think you chose to read this article? - BBC News | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
You may think you choose to read one story over another, or to watch a particular video rather than all the others clamouring for your attention.

But in truth, you are probably manipulated into doing so by publishers using clever machine learning algorithms.

The online battle for eyeballs has gone hi-tech.

Every day the web carries about 500,000 tweets, 300 hours of YouTube video uploads, and more than 80 million new Instagram photos every day. Just keeping up with our friends' Facebook and Twitter updates can seem like a full-time job.

So publishers desperately trying to get us to read and watch their stuff in the face of competition from viral videos and pictures of cats that look like Hitler are enlisting the help of data analytics and artificial intelligence (AI).

But do these technologies actually work?
A question of timing

Recent start-up Echobox has developed a system it says takes the human guesswork out of the mix. By analysing large amounts of data, it learns how specific audiences respond to different articles at different times of the day.

It then selects the best stories to post and the best times to post them.
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BratWurst Bot serves up brats in Berlin

BratWurst Bot serves up brats in Berlin | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Earlier this month, a cybernetic, one-armed sausage chef specializing in bratwurst served up steady stream of German bangers for a celebrity crowd. The robotic short-order cook, called BratWurst Bot, was built by the Forschungszentrum Informatik (FZI) based in Karlesruhe, Germany out of off-the-shelf parts as a technology demonstrator to show how easy it is to create new, practical robots without the need for special fabrication.BratWurst Bot made its debut on July 7 at the 53rd Stallwächterparty (Stable Guard party) of the Federal government of Baden-Württemberg State in Berlin – a major annual social event first staged in 1965 that attracts businesses, politicians, and international celebrities. Though it looked as if BratWurst Bot was just there to help with the barbecue, it's real purpose was to show how flexible modern robotics have become. FZI wanted to prove how easy it was to put together this type of autonomous robot, as well as showcase how it can interact with people in a service environment.
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Pokémon Go: the app that leads you places other apps don't

Pokémon Go: the app that leads you places other apps don't | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The launch of augmented reality game Pokémon Go has been a resounding success for Nintendo and app developer Niantic. Reports suggest it to be the most popular mobile game in US history, with the number of daily active users at times surpassing Twitter, Facebook, and Tinder. But one of its most interesting features is not within the game onscreen at all.

Based on the 20-year-old Nintendo franchise, the aim of the game is to walk around real-world locations in order to capture “in the wild” Pokémon generated in the game. Using a smartphone’s camera, the augmented reality app allows players to find the Pokémon superimposed onto real spaces, with the aim to catch all the Pokémon in predefined geographical locations. Additional bonuses come through checking in at “Pokéstops” – smaller geographical landmarks that the game defines as significant. A visit to a café, pub, or bakery for example could see you rewarded with a number of items to make it easier to “catch them all”.

Playing Pokémon Go myself I have been fascinated by the element of urban exploration the game encourages, particularly around those familiar places now marked as Pokéstops. Wendy Joy Darby, in her book Landscape and Identity, argues that “place is indubitably bound up in personal experience”. I’ve lived in Norwich all my life, for example, and I’d like to think my personal experience means I know the city quite well. Yet even I have found myself surprised at some of the locations the app has identified as culturally or socially significant in some way.
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Storage device writes information atom-by-atom - BBC News

Storage device writes information atom-by-atom - BBC News | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The quest for storage devices that pack more information into a smaller space has reached a new limit, with memory that writes information atom-by-atom.

Dutch scientists developed rewritable memory that stores information in the positions of individual chlorine atoms on a copper surface.

The information storage density is two to three orders of magnitude beyond current hard disk or flash technology.

Details of the advance appear in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

The 1 kilobyte memory is the work of a team led by Sander Otte at the Technical University of Delft (TU Delft). With each bit of data represented by the position of a single chlorine atom, the team was able to reach a density of 500 Terabits per square inch.

"In theory, this storage density would allow all books ever created by humans to be written on a single post stamp," said Dr Otte.

Or, by another measure, the entire contents of the US Library of Congress could be stored in a 0.1mm-wide cube.

The researchers used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), in which a sharp needle probes the atoms on the surface one by one.
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Half of all US food produce is thrown away, new research suggests

Half of all US food produce is thrown away, new research suggests | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Americans throw away almost as much food as they eat because of a “cult of perfection”, deepening hunger and poverty, and inflicting a heavy toll on the environment.

Vast quantities of fresh produce grown in the US are left in the field to rot, fed to livestock or hauled directly from the field to landfill, because of unrealistic and unyielding cosmetic standards, according to official data and interviews with dozens of farmers, packers, truckers, researchers, campaigners and government officials.

From the fields and orchards of California to the population centres of the east coast, farmers and others on the food distribution chain say high-value and nutritious food is being sacrificed to retailers’ demand for unattainable perfection.

“It’s all about blemish-free produce,” says Jay Johnson, who ships fresh fruit and vegetables from North Carolina and central Florida. “What happens in our business today is that it is either perfect, or it gets rejected. It is perfect to them, or they turn it down. And then you are stuck.”

Food waste is often described as a “farm-to-fork” problem. Produce is lost in fields, warehouses, packaging, distribution, supermarkets, restaurants and fridges.

By one government tally, about 60m tonnes of produce worth about $160bn (£119bn), is wasted by retailers and consumers every year - one third of all foodstuffs.
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Electronic "tattoo" muscles in on emotion mapping

Electronic "tattoo" muscles in on emotion mapping | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Electromyography procedures, which record the electrical signals of muscles to diagnose neuromuscular disorders, usually require the insertion of a needle electrode into the muscle itself. Obviously, that isn't exactly a pleasant experience, so a team at Tel Aviv University's (TAU's) Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have developed a more comfortable and accessible alternative in the form of an electronic "tattoo" that unobtrusively monitors muscle activity, for a range of medical and commercial purposes.

Anyone who ever put on and forgot about a temporary tattoo as a kid will understand how unobtrusive the device is to wear, but this is a little more involved than the Road Runner rub-on that came with your cereal.

"Our 'electric tattoo' consists of three parts," explains Yael Hanein, the TAU professor who led the study. "A carbon electrode, an adhesive surface that sticks temporary tattoos to the skin and a nanotechnology-based conductive polymer coating, with special nano-topography, that enhances the electrode's performance."
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Are Robots Still Just "Tools" When They Are Used to Kill?

Are Robots Still Just "Tools" When They Are Used to Kill? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A robot carrying an explosive device was used to kill one of the shooters in Thursday night’s horrific violence in Dallas, Texas, in what many law enforcement and other experts are calling the first such use of robotics technology by U.S. police. Five police officers were killed and seven others were wounded, along with two civilians, during a demonstration protesting the recent deaths of two African-American men at the hands of police in other cities. Micah Johnson, the man suspected of shooting the officers, was killed by remotely detonated explosives on the robot after a standoff and failed negotiations with police.

Toby Walsh, a professor of artificial intelligence at the University of New South Wales, cautions against seeing this use of a robot as a nightmarish science-fiction scenario—because the robot was being operated by a human via remote control. “In [that] sense, it was no more taking us down the road to killer robots than the remote-controlled Predator drones flying above the skies of Iraq, Pakistan and elsewhere,” Walsh told Scientific American in an email. “A human was still very much in the loop and this is a good thing.”

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Pattern-changing shirts react to pollution and radiation

Pattern-changing shirts react to pollution and radiation | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
As air pollution becomes a bigger concern in communities around the globe, creative ways to detect it are beginning to proliferate. We've seen smartphone sensors proposed, as well as portable personal pollution monitors and even backpack-wearing, pollution-monitoring pigeons. Now, a designer out of New York City has released a line of shirts that change to solid black when they are contaminated by pollutants. But they're not cheap.

The shirts, called Aerochromics, have been created by Nikolas Bentel, who refers to himself as an "artist/designer/performance artist." Bentel worked with the Autodesk Applied Research Lab – the R&D outpost of 3D software maker Autodesk – to develop three different shirts: one that changes in the presence of carbon monoxide, one that changes when particle pollution (like excessive dust) is present, and one that reacts in the presence of radioactivity.

Bentel told Gizmag that each shirt works in a slightly different way.
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Ray Kurzweil: To Merge With Technology Is to Enhance Our Humanity

Ray Kurzweil: To Merge With Technology Is to Enhance Our Humanity | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Technological shifts outpace our awareness of them. While we're busy with our day-to-day lives—getting a new smartphone or downloading the next updates—we often don't notice how these incremental changes shape our relationship with technology. According to Ray Kurzweil, this trend will continue as we become more closely integrated with the tech around us.

“At some point, we’ll be literally a hybrid of biological and nonbiological thinking, but it's a gradual transition,” Kurzweil says.

Instead of happening overnight, he predicts we’ll steadily enhance ourselves using technology, not by replacing the parts that make us human but by building on them over time.

One of the biggest concerns people express about this idea is the fear of losing one’s body or mind in the process—that we’ll become less and less human in the future.

“I don’t want to give that up. I’m not talking about giving things up,” Kurzweil says. “I’m talking about enhancing our experience and our bodies and our brains.”

He likens this process to what happens as we grow and change through life. At what point do we cease to be our "old selves" and become our "new selves"? There isn’t a clear line. We change and grow incrementally. And day to day, those incremental changes aren’t obvious.

“You’re not the same person you were when you were four years old—where is that four-year-old girl? Is she gone, should we mourn her? Well, no, she’s contained in you. You’ve enhanced yourself to become who you are today,” Kurzweil argues.

One thing is clear: Most of us rarely go a day without technology. What do you think will happen in the coming years? Will we become even more closely tied to our tools? Should we?
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Is Your Nervous System a Democracy or a Dictatorship?

Is Your Nervous System a Democracy or a Dictatorship? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
How does the architecture of our brain and neurons allow each of us to make individual behavioral choices? Scientists have long used the metaphor of government to explain how they think nervous systems are organized for decision-making. Are we at root a democracy, like the U.K. citizenry voting for Brexit? A dictatorship, like the North Korean leader ordering a missile launch? A set of factions competing for control, like those within the Turkish military? Or something else?The Conversation

In 1890, psychologist William James argued that in each of us “[t]here is… one central or pontifical [nerve cell] to which our consciousness is attached.” But in 1941, physiologist and Nobel laureate Sir Charles Sherrington argued against the idea of a single pontifical cell in charge, suggesting rather that the nervous system is “a million-fold democracy whose each unit is a cell.”

So who was right?

For ethical reasons, we’re rarely justified in monitoring single cells in healthy people’s brains. But it is feasible to reveal the brain’s cellular mechanisms in many nonhuman animals. As I recount in my book “Governing Behavior,” experiments have revealed a range of decision-making architectures in nervous systems – from dictatorship, to oligarchy, to democracy.
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Martian Colonists Could Be Genetically Engineered for Democracy - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus

Martian Colonists Could Be Genetically Engineered for Democracy - Facts So Romantic - Nautilus | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
It sounds like science fiction: A citizenry genetically engineered to be democratic. It’s not implausible. Last month, the National Academy of Sciences issued a report touting the promise of a biological engineering technique called gene drive—particularly for dealing with public health problems such as the Zika virus, malaria, and dengue fever. Last year, Anthony James, a biologist at the University of California, Irvine, led a team that used the gene drive to genetically fashion mosquitos with an immune system that inhibits the spread of the malaria-causing parasite. “Quite a few people,” he told STAT, “are trying to develop a gene drive for population-suppression of Aedes”—Aedes aegypti, the mosquito carrying the Zika virus. But officials at the National Academy Sciences say it’s best to be cautious with a technique likely too immature for field use.

It seems like only a matter of time, though, before gene drive becomes a mature technique. After all, it’s just a way to encourage—or block—the inheritance of select genes in a given population. Once it has, what’s to stop gene drive from being used for all sorts of other applications, including ones that enhance the fitness of organisms rather than weakening them? The underlying technology for it, CRISPR Cas9—a gene-editing tool adapted from the prokaryote immune system—can precisely, easily, and cheaply snip strands of DNA, allowing for customizable genomes. With such an accessible technology, it seems likely humans will start to not just take away bad things—like illnesses transmitted by mosquitos—but also add good things.
Consider the ideal Mars colonist. Elon Musk’s SpaceX was founded to colonize the Red Planet, and he recently said that colonists on Mars should engage in direct democracy because “the potential for corruption is substantially diminished in a direct, versus a representative, democracy.” Makes sense. Now all Mars needs are women and men who are up for the task. Turns out, political engagement might be in the genes.
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Japan is about to test out plans for a real-life space elevator

Japan is about to test out plans for a real-life space elevator | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The idea of a space elevator to lift us into orbit is one of the oldest concepts in sci-fi, but thanks to the efforts of scientists in Japan, we might soon be seeing this fantastic feat of engineering become a reality at last.

A mini satellite called STARS-C (Space Tethered Autonomous Robotic Satellite-Cube) is heading to the International Space Station in the coming months and is a prototype design that could form the basis of a future space elevator.

Once STARS-C has been delivered – on some to-be-determined date after the Northern Hemisphere's summer – its makers at Shizuoka University will put it to the test: the orbiter will split into two 10-cm (3.94-inch) cubes and spool out a thin 100-metre tether made of Kevlar between them.

If plans for a space elevator are to get off the ground, a super-strong tether like this will one day winch people and supplies up from the Earth, so these tests are going to be crucial in finding if this kind of project can actually work.

The satellite is the invention of engineers Yoshiki Yamagiwa and Masahiro Nomi, who came up with the concept in 2014 and submitted their idea to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). STARS-C will eventually be launched from the Kibo module on the ISS, owned by JAXA.
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'Foodporn' predates Instagram by at least 500 years - Futurity

'Foodporn' predates Instagram by at least 500 years - Futurity | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
All the food images that your foodie friends post on Instagram might have seemed familiar to Renaissance master painters.

Researchers analyzed the contents of 500 years of European and American food paintings. Their findings suggest our obsession with looking at tasty, exotic food isn’t just a social media fad.

The researchers found indulgent, rare, and exotic foods were historically popular in paintings despite being foods not readily available to the average family living at that time.

“Our love affair with visually appealing, decadent or status foods is nothing new,” says Andrew Weislogel, curator of earlier European and American art at Cornell University’s Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art. “It was already well established 500 years ago.”
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New Concentrating Solar Tower Is Worth Its Salt with 24/7 Power

New Concentrating Solar Tower Is Worth Its Salt with 24/7 Power | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Deep in the Nevada desert, halfway between Las Vegas and Reno, a lone white tower stands 195 meters tall, gleaming like a beacon. It is surrounded by more than 10,000 billboard-size mirrors focusing the sun’s rays on its tip. The Crescent Dunes “concentrating solar power” plant looks like some advanced communication device for aliens. But the facility’s innovation lies in the fact that it can store electricity and make it available on demand any time—day or night.

Crescent Dunes, the flagship project of Santa Monica–based firm SolarReserve, has achieved what engineers and proponents of renewable energy have struggled with for decades: providing cheap, commercial-scale, non–fossil fuel electricity even when winds are calm or the sun is not shining. The facility is touted as being the first solar power plant that can store more than 10 hours of electricity, which translates into 1,100 megawatt-hours, enough to power 75,000 homes. “We can ramp up electricity generation for utilities based on the demand. We can turn on when they want us to turn on and we can turn off when they want us to turn off,” SolarReserve CEO Kevin Smith says.

The trick is to have all those mirrors heat up a massive tank fullof sodium and potassium nitrates that are pumped up to the top of the tower. There the molten salt can reach temperatures as high as 565 degrees Celsius. When electricity is needed, the hot salt is used to boil water and produce high-temperature, high-pressure steam, which turns turbines that generate electricity. The rest of the time, the molten salt can be stored in another insulated tank on the ground.
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Bio-robot crawler made with sea slug muscles

Bio-robot crawler made with sea slug muscles | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Recently, researchers from a number of universities managed to merge engineered rat heart cells and a gold skeleton to create a stingray robot that could be steered left or right. In a similar vein, scientists at Case Western Reserve University have created a crawling robot from sea slug muscles attached to a 3D-printed body, with aims of one day sending swarms of biohybrid robots on sea search missions.

The 2 in (5 cm) "biohybrid" robot is built around the sea slug muscle known as the buccal mass, which forms part of the animal's mouth and is made up of two arm-like structures. The researchers connected these arms to a frame of 3D-printed polymers, and through an external electrical field, were able to make the robot crawl along through the contraction and release of the buccal muscle. In the first tests, it managed a top speed of about 0.16 in (4 mm) per minute.

"We're building a living machine – a biohybrid robot that's not completely organic – yet," said Victoria Webster, the PhD student leading the research. The sea slug was chosen because of the hardiness of its muscles, which can adapt to significant changes in temperature, salinity and other environmental conditions.
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Silver Tsunami: The Aging Population of Baby Boomers May Be a Global Crisis

Silver Tsunami: The Aging Population of Baby Boomers May Be a Global Crisis | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The world’s population is topsy-turvy, and its exponential and uneven growth could have disastrous consequences if we aren’t ready for it. Humanity recently hit a benchmark, a population of 7.9 billion in 2013. It is expected to reach 8.5 billion by 2030, and 9.6 billion by 2050. If that weren’t enough, consider 11.2 billion in 2100. Most of the growth is supposed to come from nine specific countries: India, Pakistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Nigeria, the United States, and Indonesia.

It isn’t fertility that is driving growth, but rather longer lifespans. World population growth peaked in the 1960s, and has been dropping steadily since the '70s. 1.24% was the growth rate a decade ago, annually. Today, it is 1.18% per year. Populations in developed countries have slowed to a trickle. Here, it has gotten too expensive to have a child for a large segment of the populace, particularly in the wake of the Great Recession, when young people have to invest a lot of time in education and building a career, spending their most fertile years in lecture halls and office cubicles. Although overall, fertility has been dropping worldwide, the report says researchers used the "low-variant" scenario of population growth. It could be higher.
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Facebook is dividing us — Medium

Facebook is dividing us — Medium | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
In the days when the Leftie newspaper sat side by side with the Rightie we couldn’t avoid but see some of the other side of the argument. It was quite literally on the other side. We couldn’t avoid the fact that at the very least, one smart editor thinks something that we don’t.

When news came to us endorsed by no-one more than the journalist and editor we couldn’t be certain that our friends would agree with it. We were forced to question ourselves and to debate it before plunging out into society with that opinion held strong in front of us. We feared looking silly and so we were to some degree cautious and questioning.

Now that so much news comes ready-packaged with likes and comments we hardly even stop to question it. We’re are, by-design, shown the things that an algorithm thinks we’ll read, like and share again. Our news is designed to look like what we want to see, to hear like what we want to listen to. It comes selectively, pre-endorsed by the friends who happened to agree with it. It must be right. Maybe we had other friends who disagreed. We’ll never know though because they never even saw it. Those who disagree are quietly shown the digital door out. Their news isn’t silenced just published into a different part of the residency, one we will never visit.

News we don’t want to read and which we don’t want to click on never appears in our feed. We believe that our viewpoint is right because Facebook shows us what we believe is right and then tells us the other people who also agree with it. The news we don’t like goes into other newsfeeds, is read by other people shared by them and assumed equally right by them too.

That doesn’t mean that it’s people whose viewpoints we don’t respect though. It doesn’t mean that those aren’t the people who would make us stop and question. But stopping and questioning generates lower engagement, fewer click-throughs, likes and shares than reading and discussing.
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Biodiversity Below 'Safe' Levels? Ecologists Disagree

Biodiversity Below 'Safe' Levels? Ecologists Disagree | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A new paper reports that over half of Earth’s land area has suffered biodiversity loss beyond “safe limits.”

The study, released today in Science, compiles a global dataset of biodiversity change and compares it to human land use patterns. The analysis shows that 58 percent of Earth’s land, which is home to 71 percent of the human population, has surpassed a recently proposed safe limit for biodiversity loss, beyond which ecosystems may no longer support human societies.

While the news sounds dire, other ecologists contend that the very notion of setting “safe limits” is a danger in itself, and criticize this line-in-the-sand approach to assessing the planet’s ecological health. In fact, critics say setting a limit may do more harm than good.
The Biodiversity Safety Scale

“We’re crossing into a zone of uncertainty,” says lead scientist Tim Newbold of University College London.

The safe limit is defined as a 10 percent reduction in the Biodiversity Intactness Index (BII), a measure of population abundances across many species relative to their numbers in the preindustrial era. The measure comes from the Planetary Boundaries framework proposed in 2009 and updated in 2015, which aims to set limits on properties of Earth to ensure a “safe operating space” — that is, environmental conditions suitable for us agricultural, industrial humans.

The Planetary Boundaries (PBs) are based on measurable properties for nine categories including climate change, ocean acidification, and ozone depletion. For each category, scientists have tried to establish a safe zone, a zone of uncertainty, and a high-risk zone.

The study by Newbold and colleagues is the most comprehensive assessment to date of where we stand on the Planetary Boundary scale in terms of biodiversity.

It is “really an impressive analysis bringing to bear some of the best datasets that we have,” says biologist Tom Oliver of the University of Reading, who wasn’t involved in the study.
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Pokémon Go is a blueprint for the rise of robots

Pokémon Go is a blueprint for the rise of robots | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Pokémon Go has gone straight to the top of the gaming charts in the US and Australia, where it was first released at the start of July. The smartphone-based game has already been downloaded by nearly 6% of US Android users. What makes this latest installment of the 20-year-old Pokémon franchise so appealing is its extensive use of augmented reality (AR): players use their smartphones to reveal fantastic creatures in the real world and then try to catch them.

It is the first time an augmented reality video game has achieved such global success, and its initial impact on our society is quickly becoming apparent. We have an invaluable opportunity to observe how new ways of interacting with technology affect our lives and how they can be regulated.

Pokémon was already the world’s second best-selling video game franchise, with more than 200m units sold worldwide since it became globally popular in the 1990s. But the phenomenon involves a wide spectrum of elements, from toys and merchandise to animated TV shows and movies.
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