Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
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Topology: The Secret Ingredient In The Latest Theory of Everything

Topology: The Secret Ingredient In The Latest Theory of Everything | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Combine topology with symmetry and add a sprinkling of quantum mechanics. The result? A powerful new theory of everything


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Between Science & Art: Connectograms and Circos Visualization Tool

Between Science & Art: Connectograms and Circos Visualization Tool | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

The point is to show how advances in imaging and data visualization technologies enable inter-disciplinary research which just a decade ago would have been impossible to conduct. There is also a somewhat artistic quality to these images, which reinforces the notion of data visualization being both art and science.

 

CONNECTOME: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=connectome

 


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Patricia Churchland: Neuromorality

Why are humans moral? Patricia Churchland, author of "Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality," is here to explain how humans evolved to be moral beings. How did we go from the attachment and bonding between parent and child to the sophisticated moral landscape we have today? Churchland believes a big part of the answer is in the evolution of the mammalian brain.


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Emblems Of Awareness

Emblems Of Awareness | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Humankind’s sharpest minds have figured out some of nature’s deepest secrets. Why the sun shines. How humans evolved from single-celled life. Why an apple falls to the ground. Humans have conceived and built giant telescopes that glimpse galaxies billions of light-years away and microscopes that illuminate the contours of a single atom. Yet the peculiar quality that enabled such flashes of scientific insight and grand achievements remains a mystery: consciousness.


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The Realities of Reason

The Realities of Reason | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

The theory holds that when we reason, we generate models of what is possible given not only the stated premises but also our own knowledge. Our limited working memory makes it difficult for us to think of all possible models, and this limitation, according to Johnson-Laird, is one of our biggest cognitive failures.
We also assume that our mental models only represent what is true, which can lead to systematic fallacies. Some of these fallacies are so powerful that they seem to be cognitive illusions. Such fallacies present a dilemma for theories of reasoning that involve formal rules of inference, because we shouldn’t be making these kinds of mistakes as long as we have valid rules.


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The Human Body as Ecosystem: A Way to Revolutionize Medicine

The Human Body as Ecosystem: A Way to Revolutionize Medicine | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Looking at human beings as ecosystems that contain many collaborating and competing species could change the practice of medicine


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Once considered mainly 'brain glue,' astrocytes' power revealed

Once considered mainly 'brain glue,' astrocytes' power revealed | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

A type of cell plentiful in the brain, long considered mainly the stuff that holds the brain together and oft-overlooked by scientists more interested in flashier cells known as neurons, wields more power in the brain than has been realized, according to new research published March 29 in Science Signaling.


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Can the brain control itself?

Can the brain control itself? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

The patient’s task was to control the activity of single neurons. There are several 100 billion neurons in the human brain. How can the patient begin to know which neuron needs to increase in activity to complete the task? The researchers left this part up to the patients, letting them explore strategies until amazingly, they succeeded.


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Japan scientist makes 'Avatar' robot

Japan scientist makes 'Avatar' robot | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A Japanese-developed robot that mimics the movements of its human controller is bringing the Hollywood blockbuster 'Avatar' one step closer to reality.

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Catching A Mood On Facebook -Positive and negative emotions spread on social network Science News

Catching A Mood On Facebook -Positive and negative emotions spread on social network Science News | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Positive and negative emotions spread on social network...

SAN DIEGO — Facebook users can spread emotions to their online connections just by posting a written message, or status update, that’s positive or negative, says a psychologist who works for the wildly successful social network.

This finding challenges the idea that emotions get passed from one person to another via vocal cues, such as rising or falling tone, or by a listener unconsciously imitating a talker’s body language, said Adam Kramer on January 27 at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. Kramer works at Facebook’s headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif.

“It’s time to rethink how emotional contagion works, since vocal cues and mimicry aren’t needed,” Kramer said. “Facebook users’ emotion leaks into the emotional worlds of their friends.”


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