Beyond KM
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Beyond KM
The road to knowledge is via conversations, connections and relationships. A curated magazine focusing on knowledge networking, sharing and collaboration.
Curated by Brad Abbott
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Enterprise 2.0 and social business : what’s next ? (Part 2 : the tools) | Bertrand Duperrin's Notepad

"Summary : the predictable evolution of social and 2.0 strategies will cause a reorganization of a landscape that’s essentially crowded by social networks todays. The already-started evolution of business tools, the need for tools helping to manage and measure the human capital in a new paradigm will cause a radical evolution of traditional players as well as a new balance of power in the internal digital landscape. Except if a lack of anticipations creates a new and bigger imbalance."

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The Content Economy: Why do people share?

The Content Economy: Why do people share? | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"Last fall, at an Intranet conference in Oslo, Norway, one of the speakers raised a very important question during his session: “Why do people share?”.

 

I have been asking myself the same thing many times and written about it a few times, such as in this blog post from 2010: “Understanding the psychology of sharing – what makes it tick?”.

 

Immediately after the presentation I did some more research on this subject and created a draft blog post (this one), but for some reason I forgot to post it on my blog. Better late than never."

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Defibrillating Knowledge Management | Organizational Knowledge Design

Defibrillating Knowledge Management | Organizational Knowledge Design | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"The social graph used to be analog, fleeting and personal – which extended to our metaphors: “Whom do you call?” “When you spin your office chair around, who are you looking to?” “Whom do you trust to not steer you wrong?”

 

Unless phone calls were recorded and transcribed, the conversations were fleeting. Water cooler chatter died away as people returned to their desks. Each participant taking with them their own knowledge of the interaction; based on their past experience, their cognitive biases evidenced through learning filters, and the random noise that affects the metaphorical learning that helps us navigate our day.

 

While the sociology of trust relationships has not changed, and human cognition is still very much an analog function; the digitization of our interactions has increased dramatically over the past decade. The implications are profound for organizations and should be reflected and exploited in any competent KM strategy."

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Linking Knowledge Management to Content Strategy - exploreB2B

Linking Knowledge Management to Content Strategy - exploreB2B | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"While some who are new to the concept of 'content strategy' might find it overwhelming, it helps to connect it to a pre-existing concept like 'knowledge management'. This is a great way to provide a context for understanding.

 

Recently, I've come to realize that knowledge management and content strategy are almost two sides of the same coin. The former is for an internal audience, the latter is for an external audience."

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Personal Knowledge Management Workshop through Social Learning Centre UK

Personal Knowledge Management Workshop through Social Learning Centre UK | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"In September, I participated in the PKM Personal Knowledge Management Workshop through the Social Learning Centre, UK.

On the site above, it defined Personal Knowledge Management as a ”set of processes, individually constructed, to help each of us make sense of our world & work more effectively."

 

The online workshop was moderated by Harold Jarche who provided reading materials on his blog and various websites around PKM. In particularly, the main model we had an opportunity to learn and apply was his Seek, Sense, Share Framework found in his “Life in Perpetual Beta” blog.

 

So what did I learn through this online workshop? I think the best thing is to present one of my responses for Assignment 3 when we were asked, “What does Personal Knowledgement Management mean to me?” So here it goes…"

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The Knowledge Revolution Is Not About Big Data, It's About Well-Connected Little Data - Forbes

The Knowledge Revolution Is Not About Big Data, It's About Well-Connected Little Data - Forbes | Beyond KM | Scoop.it
To take advantage of the technology we already have, we should stop being so obsessed with (and intimidated by) "big data," and start from where we are, with our own "little data."...

 

"On a certain level, the public has been treating the internet like a super-sized repository of the media they already know. We access text, pictures, audio, video and interactive graphics from this massive storehouse as if we were pulling books off a shelf or turning on the TV. Even if we are contributing to this global library through blogging, or podcasting or uploading music, video or Instagramed photos, we are just filling in boxes that others have made for us.

The internet is all of these things, but it is also (more importantly) the relationships between all of these things. And it is from the “glue” of these relationships that our collective knowledge emerges. Right now, for the most part, we only have the adhesives provided to us by the tech companies that have built these architectures in silicon. In order to really make your own individual connections, you need to write some code. If we rely, solely, on the code of others, we will unknowingly be manipulated by it."

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Why KM isn’t going away anytime soon

Why KM isn’t going away anytime soon | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"There have been a fair number of people in the blogosphere over the last few years who have trumpeted that KM is “Dead” – some of them mean it in an ironic way or simply as a provocative hook to get eyeballs on their blogs, some think the way we understand KM is changing and that the old ways are “dead”, and some actually believe that KM is a term best ceded to IT and that the next shiny thing beckons – be that complexity, agile, or something else."

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Learn Or Die: A Primer | TechCrunch

Learn Or Die: A Primer | TechCrunch | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"Editor's Note: The guest post was written by Craig Malloy, the CEO of Bloomfire, a knowledge sharing tool for the modern workforce.

 

...

 

There is institutional knowledge that needs to be disseminated and accessed more readily, and in parallel, there is a mass of new information and learning that needs to be shared around your company with less friction, every single day. We don’t need “professional development sessions” anymore — we need a better way of life.

 

Businesses need to think more strategically about how they implement their knowledge sharing programs. And no, none of what I’m saying involves a conceptual leap of faith. Instead, the challenge is shaking your organization out of its collective stupor, and inspiring a new kind of learning-driven culture that begets the success you seek.

 

We are still using software designed for a different era, an era with different pain points and different expectations of what it means to work. We’re social, mobile and always connected. We instinctively search for answers to our questions. Business is moving at an incredible pace, no matter what industry you’re in..."

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What Does a Good Knowledge Sharing Culture Look Like? | DB Kay & Associates

What Does a Good Knowledge Sharing Culture Look Like? | DB Kay & Associates | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

" Last week, we examined what a bad knowledge-sharing culture looks like. That’s a pretty easy list for all of us to make, unfortunately; even if we’re blessed not to work in one, we’ve all seen Dilbert or Office Space.

The more interesting questions are, “what makes for a good culture, especially as it pertains to embracing knowledge management practices?” And then, “so, how do we do that?” This post is focused on the first question; stay tuned for thoughts on the second.

We know we’re more likely to have a fun and successful engagement when we walk into the office and see this:

 

1. Easy laughter

2. Difficult discussions.

3. Reviews aren’t surprising.

4. A sense of purpose.

5. Optimism in the company’s success.

6. Engagement.

7. Genuine caring for customers.

8. Investing in employee success.

9. Team members holding each other accountable.

10. Learning is more important than being right.

11. Good coffee

 

 

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The ART of Collaboration (2) | Communities and Collaboration

The ART of Collaboration (2) | Communities and Collaboration | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"There is a desire to develop more effective knowledge sharing and a culture of collaboration in most organisations, but little recognition of what this means in terms of staff development and overcoming barriers to change.

 

The enormous growth of social media tools and social/professional networks over the past few years has created new opportunities and new challenges for people and organisations that want to embrace this dynamic world of social interaction and fluid knowledge flows.

 

However, It is not widely recognised that collaboration and knowledge sharing are skills and practices that rarely get taught. It’s something we may learn on the job in a hit or miss fashion. Some people are natural at it. Others struggle to understand it."

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Getting the best out of tacit knowledge – Part 1 – Understanding what it is. | Innerteams

Getting the best out of tacit knowledge – Part 1 – Understanding what it is. | Innerteams | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"Information resides all around us. If required we can choose to receive information 24 hours a day. Switch on the television, radio, computer or your smartphone and a storage of information will be brought to you on demand. This type of information is explicit. In other words this is information that has in some way been extracted, documented and registered most often in digital form. It’s easy to share and pass on but not all information is explicit.

 

What about the information which resides in our heads and is gathered and based on experiences? Perhaps this information has even more value and if so how can we extract the knowledge in our minds and share with others? This is what we call tacit knowledge."

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Knowledge Transfer Blog: 7 Behaviors of a KT Process Owner | The ...

Knowledge Transfer Blog: 7 Behaviors of a KT Process Owner | The ... | Beyond KM | Scoop.it
A crucial role on any successful knowledge transfer team is the process owner. Knowledge transfer expert Steve Trautman lists top tasks for persons in this role.

 

"Successful knowledge transfer in business is not difficult, but it takes a structured process and following through on clearly defined roles within your workforce or team. In last week’s blog post we looked at the most important tasks of one of those roles—the direct manager—a person with the managerial power to hold employees accountable to their knowledge transfer-related responsibilities (e.g. mentoring, apprenticing, reporting). This week we focus on the role that is the glue which holds a knowledge transfer project together and keeps it progressing—the knowledge transfer process owner."

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Once upon a time tacit knowledge, innovation and context

Once upon a time tacit knowledge, innovation and context | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"One of the most fun and effective ways, to transfer tacit knowledge, is storytelling. The emotional charge contained in the stories causes the message to be integrated faster and deeper.

 

....

 

I think the trick is having the right stories and knowing when to use them to illuminate or contextualize advice. Stories that are quick and illustriative without sounding preachy. The trick is also having the right forum to tell the stories in, because part of the value of the stories is the fact that they really are personal."

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How to Create a Knowledge-Sharing Culture (Part 2 of 2) | DB Kay & Associates

How to Create a Knowledge-Sharing Culture (Part 2 of 2) | DB Kay & Associates | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"…Continued from last week. See part 1 at http://www.dbkay.com/2012/09/17/how-to-create-a-knowledge-sharing-culture-part-1-of-2/

 

... here are some tactics that encourage a good knowledge-sharing culture:

 

- Convince leadership that knowledge sharing is a core part of the   mission

- Make it part of the job.

- Make it a byproduct of collaboration.

- Take the net out from under the high wire.

- Everyone needs to understand “why.”

- Get ‘em early.

- Continually reduce technology irritants.

- Build on enthusiastic peers.

- Measure to improve.

- Communicate the wins.

- Remember, it’s never done."

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E L S U A ~ A KM Blog Thinking Outside The Inbox by Luis Suarez » Why Do I Share My Knowledge?

E L S U A ~ A KM Blog Thinking Outside The Inbox by Luis Suarez » Why Do I Share My Knowledge? | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"A couple of days ago, one of my favourite Enterprise 2.0 and Social Business thought leaders and blogger extraordinaire, Oscar Berg, put together a rather inspiring article that I thought would be worth while reflecting on, specially, since it is at the heart of not just social software, but also collaboration and knowledge management in general.

 

Indeed, in “Why do people share?” he comes to reflect on perhaps one of the toughest challenges to answer for any knowledge worker out there: why do you share your knowledge across? Even more so when the vast majority of people just don’t share theirs out there openly and transparently in the first place. Not even a fraction. Why do we do it then? Or, even better, why don’t we do it?"

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Social Learning and Knowledge Management | Designed For Learning

Social Learning and Knowledge Management | Designed For Learning | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"KM still goes on but it’s likely to be on the margins and not essential for peak organisational performance whereas in 2000 KM really was positioned as a game changer.So what happened?

 

That’s a good question and one which this post is my first attempt at exploring why KM failed to deliver on its early promises. And why do this sort of navel gazing now? Because knowledge management appears to be making a comeback but this time it has a shiny new suit and it’s called social learning."

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Why (And How) You Should Create A Personal Learning Network

Why (And How) You Should Create A Personal Learning Network | Beyond KM | Scoop.it
How should you start your personal learning network? What are other teachers doing to learn from one another? Why isn't there a simple and easy-to-implement guide to building your very own PLN? Now there is ...

 

Read more, a MUST:

http://edudemic.com/2012/10/build-personal-learning-network/

 


Via Gust MEES, David Hain
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It starts with capturing knowledge | Harold Jarche

It starts with capturing knowledge | Harold Jarche | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"In the Altimeter Group’s Report on Enterprise Social Networks, four areas of business value were identified:

1. Encourage Sharing

2. Capture Knowledge

3. Enable Action

4. Empower People

 

Capturing knowledge is the foundation, and drives value up the chain, enabling sharing of knowledge and the ability to take action on that knowledge. All three can then drive empowered people (if the organizational structure allows this, and if it doesn’t, consider the resulting frustration)."

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Ten Ways to Get People to Change

Ten Ways to Get People to Change | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"

How do you get leaders, employees, customers — and even yourself — to change behaviors? Executives can change strategy, products and processes until they're blue in the face, but real change doesn't take hold until people actually change what they do.

I spent the summer reviewing research on this topic. Here is my list of 10 approaches that seem to work.

 

1. Embrace the power of one.

2. Make it sticky.

3. Paint a vivid picture.

4. Activate peer pressure.

5. Mobilize the crowd.

6. Tweak the situation.

7. Subtract, not just add.

8. Dare to link to carrots and sticks (and follow through).

9. Teach and coach well.

10. Hire and fire based on behaviors.

 

These ten principles for changing behaviors are rooted in different theories that are rarely put together: Sharpen the destination (1-3), activate social processes (4 and 5), tweak the situation (6 and 7), and revamp traditional HR levers (8-10)."

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Dick Cheuk
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Practical storytelling techniques for knowledge managers

Storytelling is potentially a simple yet effective knowledge management practice within organisations. However, the knowledge manager is often confronted by how difficult storytelling can be, especially as its artistic aspects ...

Via jeroen thibaut
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Facilitating collaborative learning: A recipe for success | Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies

Facilitating collaborative learning: A recipe for success | Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"This article was written for the September 2012 edition of e.learning age magazine.

 

Jane Hart is a Collaboration Consultant, and a speaker and writer on the use of social technologies for collaborative learning and working. Here she shares her experiences of the online workshops she has been offering at the Social Learning Centre, a global online community for learning professionals."

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What Does a Bad Knowledge-Sharing Culture Look Like? | DB Kay & Associates

What Does a Bad Knowledge-Sharing Culture Look Like? | DB Kay & Associates | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

" Over the past ten years, we’ve had the opportunity to visit and work with fifty or sixty companies implementing knowledge management, self-service, and social support. In the process, I’ve come to feel like a bit of a connoisseur of corporate culture—I expect other consultants know exactly what I mean. Shortly after arriving in an office, I get a sense of whether the culture will be helping us through the hard work of leading change…or whether it will fight us every step of the way.

 

In subsequent blog posts, I’m going to say what I think an effective culture feels like, and how to go about creating one. But I’m going to start with the “fun” one: how to tell you have a challenging culture. In tribute to Spinal Tap, all three lists go to eleven.

 

1. Disbelief in what leaders say.

2. Happy talk that’s not based in reality.

3. Obsession with the urgent and tactical

4. Front-line managers changing what they say based on who is around them.

5. Fear about new metrics.

6. Job insecurity.

7. The expectation that rewards go to the well-connected.

8. The ability to opt-out

9. Distrust among groups

10. Unvoiced Disagreement.

11. A lousy work environment, food service, and coffee

 

 

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Getting the best out of tacit knowledge – Part 2 – Focus on the people | Innerteams

Getting the best out of tacit knowledge – Part 2 – Focus on the people | Innerteams | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"In our previous blog Getting the best out of tacit knowledge – Part 1 – Understanding what it is, we took a look at the different forms of information and paid particular attention to how tacit knowledge is derived and what its sources are.

 

Now that we have identified tacit knowledge as being information which is drawn from personal experiences, cultures and biases and thereby affecting us personally we need to look at the practical methods of this within the work place."

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The collaboration field needs to cooperate

The collaboration field needs to cooperate | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"Training, HR, OD, KM, IT, etc. use different models, speak different languages and go to separate conferences. However, they’re all in the business of collaboration. They just don’t do it with each other. Given the imperatives for continuous growth today, these disciplines need to give serious consideration to recombining their organizational DNA.

 

I believe that a wide range of disciplinary silos can be incorporated into one support function. Professionals could have a variety of roles, depending on organizational needs, but all have to be focused on the organization and its environment. Separate departments create tribes and internal cultures that may be at cross-purposes with other departments or the overall organization. With hyper-linked information and access to expertise, not only are internal departments of less value, they could subvert the organization’s future by not responding quickly and appropriately."

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Unlocking Tacit Knowledge with Social Networking

Unlocking Tacit Knowledge with Social Networking | Beyond KM | Scoop.it

"Social networking is fast becoming the business world's answer to unlocking tacit knowledge hidden within the workforce. Powerful online tools — including mobile communications, smart phones, unstructured information and high-speed Internet — have created a myriad of ways to disseminate information. Companies large and small are trying to keep up with the massive amounts of information generated by their workforce and its interactions with clients, customers and other stakeholders.

 

In this article, PwC Canada's director of emerging technologies Dr. David Jacobson discusses how tacit knowledge can be unleashed and shared as never before by connecting people ubiquitously through social networking and its closely related partner, collaboration. He also provides a number of helpful hints for choosing a social networking tool to tease out and apply tacit knowledge."

 

Download article@:

 

http://www.pwc.com/ca/en/emerging-company/publications/tacit-knowledge-social-networking-2009-11-en.pdf

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