Dr. Dan's Knowled...
Follow
Find
10.8K views | +4 today

Get even more of Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management - subscribe to my newsletter!

Thanks for subscribing to Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management!
Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management
Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management
Knowledge Management viewpoints and curations by a world-wide recognized Knowledge Management Expert and Consultant: President/CEO of Knowledge Management Professional Society (KMPro) - the world's largest KM professional society; Creator of the first KM certification program and remains today after 20 years as the world's longest serving provider of Knowledge Management training and certification with more than 6,500 individuals certified and more than 3,000 in other KM training.
Curated by Dr. Dan Kirsch

${leadGenConfiguration.title}

$leadGenConfiguration.description
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Dr. Dan:  Food for thought on the "why" of KM implementation.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

"KM is not compulsory, but neither is survival."


(Amrit Tiwana)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Knowledge Is Power: Social and the Productivity-Based Business Case

Knowledge Is Power: Social and the Productivity-Based Business Case | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

We've all heard the claim that social business approaches increase worker productivity....Productivity is About People, Not Technology."

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Nice summary of Peter Drucker's six factors that determine knowledge worker productivity:

1.  Measuring knowledge worker productivity is difficult.
2.  Knowledge workers must have autonomy
3 and 4.  Innovation and Learning must be part of the work and the responsibility of the knowledge worker.

5.  Knowledge worker productivity must be measured in both quantity and quality.

6.  Knowledge worker productivity is an asset, not a cost.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

"Business Must Address Big Data Knowledge Gaps" (well, not really)

"Business Must Address Big Data Knowledge Gaps" (well, not really) | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan:  "Big Data" isn't knowledge and really has not that much to do with organizational knowledge gaps.  Yet another IT driven article that gets it wrong.


Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Okay....frankly this one is more confusing than it is helpful.  Apparently there is BIG DATA (you know, that is really BIG) and of course everyone is now like so many clowns with lightening rods held above their heads running around in their clouds trying to figure out where it is and what the heck to do with it.  And now along comes "Big Data Knowledge Gaps."


The problem that I have with this is that by definition and application data is not knowledge.  And accordingly knowledge is not data.  And if you have at least half a clue you probably "get" that knowledge management is a lot about ensuring that the right knowledge is available for decision making.  So where then does data come into play?  I ask because data is something that you can then analyze and otherwise examine, and from that you gain information.  And that eventually becomes factors incorporated within the decision process.  But data and having it or not has very little to do with an organizational knowledge gap.


And that's because there's no direct connection between that data and organizational knowledge gaps.  Yet this article references a report that discusses how "knowledge gaps exist within all levels of today's organizations - gaps that must be addressed."  And someone from the American Management Association then states that "Professionals at all levels have to know what questions to ask and how to make wise choices based on data."


If you have "professionals" at any level in your organization sitting around making decisions based soley on data....be afraid, very afraid.  On the other hand, that could actually explain some of the problems that we do see in many organizations.


So, let's just back the truck up for a moment and start with a discussion of what data is. 


Wikipedia:  "Data as an abstract concept can be viewed as the lowest level of abstraction from which information and then knowledge are derived."


For our purposes let's cut to the chase and come out and say that knowledge comes from the understanding of something, based on for example, association and reasoning and cognitive thought.  And so on.  Data, not so much.  In fact on its own data actually doesn't help us much. 


It's sort of like knowing that your intended destination is 300 miles ahead of you, but you lack any knowledge of how to get there and so simply knowing the 300 miles isn't all that useful until you begin to reason out means of travel, capabilities, costs, time constraints, that pesky mountain range in between, and so on.


The point that I'm hoping to make is that there is no such thing as a "Big Data Knowledge Gap."  Nope.  No such thing in knowledge management.  And knowledge management "owns" knowledge gaps.


That's not to say that Big Data doesn't have an implication upon an organization's knowledge management efforts.  But "big data" (or any data) does not for a knowledge gap make.  Nor does "big data" produce "actionable decision-making data" as this article would suggest (whatever the heck that would be anyway).  Big data can lead you towards that direction, when you understand what that data means.  What that 300 miles means.  And from that you can then consider how what you learn from the data and informaton might be applied to the organizational knowledge gaps from, for example, and decision making perspective.


What we have here is yet another technology driven article, discussing the buzzword du jour "big data" and trying to somehow associate that with "knowledge gaps" in which (as the article states), "the IT department, of course, will play a major role."

Professionals at all levels have to know what questions to ask and how to make wise choices based on data. - See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/analytics-big-data/slideshows/business-must-address-big-data-knowledge-gaps.html/#sthash.j4UslvU9.dpuf
Professionals at all levels have to know what questions to ask and how to make wise choices based on data. - See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/analytics-big-data/slideshows/business-must-address-big-data-knowledge-gaps.html/#sthash.j4UslvU9.dpuf
Professionals at all levels have to know what questions to ask and how to make wise choices based on data. - See more at: http://www.baselinemag.com/analytics-big-data/slideshows/business-must-address-big-data-knowledge-gaps.html/#sthash.j4UslvU9.dpuf
more...
mixmaxmin's curator insight, November 13, 2013 11:44 AM

Agree with these comments. 

Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management "Rules"

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management "Rules" | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Rule #4: Understanding Pig Theory

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

"Never try to teach a pig to sing.  It's a waste of your time, and

it annoys the pig."  (Robert Heinlein)


Many an enthusiastic KM'er has frittered away the hours, days, and weeks trying to do just that.  It is rather unlikely that you'll be able to simply turn senior organizational leadership into "senior leadership with a deep understanding of all things that are KM."  We can hope, but that's not exactly realistic.


"Understanding Pig Theory" is all about recognizing that It is by far easier and much more effective to instead have KM'ers learn how to develop organizational strategy, and then to push forward that strategy.  Identify the organizational performance gaps and then determine what knowledge gaps impact those.  Examine known knowledge gaps and determine what organizational gaps those in turn open or close.  Develop the right outcome-based performance metrics to validate the success of closing those gaps.  Tie all of this to the organizational strategy.  This is much less annoying than trying to teach the pig to sing, and the pig will appreciate it a whole lot more.


Rule #4 is all about showing how KM fits with the organizational strategy, and recognizing that this approach is much more likely to succeed than trying to teach the pig to sing.

more...
Karen du Toit's curator insight, November 14, 2013 2:12 AM

Interesting analogy!

Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Keep Calm - KM Series

Keep Calm - KM Series | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan:  Keep Calm and Try Story Telling

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

WTF Visualizations — Knowledge management.

WTF Visualizations — Knowledge management. | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Knowledge management.
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Some times, when you are a KM'er, you just have to have a sense of humor - here's a model that intentionally makes no sense...which puts it then a step above those models that intend to make sense....but yet don't.  From the WTF Visualizations site (yes, that "WTF" and their tagline is: "Visualizations that make no sense") - a catchy little graphic that makes about as much sense as some of the models that I've seen in KM (e.g. -  Three Legged Stool; KM Pyramid; 3 Circles; KM Frameworks; maturity models, and so on)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Another Face Palm Moment: The Innovation Management Maturity Model

Another Face Palm Moment:  The Innovation Management Maturity Model | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan:  Yupper, yet another so-called "maturity model" which deserves a SUPER face palm recognition for declaring that the "highest maturity organizations embody the three categories of people, process, and tools."


Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Seriously?  Again?  Apparently.  This time an "Innovation Management Maturity Model."


Yes, another so-called "maturity model" that declares that you aren't actually doing innovation unless....wait for it....you are using tools as outlined in the model.  Yup, and the even used that "three-legged stool" metaphor.


And in a great piece of irony....the folks behind this model apparently were conducting a study in which "very few" organizations were at the top levels of maturity because they didn't "embody the three categories of people, process, and tools as outlined in the model."


A peek at what they consider the "tools" to be all about really clears that up for us -- seems that to reach a high level of maturity that you must have in place a Product Portfolio Management (PPM) system that "automates processes."  Which all boils down to utilizing a system sold by (drum roll, please!)....the company that puts out the "Innovation Management Maturity Model" (and who also wrote what seems to be a lot like a marketing fluff piece).


I find it interesting that when you run into "maturity models" that you find that the model has more to do with selling the services of those who create a model than anything else.


And while we're at it, let's take a whack at what they describe as "mature" in the area of "process" -- that would be according to the study, the "automation of the commercialization process" and they "have fully automated and standardized processes."  Glad we cleared that up!


Okay, I think that we've seen enough and we should probably just move along to our regularly scheduled days.  But thanks to them for an opportunity to employ a Super Face Palm!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's KM Tips

Dr. Dan's KM Tips | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Quick tips for improving your Knowledge Management implementation.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Elevator Speech Swap Meets:  These are regular get together opportunities for those who are working within the KM efforts or for those who are KM proponents.  Sharing of KM elevator speeches provides an opportunity to learn from the exchanges, and to allow for you to perfect your own delivery.  (Also see:  KM Elevator Speeches - 6 Fatal Errors)


Supports:  Knowledge Sharing, Knowledge Transfer, Knowledge Capture, Collaboration, Socialization, Networking, Organizational Culture, KM Professional Development.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management "Rules"

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management "Rules" | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Rule #2:  Be Like BASF

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

"Be Like BASF" is based upon BASF, the chemical company, and their long running ad campaign:


"We don't make a lot of the products you buy.  We make a

lot of the products you buy better."

"Be Like BASF" suggests that we need to recognize that in Knowledge Management we don't actually "make" anything, and also shouldn't try to "make anything KM."  Instead we should use KM to make things better.  To use KM to add value.  KM shouldn't be like a coat of paint to be applied "broad brush" throughout the organization.


Rule #2 is all about recognizing that you shouldn't try to create KM "things" and should instead look for things that can be improved upon by applying or integrating KM.  Add value, not processes.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Keep Calm and Share Knowledge!

Keep Calm and Share Knowledge! | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Samuel Johnson on the need for expertise locators!

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

"The next best thing to knowing something is knowing where to find it."


(Samuel Johnson)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

KM Elevator Speeches - 6 Fatal Errors

KM Elevator Speeches - 6 Fatal Errors | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Delivering a Killer Knowledge Management Elevator Speech - Avoid These 6 Fatal Errors!

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

If you do a quick Google search you can certainly come up with discussions regarding the need for a Knowledge Management Elevator Speech.  And you may even find some good examples to "repurpose" for your own usage.  But when I'm asked about delivering a KM elevator speech one particular question comes bubbling to the top each time -- "I think that I have a good one, but how do I know if it's going to achieve the right results?"

Unfortunately the only way that you'll ever know if your KM elevator speech is a "good one" or not, is when you deliver it.  If it's a good one, then hopefully you will have achieved the right results.  Having said, after having delivered thousands of KM elevator speeches, I think that there are a handful of important considerations to keep in mind, to help ensure that your own KM elevator speech doesn't end in a free-fall (that's what might happen on a really bad day in the elevator).

Goal of a KM Elevator Speech

First things first -- before you even identify your potential "target" for your elevator speech you need to determine what your goal is.  That sounds simple, but it's not.    You might think that your goal is to secure funding for the KM program, but it's not.  And if you don't understand that, you're more likely to free fall than not.  A KM elevator speech is a technique used to help someone understand what KM is and why KM is important to them and the organization.  And based upon that an effective KM elevator speech will provide just enough information to give your "target" a strong sense of what you're talking about and want to know more.  That is in fact the goal of a KM elevator speech -- to generate interest for the NEXT discussion.  Nothing more, nothing less.

With that in mind I've identified SIX key considerations (read that as potential problems and probable fatal errors) for your KM elevator speech:

#1 Pea or Not to Pea (and that is not a question)

We've all no doubt long ago heard of "WIIFM" --  the "what's in it for me factor."  But I think that concept doesn't really hit the critical point and so I'd like you to consider, Pea or Not to Pea.  I'd like you to imagine your manager/boss KM elevator speech target as someone who is walking around with a large metal colander affixed to the top of his or her head -- sitting upright, not on their head like a helmet.  Upright.  Yeah, literally think of that image, right now.  Okay.  Now take one very old, very hard, shriveled up pea and toss it into the colander.  And then imagine your manager/boss/target walking around with that hard pea rolling around in that colander.  Do you hear the sound, the racket that it would make?  Excellent.  So there you are, approaching your elevator speech victim...who has that noisy pea rolling around.  And your goal then should be all about giving them a reason to stop making their noise and instead start listening to you (and your noise).  That pea, to your manager/boss/target, is their critical issue.  The one that is always, and I mean always, rolling around in their thoughts.  They seem to be oblivious to the rest of the world because the sound of that pea is louder than all else. 


So here you are with your KM elevator speech, hoping to give them a reason to cease making that racket and instead listen to you.  Do you now understand the critical need for whatever you're about to say needing to actually addresses that pea, the thing that was on their mind a moment ago?  Good.  So make sure you know what their "pea" (problem or issue or concern) is -- for whoever you're targeting for that particular elevator speech.  You'd better be addressing that need or they're going to simply start the racket back up and if they do, you've lost them.  And this is decidedly different than a WIIFM.  A WIIFM is nice, warm, fuzzy and promises to keep you toasty on a cold winter night. 


Addressing their pea might just possibly provide your KM elevator speech target with the first opportunity to believe that someone, anyone, can help address their need.  In short, help them to understand exactly how KM can improve their day, week, month, fiscal year.

#2 Land Mines

A land mine is an explosive device concealed under or on the ground designed to destroy enemy targets that pass over or near the land mine.  The critical issue with a land mine is that failure to be aware of their location in advance often can have fatal results.  Dealing with the land mines for your KM elevator speech are all about recognizing that there are some things that if discussed at the wrong time or in the wrong manner can cause the same fatal problem.  The goal in dealing with the potential landmines for your KM elevator speech is to know in advance where they are and what they are so that you can clear a safe path for your discussion.  I'm talking about the organizational politics.  You need a good situational awareness of those managerial "hot buttons" that can derail your elevator speech and then either avoid them altogether or be prepared to face them head on.  So to avoid those organizational land mines it is important to keep abreast of key organizational issues, and have a good sense of how those politics might either impact  or influence your potential KM elevator speech target.

#3 Weasel Words

These are words and phrases that can create an impression that isn't necessarily accurate, convey specific meaning, or are vague or even ambiguous.  An example of this can be seen in advertisements that promise "savings up to 50%" which doesn't necessarily mean that any particular savings may be offered (as ZERO could be included to be an amount "up to" that 50%).  We all have long since become quite good at recognizing those ads as attempts to lure us through the door, and so we simply pass most of them by. 


When delivering your KM elevator speech you should avoid those ambiguous statements that sound like you're not promising anything at all, and instead back your claims with factual information regarding actual accomplishments or benefits to the organization.  Yes, that does mean that you need to do your homework prior to attempting to deliver a KM elevator speech....but to be blunt, if you don't right now, right this very moment, have a good understanding of specific quantifiable benefits of successful Knowledge Management -- well, you're simply not ready to deliver any KM elevator speech.

#4 Buzzword Bingo

This is what happens when someone attempts to cover or discuss a topic while including seemingly never ending strings of organizational "buzz words."  Buzzword bingo became popular within the workplace by workers who grew tired of predictable references to either out of date business practices or a usage of cliche business terms by those who seem to lack any real understanding of the concepts behind the terms.  Buzzword bingo was popularized by the Dilbert comic strip and was the subject of one episode of "The Office."  Don't engage in buzzword bingo. 


Within a KM elevator speech, buzzword bingo begins the moment you try to include what you believe are "key words" that may (or may not) be important to management and they're often included because of a mistaken belief that by simply mentioning those buzzwords that management will then be drawn to the message like moths to a light.  Unless of course your potential elevator speech target recognizes it for what it is and simply tunes your pitch out as another fine example of buzzword hyping.  That sinking feeling experienced at that moment is elevator speech "free fall."  Again, don't engage in buzzword bingo (and try not to be "buzzword compliant" or use "loaded language" -- and if you aren't familiar with either of those, Google can help with that).

#5 Fighting Words

These are words or phrases that when used can provoke a strongly negative response from a listener, and are often associated with acts of violence and hatred.  Fighting words are usually intended to provoke the listener to have a reaction to the speaker.  In a KM elevator speech you may evoke a strongly negative response if you make a statement which causes your target to then feel compelled to defend that very issue.  For example, you state that "our search capabilities are completely broken and worthless here but KM would fix that."  Fighting words, especially if the target happens to either be the individual responsible for the repository or simply doesn't understand what you mean by "broken."  A better approach might be to state your case as:  "I believe that we're not taking full advantage of our search capabilities and I have some thoughts on how we might improve upon that."  Or, "We have a lot of organizational knowledge that is about to leave out the door but I have some ideas on how we can retain that and in turn ensure that we remain competitive in our marketplace."  Those examples would hopefully induce a desire to continue a thoughtful conversation rather than to invoke a desire to "defend turf."  Words have meaning and this is especially true when you hurl fighting words at your KM elevator speech target.

#6 Doughnut Effect

This happens when you provide so much information so that they feel overwhelmed (and of course then tune you out), causing their eyes to simply "glaze over" (hence, like a glazed doughnut).  To be clear, this is not the time for introducing the concept of drinking from a fire house using a tiny cup but is instead the time for a leisurely sip from a water fountain (refreshing, meets that need, leaves you feeling quenched, but not water-logged).  You need to ease your target into the KM pool, and not throw them into the deep end to see if they can keep up with you.  You need to go slowly, provide clear indications of what you're trying to tell them so that they can then stop and sniff the flowers along the way -- catching up to you only as they are ready.  You're the KM'er.  This isn't new to you.  You know the lingo, the concepts.  Hopefully, right?  Your target needs to develop an appreciation for what it is that you're trying to convey.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Warning: Avoid No Budget, Low Budget, Quick-Win, Low Hanging Fruit KM!

Warning: Avoid No Budget, Low Budget, Quick-Win, Low Hanging Fruit KM! | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan:  If you only go after the low hanging fruit, the rest of it will either rot in the tree or fall to the ground and make a nasty mess.  To get to the really good fruit, you need to climb up the tree....and go OUT ON A LIMB.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:
I was just today asked to comment on something, regarding the hazards of pursuing a "no budget" Knowledge Management implementation.  My response was to simply say, "don't go there."  And here's why.
First let's just get it out into the open -- one of the ugly truths about how management tends to make decisions in an organization with regard to "quick wins" and "low hanging fruit" -- they don't get funded. You can talk about building support until the cash cows come home, but quick wins/low hanging fruit don't generally become a program or project of record.  With a budget attached.  What does happen is that the "quick win" and "low hanging fruit" teams get an ethusiastic pat on the back from those supporters for a job well done and are then told that they should press onward doing more of the same.  That everyone is happy with the efforts so far.  Do more of it.  For no budget - because clearly a budget wasn't necessary to do what has been accomplished thus far.
The tricky thing is that while there's nothing inherently wrong with going after the quick wins/low hanging fruit, that can only be the first step.  It can't be the only step.  And that's the critical part of this discussion.
When given zero budget, or next to it, for "implementing" KM the tendency is to go forth and "do good things" to try to drum up employee and organizational support for KM.  And when those (low level) "good things" happen, of course everyone wants more.  Only natural....to want more good things that you pay nothing for.  Sure, sign me up!
The point then is that before you embark upon any KM journey, it should be planned.  Meaning that you need to know what the organizational Knowledge Gaps are, and have a plan for what KM activities would be used to close those gaps.  Based upon the big picture organizational strategy.  And have a clear picture of what steps are necessary to move forward in that direction.  And then go do that.
I've often found this bit of advice to be useful when working with those who would want to implement KM:  If you only go after the low hanging fruit, the rest of it will either rot in the tree or fall to the ground and make a nasty mess.  To get to the really good fruit, you need to climb up the tree....and go OUT ON A LIMB.
In implementing KM we don't want "small victories" that a quick win or low hanging fruit represents.  What you want, and need, are initial steps to take as part of a "proof of concept" or pilot program approach.  Those first steps are used to take the KM car for its first organizational test drive to see how it handles on the road.  That's how you would for example, decide which car to purchase.  You wouldn't though apply a test drive concept if you were that day deciding if you even needed a car and were considering the bus as an alternative.  That's not the same decision process and would be a waste of your time.
And if at the moment, there is a lack of support by the organization and its managers for implementing KM (as the reason that you believe that you need to go forward with quick wins and such), then you haven't yet made the sale regarding the benefits of KM from a business case perspective to the organization.  And a basket full of "low hanging fruit" won't change that.  Not today, and not next week.  Because hobbies don't get funded.  Successful business cases do.
So what first must be done is to develop a KM champion -- someone senior in management with whom you take the time to explain what KM is (and is not) and lay out a business case for how KM would benefit the organization (and if you don't know how to make a good business case for "doing" KM, then consider this to be your homework assignment as it is critical to learn to speak that business dialect).  Discuss the big picture strategy, and what a preliminary implementation approach might be, including how you could take those first steps towards achieving those goals (those first steps being the quick wins that prove the concept or serve as the kick-off to the pilot program).  And then come to an understanding of what the next steps would be and incorporate those into an action plan, which can then morph into a KM strategy.  Do that.
more...
Gerald King, MKMP, CISSP, MOF's curator insight, October 29, 2013 11:46 AM

Additionally, if the only KM funding is for technology, we get stuck in the mode of every KM solution is technological.

Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Keep Calm - KM Series: Collaboration

Keep Calm - KM Series: Collaboration | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Big Data Cloud Storage Protection System

Big Data Cloud Storage Protection System | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan:  Essential protection for cloud storage of Big Data now available!

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Yes, although previously only available for commercial applications, this is now available for residential applications -- the Big Data Cloud Storage Protection System is ready to safely isolate your home system within The Cone of Protection from data surges within the cloud.


Sold by Cloud Storage providers near you.  Some assembly may be required.  Results are not necessarily typical of all participants and your mileage may vary considerably.  Void where probited by anti-humor ordinances. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

The Paradoxical Traits Of Resilient People

The Paradoxical Traits Of Resilient People | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Resilient people develop a mental capacity that allows them to adapt with ease during adversity. Like bamboo they bend but rarely break. How resilient...
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

I think that there are some useful insights here that can easily be applied to anything like KM implementation, organizational change, and so on!

more...
VisionKnowledge's curator insight, November 13, 2013 7:17 AM

In order to effect change one must be willing to move with the flow and redirect, reframe and rethink,  if necessary. 

Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's KM Tips

Dr. Dan's KM Tips | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Quick tips for improving your Knowledge Management implementation.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Elephant in the Room:  Hold a monthly meeting with KM'ers throughout the organization to discuss those issues and challenges that tend to be the "elephant in the room" -- those things that are known by all but seldom actually discussed.  The goal of these discussions is to consider from a KM perspective how those issues and challenges might be best addressed.


Supports: Knowledge Sharing, Knowledge Transfer, Knowledge Capture, Collaboration, Networking, Organizational Culture, Critical Thinking, Organizational Change.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Dr. Dan:  David Skyrme on information vs. knowledge.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

"Unlike information, knowledge is less tangible and depends on human cognition and awareness."


(David Skyrme)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

The Brain Drain: Using Technology to Capture Retiring Boomer Knowledge

The Brain Drain: Using Technology to Capture Retiring Boomer Knowledge | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan:  Gee, had high hopes and thought that IBM had invented some sort of new fangled de-vicey kind of thang that would yank knowledge right out of our heads.  Turns out that this is a different kind of article, but one that falls into the "look who just caught up" category!


Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Okay, the problem is real -- baby boomers will be retiring by the dozens (or more!) very soon.  And you'll get no argument from me that organizations need to be working hard to capture that knowledge before said baby boomers are off climbing mountains or sailing the seven (or so) seas.


Having said that, this article is more about how use of technology can supposedly "capture retiring boomer knowledge."  Well, that's the claim.  But it pretty much falls down the stairs after that.


Okay, here's the jist of it of the problem as I see it -- and this is a two part problem. 


Part #1:  You see, employees have this thing called "knowledge" and apparently HR now needs to "find ways to hold onto and share historical industry and company knowledge."  From a "what's wrong with this picture" perspective, I'm very lost at exactly HOW the HR department became the knowledge capture band leaders.  Or for that matter, WHEN.  And who in HR developed what Knowledge Management strategy?  Yeah, thought so.


Part #2:  The entire problem apparently can be "solved" by adapting "social technologies" by "creating profiles, sharing information and collaborating on social networks."  Sold by guess who? (And you get one guess, and yes, you are allowed to look at who wrote the article and what company said author works for.)


Yes, organizations do need to capture knowledge before it walks out the door.  And yes, socialization is critical within an organization.  However, simply tossing out "social technologies" with the mistaken belief that they will be magically utilized, and in doing so will somehow by sheer HR manager desire alone then result in the capture of critical organizational knowledge...is...well, it's pretty outright silly.


You see, it takes a bit more than tossing out technology into the workplace to capture knowledge.  There is the whole issue of determining what knowledge needs to be captured -- which speaks to having a Knowledge Management strategy that addresses the organizational knowledge gaps (of today and in the future).  That's because not all knowledge is "created equal."  In fact some of it is darn important....and other, not so much.


Then there is the cultural issue -- the necessity to inculcate within the workforce a desire to share knowledge, to capture it, to transfer it.  And then to actually utilize it.  And so as in many organizations where the employees are treated badly over years and years, simply tossing out the social networking tools and expecting good things to happen is like making offerings to the "knowledge capture fairy" and will be about as successful.


Yes, there are some valid points in the article about knowledge soon heading out the door.  But that's nothing new, and this seems more like a scare tactic (as in, "buy my software says the large company or doom on you, doom on you!).  Unfortunately they lost me when it became clear that this was simply yet another attempt by an IT vendor to hawk their wares, without any thought put into how to actually successfully implement a Knowledge Management program.


Fail.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

"CKO emerges amid healthcare data explosion"

"CKO emerges amid healthcare data explosion" | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan: I'd like to suggest that a simple, "look who just caught up" could be appropriate....but no, they still miss the mark and are deserving of a nice face palm.  So now let's discuss why.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Every once in awhile something just drops into my search feeder that I missed awhile ago but is still worth of at least a passing comment (or a face palm mention) and this is definitely one of those.


Seems that at a recent annual American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) convention that they came to the conclusion in a panel discussion that a “Chief knowledge officer (CKO) is an emerging role we are beginning to see,” Cindy Zak, director of health information and privacy officer at Milford Hospital in Milford, Conn., told her audience at the convention.


Yeah, okay.  Sounds good, yes?  Well....not so much when you read on and find that as "Zak sees it, the CIO acquires, implements and fixes technology. The CKO is an entrepreneur, a change agent -- using data to make better, more targeted and timely treatment possible."


While I would agree with the need for a CKO to be an entrepreneur and a change agent, it definitely remains a face palm kind of moment because, well, there's that pesky little problem that Knowledge Management isn't really about using data. 


But wait there's more!


And then there was this statement that “The CKO needs to report to the CEO,” Zak said. “You need a clear proposition. You need a knowledge management program. You need visionary leadership."


Ah huh.  And that knowledge management program, and visionary leadership, would be doing what? 


That was explained by the next panel participant's comment that "data would become more valuable as healthcare mined it for increasingly targeted information." 


Which clearly indicates what? 


Sure sounds like the targeted information has a whole lot less to do with utilizing knowledge for improving health care and a whole lot more to do with data mining for....well, "targeting" -- which doesn't sound like something that my doctor needs to do.  However, I bet that the marketing department of the health care corporation that my doctor is a part of probably has quite a few ideas about that potential "targeting."


Again, definitely a face palm moment because knowledge management is a whole lot more than what this panel seems to believe that it is and my reaction is that someone seemingly just woke up and decided to slap a "buzz word" on their data management issues.


Perhaps this panel discussion on the impact of knowledge management upon the health care industry would have benefited from, oh, I don't know -- having someone who actually knows what knowledge management IS on the panel that discusses it?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Keep Calm and Learn your Lessons

Keep Calm and Learn your Lessons | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Dr. Dan:  Successful KM implementation is all about having in place an effective KM strategy.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

"Successful knowledge management begins with hard decisions about what knowledge is worth managing."


(Rossett and Marshall)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management "Rules"

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management "Rules" | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Rule #1:  My Big Fat KM

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Based upon the 2002 movie, "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" and referring to the father, Gus Portokalos, who says, "Give me a word, any word, and show you that the root of that word is Greek."  And he does just that throughout the entire movie.  Gus uses this "schtick" to not only show how "everything is Greek" but more importantly he uses it to show how it all ties to the bigger picture and the point that he is actually making at the moment.


"My Big Fat KM" suggests that you shouldn't claim that everything is KM or even that KM should be used everywhere or for everything.  Don't approach every problem as if it were a KM problem, and instead look for how KM can help provide a solution to someone's problem.


Rule #1 is all about NOT looking for KM problems, and instead looking for problems that can be "fixed" by applying KM.  Knowledge Management is all about creating value-added benefit within the organization.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's KM Tips

Dr. Dan's KM Tips | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Quick tips for improving your Knowledge Management implementation.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Story Telling Community:  Create a group of individuals within the organization that gets together for the purpose of developing their story telling skills and abilities.


Story Telling is a powerful tool to use to transfer existing knowledge within an organizatin.  Telling stories about how things are done (or not), or about what has happened in the organization's past (general history, successes and challenges) is an effective way to help everyone learn more about the organization.


Supports:  Knowledge Sharing, Knowledge Capture, Knowledge Transfer, Networking, Collaboration, Organizational Culture.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Dr. Dan Kirsch
Scoop.it!

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan: As Nick Bontis often points out, information overload.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

"In your thirst for knowledge, be sure not to drown in all the information."


(Anthony J. D Angelo)

more...
No comment yet.