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Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management
Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management
Knowledge Management viewpoints and curations by a world-wide recognized Knowledge Management Expert and Consultant: President/CEO of Knowledge Management Professional Society (KMPro) - the world's largest KM professional society; Creator of the first KM certification program and remains today after 20 years as the world's longest serving provider of Knowledge Management training and certification with more than 6,500 individuals certified and more than 3,000 in other KM training.
Curated by Dr. Dan Kirsch

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Toyota is becoming more efficient by replacing robots with humans - all about the VALUE of Knowledge

Toyota is becoming more efficient by replacing robots with humans - all about the VALUE of Knowledge | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Toyota is becoming more efficient by replacing robots with humans.
Toyota's latest strategy has two main aspects. First ... “To be the master of the machine, you have to have the knowledge and the skills to teach the machine.” ...

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

This Toyota story is all about the importance of knowledge to the organization, the need to utilize knowledge to produce innovations and increase efficiencies, and the recognition that people, not machines, bring quality to Toyota through their knowledge and experience.


I talk to this in every single training workshop that I conduct -- Toyota's consistency in maintaining high levels of quality is all about how they use their people and how they engage their knowledge.

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Julie Ekner Koch's curator insight, April 8, 5:33 AM

Toyota has been a first-mover for at long time...interesting to see if other companies follow this trend.

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Rapid Equipping Force launches website for innovations - United States Army (press release)

Rapid Equipping Force launches website for innovations - United States Army (press release) | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Rapid Equipping Force launches website for innovations
United States Army (press release)
They explained that the website was created to capture ideas of Soldiers with recent combat experience. "Right now, the Army is filled with ...
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Interesting approach to collaboration and innovation.

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Opportunity-Driven Networking to Increase Collaboration

Opportunity-Driven Networking to Increase Collaboration | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
@kjeannette they are all works in progress, though each usually gets a unique name, e.g. how works get done http://t.co/Kpy3ptqkF3
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

I think that this is a rather interesting concept conveyed quite simply -- that Social Networks increase Opportunity-Driven collaboration through informal networks.


I believe though that within the innovation driven organization that the "sweet spot" however may actually be where the overlapping occurs between Communities of Practice (CoP) and Social Networks.


My basis for that thought is that we know that new knowledge fuels innovation.  And we've learned through many years of studying the impact that increasing the degree and depth of networking has upon knowledge capture, knowledge transfer and those relationships to developing new knowledge (e.g., Nonaka's SECI model).  I think then that by increasing the network connectivity to the CoPs as well as the  networking within the CoPs and the organization itself, that you will see exponential increased exposure to new knowledge that can be applied to not only solving existing problems but to make those disruptive leaps.  


An example of this application could be to consider pursuit of Best Practice where unless your organization is asleep at the wheel, you should already be aware of an applicable industry-wide best practice.  So the real gain can be found by seeking those Best Practices that come from outside of your industry -- that is the "diversity of ideas" meets the need to "solve problems."



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A Better Travel Neck Pillow : Right Knowledge Presents Right Solution

A Better Travel Neck Pillow : Right Knowledge Presents Right Solution | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
It's called the Nap Anywhere, and the doctor who invented it promises it's far more comfortable — and easier to pack — than the standard inflatable U-shaped travel pillow you know well.
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

To Create a Better End Product, Bring the Right Knowledge to the Problem!


It's amazing what can come of bringing end user knowledge, coupled with subject matter expertise into the problem solving equation.  It would be delightful if organizations considered creating knowledge repositories and portals with the same approach!

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Rethinking the Work of Leadership

Rethinking the Work of Leadership | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Here we are in 2013 with organizational leadership models that continue to deny the social nature of organizations and wallow in inertia.

 

Our leadership practices remain authoritative. People are disengaged, distrusting and perhaps even disenfranchised.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Dr. Dan Kirsch
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

If it were only so in the land of Dilbert.  Unfortunately this is pervasive in many organizations - lack of trust, lack of sharing knowledge and no collaboration all go hand in hand and are together the tools of a failure to innovate.

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Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, July 14, 2013 5:44 AM

If it were only so in the land of Dilbert.  Unfortunately this is pervasive in many organizations - lack of trust, lack of sharing knowledge and no collaboration all go hand in hand and are together the tools of a failure to innovate.

Andy Brough's comment, July 15, 2013 1:24 AM
Leaders will need to work hard to create a deeper sense of engagement, trust and empowerment
AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, July 25, 2013 5:31 AM

Wonderul Scoop Kenneth!  I am currently working on understanding inclusion by exploring exclusion and this is absolutely perfect!  

 

While we may have a "diverse" employee base"  if we have authoritative and distrusting cultures, it is impossible to have inclusion!

 

 

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Is Too Much Collaboration a Bad Thing? - NPR

Is Too Much Collaboration a Bad Thing? - NPR | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Is Too Much Collaboration a Bad Thing?
NPR
Jason Fried thinks deeply about collaboration, productivity and the nature of work. He's the co-founder of 37signals, which builds web-based collaboration tools.
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Interesting.  When I first saw the title I thought, hmmm....too much collaboration? Should be interesting.  But one quote really stood out:  "If people don't have time to think.  And thinking time needs to be your own time, then they have a really hard time actually producing great work."

 

And I have to agree with that.  Collaboration yes, great stuff.  And you certainly have to allow for those "unscheduled" opportunities that account for "wow, I have to share this great idea with someone!" moments.  But clearly you also need to have the time to be able to think.  To ponder.  To daydream.  To stare at the white fluffy clouds.  And let your imagination roam freely.

 

That reminds me of an article that I used to have posted in my training break room (someone snagged it so I've long since lost the exact title) but it was about just that -- having time to think.  The author suggested that when we try to schedule every single moment you then have left no time to think.  No time to move to that deep thought where your mind tumbles around the various possibilities that exist, all the "what-ifs" that may be out there.  And so on.

 

So....ensuring that you allow for and take time to produce/do great work, absolutely!  Good stuff.

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Mindy M Walker's curator insight, July 13, 2013 7:32 AM

Some thoughts worth considering if you're in an environment that promotes collaboration above individual creativity at every turn.

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Innovate or perish. It’s the new business reality. Is your company ready? | Innovation Management

Innovate or perish. It’s the new business reality. Is your company ready? | Innovation Management | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Innovation isn’t a natural mindset for most leaders—or for the companies they work for—but the good news is that innovation can be learned.
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

And unfortunately not everyone seems to "get" it yet:  "...today’s competitive advantage may become tomorrow’s albatross unless leaders make innovation a strategic priority."

 

And of course the other side of the same coin is that any organization that fails to cultivate and utilize its unique knowledge is much more likely to become that albatross.

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Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, July 8, 2013 7:54 AM

And unfortunately not everyone seems to "get" it yet:  "...today’s competitive advantage may become tomorrow’s albatross unless leaders make innovation a strategic priority."

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The collaboration bell curve | Change Manager Digital Collaboration

The collaboration bell curve | Change Manager Digital Collaboration | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
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Gerald King, MKMP, CISSP, MOF's comment, July 9, 2013 11:14 AM
A trigger is a trivial part of a weapon but it won't perform its function (go bang) without that little part that never even touches the ammunition.
Dr. Dan Kirsch's comment, July 9, 2013 11:25 AM
That sounds almost mystical Jerry! :-) And true!
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Going the Way of the Organizational Dodo Bird

Going the Way of the Organizational Dodo Bird | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

6 Key Considerations to Avoid Going the Way of the Organizational Dodo Bird

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Cosmina Coman's comment, June 23, 2013 12:05 PM
This is the message shown onto my screen when trying to access this link: "Forbidden - Users from your country are not permitted to browse this site."
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6 Ways To Create A Culture Of Innovation

6 Ways To Create A Culture Of Innovation | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Every organization is designed to get the results it gets. Poor performance comes from a poorly designed organization.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Great little read!

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Tiffany Crosby's curator insight, June 13, 2013 6:03 AM

Bring structure to unstructured time and innovation with intent is critical. Innovation just for the sake of innovation with no potential use or market is just a hobby. 

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Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management (KM) Tips

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management (KM) Tips | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it


Quick tips for improving your Knowledge Management implementation.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Speed Innovation:  Set aside some scheduled time during the month where employees are encouraged to make mini-pitches to management.  These are short (maximum of 2-3 minutes each) pitches to provide an opportunity to someone who would perhaps never be in a position to be able to pitch an idea to management to be able to do just that.


Supports: Collaboration, Organizational Culture, Knowledge Sharing, Innovation.

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What Is It? game 301

What Is It? game 301 | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
It's once again time for our collaboration with the wonderfully entertaining What Is It? Blog. Do you know what the pictured item is? Can you make up something wonderfully wacky?
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Interesting idea!  I always suggest that organizations conduct innovation exercises during which you suspend some hard and fast rule or such, and then make up a new way of conducting business.  The premise being that it's easier to learn to be innovative and creative PRIOR to that urgent need (such as an "end of your world" deadline that drops from the sky).  And I think that this is a great additional way to play the same sort of developing creativity game!

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Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes

Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management Quotes | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Dr. Dan: Organizational knowledge is the fuel that drives the innovation engine.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

"Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes.  It is best to admit them quickly, and get on with improving your other innovations."


(Steve Jobs)

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Knowledge Sharing: How ‘Business As Usual’ Is Killing Innovation

Knowledge Sharing: How ‘Business As Usual’ Is Killing Innovation | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Life is one ongoing, dynamic learning process; an evolutionary marathon superseding any one person or generation.  So how is it that we often forget to share our knowledge and pass our learned experiences, successes and failures down to the...
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

This blog post discusses the impact of failure to share knowledge, but at the same time neatly summarizes the relationship between knowledge sharing, new knowledge and innovation.


"As Hong et al. 2011 put it: 'The main goal of knowledge sharing between individuals is to generate new knowledge, resulting in new combinations of existing individual, shared or organizational knowledge.’ Hence, it is important for an organization to focus on knowledge transfer, since it is a requirement to innovate, to stay competitive and to avoid duplication."


Absolutely.


The post also outlines four stages in Knowledge Transfer:

  1. Initiation; recognizing the opportunity to share knowledge when a knowledge gap is discovered.
  2. Implementation; focuses on the exchange of information and resources between source and recipient and results in the decision to proceed.
  3. Ramp-up; the recipient will start to use the new knowledge when an unexpected problem opens a window of opportunity to put the transferred knowledge into practice.
  4. Integration; when the use of the new knowledge becomes routine and problems encountered are dealt with to achieve and preserve the new status quo.


Which I believe is expressed a bit differently from the typical "goals" of knowledge transfer:

  • Organize
  • Create
  • Capture or distribute
  • Ensure availability


A challenge of knowledge sharing or transfer of course is that it is not literally possible to directly "transfer" knowledge gained through experience (experiential knowledge), and so consideration must be given to how exactly that knowledge can be shared or transferred.


Steve Trautman presented a nice analysis of what knowledge transfer is and is not that I won't simply repeat here but it's definitely worth a read if your organization still struggles to understand.  But I think that one major impediment of innovation is that organizations still are not clear on the relationships between knowledge sharing/transfer and new knowledge and innovation.  


Absent that sense of need there may be little motivation to spend time trying to understand the challenges of knowledge sharing/transfer, much less trying to improve the organizational abilities to do so.

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Mindy M Walker's curator insight, July 27, 2013 9:04 AM

KM without sharing, reflection and integration is ineffective.

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Think Carefully About Where You Put the Office Bathroom

Think Carefully About Where You Put the Office Bathroom | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

"Why the placement of your office bathroom matters."

Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

SBP:  Strategic Bathroom Placement.  But it's not truly about where a bathroom is located so much as it is about creating a physical environment that provides ample opportunity for people to interact, and then encouraging and allowing that interaction.  Apple, Google, 3M and others have all turned this concept into an organizational "way of life" but you don't always have to go to that extent to take advantage of the knowledge sharing brought about by socialization.  Little things can help to shape the environment, to nuture the roots of collaboration.  

 

Take for example, "Beer Cart Friday" at Advance Medical (http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/03/08/beer-cart-friday/1973789/) where CEO Jennifer Fuicelli uses -- yes, beer as a catalyst for creating a high performing corporate culture.  She's also incorporated costumes on Halloween, cookouts and what she calls a "get out of jail free" card used by employees to receive a paid day off on their birthday.

 

Organizational cultures that support socialization and collaboration create something extremely important -- trust amongst those who you spend a significant chunk of your life with.  Trust and sharing knowledge go hand in hand.  Sharing knowledge and collaboration are what fuel organizations such as Apple, Google and 3M, and it's clearly one critical part of their innovation generating machines.

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Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, July 14, 2013 5:08 AM

SBP:  Strategic Bathroom Placement.  But it's not truly about where a bathroom is located so much as it is about creating a physical environment that provides ample opportunity for people to interact, and then encouraging and allowing that interaction.  Apple, Google, 3M and others have all turned this concept into an organizational "way of life" but you don't always have to go to that extent to take advantage of the knowledge sharing brought about by socialization.  Little things can help to shape the environment, to nuture the roots of collaboration.  

 

Take for example, "Beer Cart Friday" at Advance Medical (http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/03/08/beer-cart-friday/1973789/) where CEO Jennifer Fuicelli uses -- yes, beer as a catalyst for creating a high performing corporate culture.  She's also incorporated costumes on Halloween, cookouts and what she calls a "get out of jail free" card used by employees to receive a paid day off on their birthday.

 

Organizational cultures that support socialization and collaboration create something extremely important -- trust amongst those who you spend a significant chunk of your life with.  Trust and sharing knowledge go hand in hand.  Sharing knowledge and collaboration are what fuel organizations such as Apple, Google and 3M, and it's clearly one critical part of their innovation generating machines.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, July 14, 2013 5:08 AM

SBP:  Strategic Bathroom Placement.  But it's not truly about where a bathroom is located so much as it is about creating a physical environment that provides ample opportunity for people to interact, and then encouraging and allowing that interaction.  Apple, Google, 3M and others have all turned this concept into an organizational "way of life" but you don't always have to go to that extent to take advantage of the knowledge sharing brought about by socialization.  Little things can help to shape the environment, to nuture the roots of collaboration.  

 

Take for example, "Beer Cart Friday" at Advance Medical (http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/03/08/beer-cart-friday/1973789/) where CEO Jennifer Fuicelli uses -- yes, beer as a catalyst for creating a high performing corporate culture.  She's also incorporated costumes on Halloween, cookouts and what she calls a "get out of jail free" card used by employees to receive a paid day off on their birthday.

 

Organizational cultures that support socialization and collaboration create something extremely important -- trust amongst those who you spend a significant chunk of your life with.  Trust and sharing knowledge go hand in hand.  Sharing knowledge and collaboration are what fuel organizations such as Apple, Google and 3M, and it's clearly one critical part of their innovation generating machines.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, July 14, 2013 5:08 AM

SBP:  Strategic Bathroom Placement.  But it's not truly about where a bathroom is located so much as it is about creating a physical environment that provides ample opportunity for people to interact, and then encouraging and allowing that interaction.  Apple, Google, 3M and others have all turned this concept into an organizational "way of life" but you don't always have to go to that extent to take advantage of the knowledge sharing brought about by socialization.  Little things can help to shape the environment, to nuture the roots of collaboration.  

 

Take for example, "Beer Cart Friday" at Advance Medical (http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/03/08/beer-cart-friday/1973789/) where CEO Jennifer Fuicelli uses -- yes, beer as a catalyst for creating a high performing corporate culture.  She's also incorporated costumes on Halloween, cookouts and what she calls a "get out of jail free" card used by employees to receive a paid day off on their birthday.

 

Organizational cultures that support socialization and collaboration create something extremely important -- trust amongst those who you spend a significant chunk of your life with.  Trust and sharing knowledge go hand in hand.  Sharing knowledge and collaboration are what fuel organizations such as Apple, Google and 3M, and it's clearly one critical part of their innovation generating machines.

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Balancing Innovation via Organizational Ambidexterity - Innovation Excellence (blog)

Balancing Innovation via Organizational Ambidexterity - Innovation Excellence (blog) | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
Balancing Innovation via Organizational Ambidexterity
Innovation Excellence (blog)
Commonly, incremental innovation is defined as the refinement, improvement, and exploitation of existing technology, offerings and business models.
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

Radical and incremental Innovation – two types of innovation that I've been stressing for a long time, and the need to balance both.


And for those who've been through my KM certification workshop, this should sound all too familiar with regard to our discussions on balancing knowledge strategy approaches.

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Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, July 12, 2013 4:17 AM

Radical and incremental Innovation – two types of innovation that I've been stressing for a long time, and the need to balance both.

 

And for those who've been through my KM certification workshop, this should sound all too familiar with regard to our discussions on balancing knowledge strategy approaches.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, July 12, 2013 4:17 AM

Radical and incremental Innovation – two types of innovation that I've been stressing for a long time, and the need to balance both.

 

And for those who've been through my KM certification workshop, this should sound all too familiar with regard to our discussions on balancing knowledge strategy approaches.

Dr. Dan Kirsch's curator insight, July 12, 2013 4:17 AM

Radical and incremental Innovation – two types of innovation that I've been stressing for a long time, and the need to balance both.

 

And for those who've been through my KM certification workshop, this should sound all too familiar with regard to our discussions on balancing knowledge strategy approaches.

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5 Signs that Your Organization is Truly Committed to Innovation

5 Signs that Your Organization is Truly Committed to Innovation | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

Companies say they want to innovate… but are they truly committed? Since so much in an organization inherently works against successful innovation, an organization has to truly be committed to the innovation effort to move beyond a list of “good ideas” into successful commercialization. How can you tell if your organization is truly committed to innovation?  Here are some signs to look for. - See more at: http://www.cloverleafinnovation.com/blog/5-signs-organization-committed-innovation/#sthash.kvnmmkEM.dpuf


Via Peter Verschuere
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

And pretty much the same can be said about organizational committment to Knowledge Management (that what supports KM).

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Enterra Insights: Innovation: Tinkers, Tailors, Soldiers, and Spies

Enterra Insights: Innovation: Tinkers, Tailors, Soldiers, and Spies | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it
The great thing about innovators is that they come in all shapes and sizes. Some pundits believe great innovators share certain traits or habits, but beyond that, trying to describe what makes a great innovator is nearly impossible.
Dr. Dan Kirsch's insight:

So which are you?

 

Explorer

"The Explorer's job is to collect the raw material for creativity. He is constantly asking questions, talking to different people, and processing as many inputs as possible."

Commenting on a Booz & Company study about corporate R&D spending, Gijs van Wulfen concludes that it is critical for companies to have explorers. The Booz & Company calls them "Need Seekers," because they find out what customers really need. Van Wulfen writes, "Need seeking is essential, because a good innovation is a simple solution to a relevant customer need." ["The best innovators are need seekers," LinkedIn, 12 November 2013]

Artist

"The Artist takes the raw material from the Explorer and combines it in new and interesting ways. He's playful and imaginative with no concerns about judging the quality of what he's creating."

When it comes to innovation, the artists that are most often involved are designers. To give you a sense of how important designers are in the innovation process, read a post I wrote back in 2007 entitled The Medici Effect and New Design. The only quibble I have with von Oech about the description of artists is that designers ARE concerned about the quality of what they create. Good designers create objects that are both beautiful and functional. Steve Jobs once said, "Technology alone is not enough. It's technology married with liberal arts that yields us the result that makes our hearts sing."

Judge

"The Judge takes the Artist's ideas and determines if they're practical. He thinks critically and realistically about what can actually be done."

Judges are often also referred to as "Gatekeepers." Gatekeepers are important because they are able to kill bad ideas before bad ideas kill the company. Cross, Hargadon, Parise, and Thomas note, "Very often, these gatekeepers hold their esteemed position for good reason -- they have technical expertise or other skills that have served the company well." But they caution that not all gatekeepers are good gatekeepers. "They may not be the best judges of new ideas, and their expertise in one area may in fact blind them to innovations in other areas."

 

Warrior "The Warrior takes an idea the Judge has determined worthy and tenaciously follows it to completion. The Warrior's job is to overcome resistance, be courageous, and ship the idea." Warriors are often referred to as innovation champions. For more on that subject, read my post entitled Making Everyone an Innovation Champion. As I wrote in that post, "Supporting innovation champions with more than words and back slaps is important. 'In order for innovation to flourish in your organization,' writes Chuck Ferry, 'your innovation champions must be supported through properly structured responsibilities, goals and resources. Otherwise, they will leave to pursue other opportunities, taking their energy and ideas with them.' ["Cultivating Innovation Champions," Innovation - See more at: http://enterpriseresilienceblog.typepad.com/enterprise_resilience_man/2013/06/innovation-tinkers-tailors-soldiers-spies.html#sthash.bbXGp3gD.dpuf

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Study Demonstrates the Link Between Collaboration & Growth

Study Demonstrates the Link Between Collaboration & Growth | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

A recent study by Andy Cosh and Joanne Jin Zhang of the UK Innovation Research centre set out to examine how companies were using open innovation. The report makes a thought-provoking comparison of the innovation styles of companies. It indicates that those companies that are active in open innovation in both giving and receiving ideas achieve higher rates of innovation and of revenue growth.


Via Peter Verschuere
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Carl Heine's curator insight, June 19, 2013 8:17 AM

From the blog: "The clearest is that companies that choose an open style to internal and external exchange of information, ideas and technologies achieve the highest rates of product innovation and growth." The study would be worth reading.


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The Inside and Outside View of Innovation

The Inside and Outside View of Innovation | Dr. Dan's Knowledge Management | Scoop.it

 

How can companies ensure that a promising initiative receives the necessary resources? And why do so many brilliant inventions fail while other seemingly mediocre offerings succeed? Such questions are addressed in two recent books — Unrelenting Innovation: How to Build a Culture for Market Dominance, by Gerard J. Tellis and The Wide Lens: A New Strategy for Innovation, by Ron Adner. The first book concentrates on a company’s internal workings, while the latter focuses on its external environment.

 

In Unrelenting Innovation, Tellis asserts that the single most important driver of innovation in any organization is its culture, and he cites three organizational traits important for innovation: a willingness to cannibalize existing products, a risk-taking attitude and the ability to focus on the future. Many companies have a hard time commercializing radical innovations, Tellis notes, because these would hurt the company’s existing products. To counter such tendencies, Tellis offers three practices: providing the right incentives, fostering internal markets and empowering “innovation champions” within the organization.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 12, 2013 4:06 PM

Two recent books focus on different aspects of innovation — within and outside the organization.

ksraju's curator insight, June 13, 2013 5:50 AM

innovation is key for growth and Life echo system. every new learning or struggle for existence will create innovation.