Knowledge Nuggets
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Knowledge Nuggets
Scooping up nuggets like Pac-Man! KNuggets is a curated board of ideas, innovations, and resources on Knowledge Management, Communication, Collaboration, and Learning.
Curated by Victor Jimenez
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How To Turn Employees Into Active Users Of Corporate Knowledge | KMInstitute

How To Turn Employees Into Active Users Of Corporate Knowledge | KMInstitute | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
Victor Jimenez's insight:
This article is shaped well and serves as a great reminder of why Knowledge Managers need to spend time on keeping the organization's knowledge assets relevant and easy to use. I think the real trick to maintaining relevant and up-to-date knowledge has to be distributed responsibility. You should not depend on the Content Manager(s) alone to identify when an asset needs an update. There are way too many changes in a live environment for a few people to keep up with and there is always one more perspective to consider to improve relevancy.

Over the last few years I have begun to study the Knowledge Centered Service (KCS) perspective provided by the Consortium for Service Innovation. http://www.serviceinnovation.org/kcs/ ;

In KCS, the concept of collective ownership is an important element in what makes an organization effective at creating and maintaining knowledge. The Consortium for Service Innovation describes collective ownership in the following way, "
Collective ownership is a key driver of the efficiency of the KCS processes and contributes to knowledge quality and freshness. If knowledge workers take responsibility for the quality and accuracy of the knowledge they interact with, the knowledge that is being used is constantly being updated.

The concept of collective ownership applies to all who use the knowledge. In environments where the intended audience for knowledge includes people outside of the organization, like partners or customers, they too are part of the collective ownership model. Allowing them to improve or at least comment on knowledge, based on their experience with that knowledge, is important.
"

To me this means that anyone who uses a knowledge asset has the opportunity to improve it by providing their perspective (i.e submitting a comment). So if we make it easy for workers to comment on a knowledge asset, we can gather distributed perspectives and use them to improve the asset to be more relevant for the organization.

Maintaining knowledge assets in a distributed manner where users buy in to the concept of collective ownership and provide small amounts of insight through use over time seems natural. Why don't we do it more?
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DARPA Wants to Help You Search the Web Better

DARPA Wants to Help You Search the Web Better | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
DARPA has kicked off a project to fine tune web searches by topical domain rather than subject. By Bob Brewin
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Victor Jimenez's curator insight, February 11, 2014 1:46 PM

Thanks to Bob Brewin for posting the original link on defenseone.com!

 

[FYI….pardon my citations in this post, I am trying to practice my APA citation-ing (sp?) for better writing]

 

DARPA’s recent Broad Agency Announcement on the intent of the Memex program, DARPA-BAA-14-21, calls for innovative assistance from industry to fill the gap in current search technology. The announcement is basically a Request For Proposals (RFP) which DARPA will evaluate industry interest and response on potential solutions. Some of the DARPA views on this gap left by current search technology, as specified in the announcement, is that the technology “is limited by a one-size-fits-all approach [which provides] a centralized search [with] limitations in the scope of what gets indexed and the richness of available details ... common practice misses information in the deep web and ignores shared content across pages.” (2014, p.4)

 

In their own words, the agency’s goals for new software seem to be focused at developing new ideas and practices for “domain-specific web content indexing and search, democratizing the creation of an index and inventing better methods for interacting with and sharing information.” (2014, p. 5)

 

The intent is to move past the manual method of searching for a match between exact key words located in a centralized index, and towards a future where a search can reach the large volume deep web content such as temporary or unconnected pages or content which has already been aggregated, normalized, or otherwise already impacted when used for analysis.

 

DARPA has expressed that their intent is not to develop a new and invasive technology for monitoring individual behavior of citizens. DARPA’s specific comment in the announcement is as follows, “The Memex program is specifically not interested in proposals for the following: attributing anonymous services, deanonymizing or attributing identity to servers or IP addresses, or gaining access to information which is not intended to be publicly available.” (2014, 5)

 

I think the intent is to find a better way of doing what we already do on the internet, which is accessing a vast amount of knowledge in a simple manner and with an expectation for finding a relevant result to our questions. I, for one, can believe their intent is genuine and the desire to find new ways of spying on citizens is not present here. After all, how else are we going to be able to have the AI-like interfaces (like JARVIS from Marvel’s series of Iron Man movies or the ship’s computer from the Star Trek the Next Generation television shows)? If we hope to verbally interface through unstructured or colloquial styles as we see in our favorite sci-fi shows, we need to give our tech some type of logic to get the answers we need.

 

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. (2014) Broad Agency Announcement: Memex (DARPA Funding Opportunity No. DARPA-BAA-14-21). Retrieved on February 11, 2014 from URL: http://go.usa.gov/BBc5

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The fallow fallacy of Knowledge Management

The fallow fallacy of Knowledge Management | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
The fallow fallacy of Knowledge Management
Victor Jimenez's insight:

"What is KM and why is it different than what we are already doing?"

 

I had this conversation yesterday and to some length. As I read this article, I recalled some of the barriers to understanding and communicating that were encountered in this chat. The most difficult concept to convey appropriately to my discussion partner had to do with "the why" of KM - as in "why to do it" - and describe the why in a manner that is different from the answer used to explain the purpose for strategic planning or for leadership development or even for process improvement activities. We finally settled on an answer to "the why" that was rooted in the capability for innovation and being ready for what comes next.

 

As I've considered some of the lessons Dr. Griffiths has conveyed in his 2013/14 change capability series (you can find the first entry at http://knowcademy.com/2013/12/27/1-core-capability-that-needs-to-be-developed-in-2014/ ;) I have found that some improvement on my approach to introducing KM to others is needed. 

What I've taken away as a good learning nugget from this last conversation I've had on KM is that, to get the value of KM conversation started in the right direction, it may be best to lead with the topics of Change Management and the Need for Innovation. These concepts and their descriptors seem to have more traction and understanding and can serve as the language gateway to the greater discussion on KM. Most managers I meet have a level of acceptance already about Change as a constant in the organization and that being ready to respond quickly to new challenges is what can set a firm apart from their competitors.

 

I'll have to try something different and along these lines for my next conversation on KM. Hopefully I'll see the light bulb come on earlier when talking about change and the rest of the discussion will resemble something closer to this....."So we can agree that we need to be ready for change and that new opportunities and challenges can be found in all parts/all levels of the organization. Now wouldn't it be great if everyone in the organization had a common framework or decision-making mindset to use in applying context to new challenges? Yes you say? Well let's talk about some ideas of how to put that together for your firm...."

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Hopes for productivity revival in sharing economy - San Francisco Chronicle

Hopes for productivity revival in sharing economy - San Francisco Chronicle | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
Hopes for productivity revival in sharing economy San Francisco Chronicle "This has all the hallmarks of a disruptive technology for a bunch of industries that have never had to think about disruptive technologies," said Nicholas Colas, chief...

Via Fred Zimny
Victor Jimenez's insight:

This concept of the Sharing Economy is interesting. Other than privacy and risk of damage/loss, I wonder what will be important factors for deciding to participate from the perspective of the owners of property? 

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Joseph E. Stiglitz argues that the impact of technological change on living standards has become increasingly unclear. - Project Syndicate

Joseph E. Stiglitz argues that the impact of technological change on living standards has become increasingly unclear. - Project Syndicate | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
Around the world, there is enormous enthusiasm for the type of technological innovation symbolized by Silicon Valley, with many attempting to replicate the ingenuity that they regard as America’s true comparative advantage. But there is a puzzle: it is difficult to detect the benefits of this innovation in GDP statistics.
Victor Jimenez's insight:

Managing knowledge is an act which demonstrates what it means to be innovative. Innovation is Knowledge Management.

 

Early adopters to the belief that we are moving into a Knowledge-Based Economy will have an advantage. Their challenge will always be to identify ROI for managing knowledge to those who doubt it's value. What evidence must be gathered? What must be measured? Are our current indicators appropriate for assessing the value of innovation (and Knowledge Management)? For a Knowledge Manager, these questions must be continually asked and revised as they apply to an organization.

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How Innovative Companies Collaborate

How Innovative Companies Collaborate | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
For highly innovative group collaborations, do what the big tech firms do: Cycle through collaborations with different pairs and take the long view.

Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Victor Jimenez's insight:

From the author....

"...successful collaborations rotated control of the project back and forth between [two] partners. This rotating partnership worked better than domineering or consensus-based approaches where a single partner controlled all phases of the collaboration or the partners shared control of every phase"

 

Would this concept simply be able to be mixed in with Agile Development process and rotate leadership through phases of the development lifecycle? Has this been tried before?

 

I'd be interested in hearing stories from teams who have applied this rotating concept. Please feel free to comment here on your story(ies) of this collaboration method.

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Innovation Management IS Your Business | Switch and Shift

Innovation Management IS Your Business | Switch and Shift | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
While the old saying, "If it isn't broken, don't fix it" makes for a great sound bite, it can cause irreparable harm to a company's ability to remain competitive if adopted as an operating philosophy.
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Victor Jimenez's curator insight, January 4, 2014 2:14 PM

I can't think of a better way to start a conversation on the value of Knowledge Management than how innovation is presented in this article.

Marie Jeffery's curator insight, February 20, 2014 10:52 AM

Victor, thanks for sharing this valuable insight.

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5 Smart Technology Trends That Will Transform Our Daily Lives

5 Smart Technology Trends That Will Transform Our Daily Lives | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
IBM's annual 5-in-5 predicts what smart technologies will change our lives in the next half decade.
Victor Jimenez's insight:

Most can agree that smarter is better when it comes to making technology more effective. But does "smarter" just mean using what we already know more effectively or does "smarter" have to do with implementing new discoveries and making big changes to how things are down altogether? Most of the time when I hear someone say "Smart Technology" they are referring to making existing tech multi-use or faster or both.

 

Of the five examples on this list, #1 Smarter Classrooms, really seems to be where technology is making it possible for big change in the way education is provided. The mentioned Khan Academy example has shown us this and is where we see the concept of the flipped classroom where students are in charge of their learning path rather than the educators. In this case, I'd say "smarter" means more than just better or faster, but means education revisited or education 2.0. Will big changes happen in the next 5 years? I think so, I think we are already seeing it.

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