Knowledge Nuggets
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Knowledge Nuggets
Scooping up nuggets like Pac-Man! KNuggets is a curated board of ideas, innovations, and resources on Knowledge Management, Communication, Collaboration, and Learning.
Curated by Victor Jimenez
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KMA-DC Meeting 1/29/2016 - TalkingPoints & Recap

KMA-DC Meeting 1/29/2016 - TalkingPoints & Recap | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
Examining Roles for Knowledge Management What are the roles needed to perform Knowledge Management in an organization? Hint: There is no single correct answer to this question. Rather, we can take a l...
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Notes from the KMA-DC meeting on 1/29/2016. Last page includes a capture of our discussion and identifies gaps for future talks and investigation.

 

Sources cited and feedback welcomed!

 

Contact: Victor Jimenez, Email: vjime2728@gmail.com

Please reference: KMA-DC Meeting 1/29/2016 on your inquiry

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Natural language: The de-facto interface convention for social robotics | Robohub

Natural language: The de-facto interface convention for social robotics | Robohub | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
of a computer design. Interface will continue to be an important and valuable element of robotic design as well. The

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Victor Jimenez's curator insight, January 25, 2015 1:11 PM

This article by Mark Stephen Meadows provides an interesting look at the next stage of challenges in designing better ways for humans and machines to communicate. Sci-fi fans who are interested in the future of Artificial Intelligence may want to read more about Mr. Meadow’s insights. I’ve found the topic to provide great inspiration for ideas on what the future may hold and perhaps, how we should approach design of this technology. Check this article out and see where your mind takes you!

 

My own mind trail took me back to the design of language processing for an artificial system…

 

Per Wikipedia, Natural Language Processing (NLP) is a field of computer science, artificial intelligence, and linguistics concerned with the interactions between computers and human (natural) languages. The intent of NLP seems to be to find a better way for computers to understand human, natural language inputs.

 

To enhance knowledge management systems in organizations, I’ve been looking into the importance of language use strategy to enhance communication. While there is much to review on this topic, I’ve settled on beginning with effective communication through word choices among teams. This influences the design of IT systems which support those teams.

 

Some of my own novice level writings on this subject covered the following,

“A controlled vocabulary (CV) deserves attention from data administrators in any operational environment since a CV is essential to perform the search and retrieval activities required of effective communication and knowledge transfer. This is especially true among human-to-machine communication where at least one side of an exchange (for now I say it is only the human side) must apply their own tacit knowledge of the subject to choose terms for searching and for qualifying a search result. The effectiveness of these exchanges depends on the degree of similarity in the choice of term made by the indexer and the choice forwarded by the searcher. A CV is an effective method of improving the similarities of indexer and searcher choices, thereby enhancing communication.”

 

One (among many) difficulty in designing a vocabulary for machines to use when communicating with humans via natural language would be: Keeping the language relevant. A CV must reflect all the world views of it’s users for the time in which it is to be used. Now, given that people’s views on ANY given subject are constantly changing; design teams must continually update CVs to maintain their usefulness

 

These comments draw from the author’s research on the topic and further details on cited resources/references can be found at: https://www.academia.edu/10325048/Considerations_For_The_Creation_Of_A_Vocabulary_For_Knowledge_Sharing

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A 12 point model for Knowledge Management | LinkedIn

A 12 point model for Knowledge Management | LinkedIn | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
Victor Jimenez's insight:

Good tips on the value of KM from David Griffiths, PhD. I especially see #12 as critical to KM success in any organization. The realization that sharing of information is a business need among all areas of the organization is not something that comes naturally to most. Yet those who can step outside their domain and see the greater context have a better chance of making the best decisions for their mission the first time around.

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Failure in Social Leadership: a case study for Mozilla

Failure in Social Leadership: a case study for Mozilla | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
When Brendan Eich, newly installed boss at Mozilla resigned this week after only a month in role, it was largely because of a failure by that organisation to recognise the realities of the Social A...
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From the article...

 

"[I]n the Social Age, the gap between formal and social spaces is blurred, and highly transparent, so what we do in all contexts counts."


An excellently phrased quote from Mr. Julian Stodd on the reality of social leadership.


The blurred gap between formal and social spaces is a challenge that all leaders will have to monitor and manage.


What do your social spaces say about you? (hopefully what you want them to since you have been incrementally building them) What do your formal spaces say about you?

Now, if you consider that one affects the other, are you still on message?

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Dispelling Myths around Project Sponsorship

Dispelling Myths around Project Sponsorship | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
PM Center Insider Dispelling Myths around Project Sponsorship – by Radhia Benalia, PhDc, PMP, Certified Green Belt Radhia Benalia is a pracademic. In addition to filling a leading position in a reg...
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Being in different levels of leadership roles among the collection of communities I am engaged in at the moment, I found these Myths on Project Sponsorship intriguing. There always seems to be a challenge in finding the proper balance for leadership on a project. Should the leader communicate more to ensure we stay on track? Or should they stay out of the way and let the team execute and learn? There is no one-size fits all answer, but situational awareness is of course always needed.

 

So I am left with concluding that clear communication about scope and objectives up front is of utmost importance. But here is the next question I get to....As a sponsor, if I am satisfied that I have laid out the objectives clearly and the team is informed, then I can leave them to execute their plan. I only interrupt flow or work to perform whatever level of monitoring we (the sponsor and the project manager) have agreed to beforehand. Ok, no problem there. But inevitably the time comes when something changes one of the objectives we started with. Perhaps an external influence out of our control. What are my priorities as the sponsor at this time? How much do I now need to get involved? I obviously have to inform the team of the change and how it may now impact the objectives we previously discussed. But how do I decide how much I need to get involved to ensure the team has addressed the change? Or do I just identify the change, identify the adjusted objective, and let the team get back to planning?

 

What are some tips on how to make this decision? Thoughts?

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Narrative and storytelling in Social Leadership

Narrative and storytelling in Social Leadership | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
It's because stories sit at the heart of how we communicate that i've included 'Narrative' as the first dimension of Social Leadership. When we share stories, we contextualise information, relating...
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The Social Leadership Handbook has landed!

The Social Leadership Handbook has landed! | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it
Our UK office is on the third floor, a choice i regret when carrying a thousand books up the back stairs. Today, the Social Leadership Handbook has arrived from the printers in Latvia. Latvia? Yes,...
Victor Jimenez's insight:

If you have not been following Julian Stodd's blog on Social Learning (http://julianstodd.wordpress.com/) you may want to bookmark it now or pick up a copy of the Social Leadership Handbook. I started following his blog close to a year ago now and am glad I found it. Mr. Stodd provides plenty of musings and thought provoking content useful to dig deeper into how social tools can be beneficially used in the workplace or in life in general.

 

Congrats Mr. Stodd and to the team at Sea Salt Learning (http://seasaltlearning.com/)! I'll be looking to order a copy soon!

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The Network Organization 

The Network Organization  | Knowledge Nuggets | Scoop.it

Excerpt from Alma Dakaj's new book, The Company Body. 

 

Successful business organizations of the future will rely more and more on collaborative circles of functions based on skills, expertise and communication, not competitive hierarchies of the people forming the circles.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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How do organizations resemble the human body? Understand one by discussing how the other works?

 

I checked out the slideshares for The Company Body and became intrigued enough to buy the book. Now, time to get reading!

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, February 23, 2014 8:14 AM

I suggest that you also take a look at two of Alma's Slideshare Presentations here: 


  1. The Company Body Part I
  2. The Company Body - Part II