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10 Most Brilliant Social Psychology Experiments

10 Most Brilliant Social Psychology Experiments | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Ten of the most influential social psychology experiments. Each one tells a unique, insightful story relevant to all our lives, every day. 

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Legendary Harvard Psychologist Jerome Bruner on the Art of “Effective Surprise” and the 6 Essential Conditions of Creativity

Legendary Harvard Psychologist Jerome Bruner on the Art of “Effective Surprise” and the 6 Essential Conditions of Creativity | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

One of the greatest preoccupations not only of our culture but of our civilization is the question of what creativity is, dating back to the dawn of recorded thought. But it wasn’t until the advent of modern psychology in the early twentieth century that our answers to the question began to take the shape of something more structured and systematic than metaphysical hunches.


One of the most compelling in the past century comes from the influential Harvard psychologist Jerome Bruner, celebrated for his contributions to cognitive psychology and learning theory in education. In 1962, Bruner published On Knowing: Essays for the Left Hand  - a wonderfully dimensional exploration of “the act of knowing in itself and how it is shaped and in turn gives form to language, science, literature, and art.


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Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension

Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Dust off those Bic ballpoints and college-ruled notebooks — research shows that taking notes by hand is better than taking notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over the long term. The findings are published in Psychological Science.


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15 Signs You Are a Narcissist

15 Signs You Are a Narcissist | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Do you always have to be in control? Do you hate having emotions? Take a look in the mirror, you might be one.


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How to Be Entertaining: 10 Simple Instructions from 1904

How to Be Entertaining: 10 Simple Instructions from 1904 | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Being the life of the party was hard in the early 20th century. Here are 10 tips directly from 1904 to help the uninteresting.


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Superstars of Psychology: 10 Best Short Talks

Superstars of Psychology: 10 Best Short Talks | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Here are 10 of the best talks about psychology from some of the superstars of psychology. 

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How the Mind Works: 10 Fascinating TED Talks

How the Mind Works: 10 Fascinating TED Talks | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

How memory works, what visual illusions reveal, the price of happiness, the power of introverts and more…..

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

A wonderful collection of mind candy. 

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What Makes the Best Infographics So Convincing

What Makes the Best Infographics So Convincing | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Infographics have an emotional power because they can show you an idea — or a relationship, or how something works — very quickly. People respond to that. A persuasive infographic surprises the viewer. It moves them in some way and makes them want to keep looking at it or show it to other people.


A great infographic is an instant revelation. It can compress time and space. It can illuminate patterns in massive amounts of data. It can make the abstract convincingly concrete. 




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The Origins of Office Speak

The Origins of Office Speak | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Over time, different industries have developed their own tribal vocabularies. Some of today’s most popular buzzwords were created by academics who believed that work should satisfy one’s soul; others were coined by consultants who sold the idea that happy workers are effective workers. The Wall Street lingo of the 1980s all comes back to “the bottom line,” while the techie terms of today suggest that humans are creative computers, whose work is measured in “capacity” and “bandwidth.”


Corporate jargon may seem meaningless to the extent that it's best described as “bullshit,”  but it actually reveals a lot about how workers think about their lives.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Fantastic story in The Atlantic!! A must read….

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 24, 2014 11:52 PM

This is prevalent in education as ways to keep outsiders out and to socialize teachers into a particular order. It is "bullshit" for the most part.

David Hain's curator insight, April 25, 2014 4:30 AM

Very perceptive article.

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The Difference Between What You "Should" Do And What You "Must" Do

The Difference Between What You "Should" Do And What You "Must" Do | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

This is a story about two roads: Should and Must.


It’s a pep talk for anyone who’s chosen Should far too long - months, years, maybe a lifetime, and feels like it’s about time they give Must a shot.


There are two paths in life: Should and Must. We arrive at this crossroads over and over again. And each time, we get to choose.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

If you aren't doing what you love, it's time to examine your ideas about calling, career, and how to chase both toward success.

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50 Tweetable Twitter Tips You Wish You Knew Years Ago

50 Tweetable Twitter Tips You Wish You Knew Years Ago | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Want to get more followers and increase engagement on Twitter? Or ... just want to make sure people don't think you're a space case on Twitter?


Either way, here's a massive list of 50 Twitter tips that will make you a more effective Twitter user, and that you wish you knew years ago. 


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Pascal Corbé's curator insight, April 23, 2014 12:58 PM

Important basics on properly utilizing twitter - a medium we won't get around anymore.

Besides all the well-founded criticism, that is twitter creating a lot of noise, one has to remember not confuse the medium with the content. Content will always be king - and remains the basis for any thorough messaging.

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Forget mindfulness. Try nevermindfulness

It is time for a reboot! Forget mindfulness. Try nevermindfulness.


Watch this excellent TEDx Talk by Bruce Turkel. 

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How the internet is using us all

How the internet is using us all | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

If the origins of Western civilization are linked to ancient Greece, the future of human existence is pegged to Silicon Valley.


The “Valley” is not merely a byword for technological innovation and economic growth: it is the lush seedbed for a new ideology of the twenty-first century, one that fills the void left by the Cold War. This ideology revolves around the internet. Its fundamentalist narrative has been spun over several decades from such diverse strands as free-market economics, techno-mysticism, anarchist leanings and utopian longings, and has now assumed a prominent place in everyday conversation alongside the technologies that inspired it.


The internet ideology provides a quasi-religious vision of how human relationships will be transformed, material abundance created, and transcendence attained through human - machine interactions. Its prophets cite its decentralized and open structure as the model for a free, egalitarian and transparent world order.


Image credit: O’Rear/Corbis.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Excellent article from The Times Literary Supplement. 

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What Happened to All the Laughter?

What Happened to All the Laughter? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

A kid laughs on average 300 times a day. An adult laughs on average….five times a day. What the…!?


How did we go from 300 to 5? What the hell happened to us? That’s why we start to panic during the day!


Did we cross some bridge of crap and tears and now here we are: drones that wake up, go to work, backstab each other in office politics, watch Breaking Bad, and then go to sleep and Die? Every single day?


Did someone slip a pill into the Starbucks coffee we drink every day? A no-laughing pill?


Laughter is really hard as an adult. It has to be. Else, how did we go from 300 to 5! That’s a HUGE gap. There is no arguing that something really bad and scary and sad happened to us between childhood and adulthood.


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The Quick and Dirty on Data Visualization

The Quick and Dirty on Data Visualization | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Displaying data can be a tricky proposition, because different rules apply in different contexts. A sales director presenting financial projections to a group of field reps wouldn’t visualize her data the same way that a design consultant would in a written proposal to a potential client.


So how do you make the right choices for your situation? Before displaying your data, ask yourself these five questions: 


1. Am I presenting or circulating my data?

2. Am I using the right kind of chart or table?

3. What message am I trying to convey?

4. Do my visuals accurately reflect the numbers?

5. Are my data memorable?


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Excellent blog post by Nancy Duarte on Harvard Business Review. 


Nancy Duarte is the author of two award-winning books on the art of presenting, Slide:ology and Resonate.


Read my previous Scoop about Resonate here - and follow the link to read the book online. But I encourage you to buy the hardcopy - it's a treat.  


You can follow Nancy on Twitter here: @nancyduarte.


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Find Your Passion With These 8 Thought-Provoking Questions

Find Your Passion With These 8 Thought-Provoking Questions | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Warren Berger, author of A More Beautiful Question, collected the provocative questions top designers, tech innovators, and entrepreneurs ask themselves to spark creativity. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Questions to consider: 


  1. What do I find myself doing?
  2. What am I doing when I feel most beautiful?
  3. What is something you believe that almost nobody agrees with you on?
  4. What are your superpowers?
  5. What did you enjoy doing at age 10?
  6. What are you willing to try now?
  7. Looking back on your career, 20 or 30 years from now, what do you want to say you’ve accomplished?
  8. What is your sentence?



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Karen Bowden's curator insight, April 17, 2014 10:16 AM

What am I doing when I feel the most beautiful/handsome?

Where do I feel the most alive?

What is something you believe that almost nobody agrees with you on?

What are your superpowers?

What are you willing to try now?

In 20-30 years from now, what do you want to say you've accomplished?

What is your sentence?

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8 Ways Not to Manage Your Email (and 5 and a Half Tactics that Work)

8 Ways Not to Manage Your Email (and 5 and a Half Tactics that Work) | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

In 1635, England’s Charles I expanded the island’s mail delivery service to the public — with postage paid by the recipient and based on the weight of the letter. If Great Aunt Henrietta wrote you a 10-page letter asking why you weren’t married yet, throughout most of the country you paid for the privilege of receiving it. It wasn’t until 1840 that the Royal Mail switched to a system in which postage was prepaid by the sender.


I think of this fact often when checking my email. I hope it doesn’t take 200 years to figure out how to make the initiators of these messages — rather than their beleaguered recipients — bear the burden of their sending. But until then, recipients have to manage. And often, we have to manage without the kind of administrative support 20th century executives relied on.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Sarah Green, a senior associate editor at Harvard Business Review shares her results from a two-year experiment in self-management.


You can follow Sarah on Twitter at @skgreen.

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The Remarkable Power Of Visual Metaphors To Make Us More Creative

Figurative images, such as an illuminated or a blown bulb, can improve our insights--but they can also dim them.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

New research, published this month in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggests that visual metaphors don't have to be so intrusive to be effective. In one experiment, test participants completed a creativity measure online. During the task, some saw a page banner depicting a brain hovering above a box, while others saw a neutral image (a fish) or none at all. The first group of participants indeed showed better insights than the others; they thought, as it were, outside the box.

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Why Failing Well Is the Key to Success

Why Failing Well Is the Key to Success | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Failure is how we learn. The problem is, argues Megan McArdle, we’re forgetting that truth. We are becoming too risk-averse and that is bad for our children, for our personal lives, for our companies, and for our country.


While we tend to treat success as finite and failure as disaster, the reality is that in order to be successful, we must learn how to harness the power of failure. In The Up Side Down, McArdle explains why.


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What Would Plato Have Thought of Crowdsourcing?

What Would Plato Have Thought of Crowdsourcing? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

All the questions about the meaning of life, Plato found, belonged to the same area of knowledge, which we now call philosophy. Plato made the quest for understanding life one unified whole. So he would have loved the worldwide web, and would have likely been a proponent of Internet neutrality and keeping the web “whole.” Plato, the father of philosophy, would have indeed loved the Internet, maybe a little too much.


A new book, Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away, by novelist Rebecca Goldstein, lets us actually follow Plato around in modern life as he discovers the latest fruits of the Internet revolution.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

I suggest you also read the book review of 'Plato at the Googleplex' from The Boston Globe. 


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Exploring the Genetics of “I’ll Do It Tomorrow”

Exploring the Genetics of “I’ll Do It Tomorrow” | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Procrastination and impulsivity are genetically linked, suggesting that the two traits stem from similar evolutionary origins, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research indicates that the traits are related to our ability to successfully pursue and juggle goals.


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7 Habits of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People

7 Habits of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

People with high emotional intelligence tend to do better at work. So what habits do they have that set them apart?


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invisibleinc's curator insight, April 15, 2014 9:47 AM

I just attended a communication workshop that revealed.......I'm and emotional idiot...to put in nicely.  Nice to know what I didn't know.

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The Moral Power of Curiosity

The Moral Power of Curiosity | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Most of us have at one time or another felt ourselves in the grip of the explanatory drive. You’re confronted by some puzzle, confusion or mystery. Your inability to come up with an answer gnaws at you. You’re up at night, turning the problem over in your mind. Then, suddenly: clarity. The pieces click into place. There’s a jolt of pure satisfaction.


We’re all familiar with this drive, but I wasn’t really conscious of the moral force of this longing until I read Michael Lewis’s book, “Flash Boys.”


As you’re probably aware, this book is about how a small number of Wall Street-types figured out that the stock markets were rigged by high-frequency traders who used complex technologies to give themselves a head start on everybody else. It’s nominally a book about finance, but it’s really a morality tale. The core question Lewis forces us to ask is: Why did some people do the right thing while most of their peers did not?


The answer, is that most people on Wall Street are primarily motivated to make money, but a few people are primarily motivated by an intense desire to figure stuff out.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Very interesting op-ed column in New York Times by David Brooks linking curiosity and the behavior on Wall St.


The column relates to Michael Lewis' recent book, Flash Boy.


I suggest you also read the counter argument from Todd Essig on Forbes: The Morality Of Curiosity And The Immorality Of Certainty.


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Tony Vengrove's curator insight, April 13, 2014 3:35 PM

Funny, I just wrote a piece about curiosity a couple of days ago and along comes this interesting article.  Love this line:  "...but a few people are primarily motivated by an intense desire to figure stuff out."  Yes!

Connie Hamilton Ed.S.'s curator insight, April 13, 2014 4:37 PM
Just watch a kindergartener.
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Why Empathy is Essential to a Culture of Health

Why Empathy is Essential to a Culture of Health | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Empathy is the lifeblood of any system of health - it gives us all a shared stake in being healthy and helping others to thrive as well.

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The Art of the Done List: Harnessing the Power of Progress

The Art of the Done List: Harnessing the Power of Progress | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

From carpenters to sculptors, makers end each workday with a physical object looking different than it did that morning. But what if you’re a knowledge worker? How do we know our level of progress when the fruits of our labors can be easily and quickly buried by our next task? 



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Curated by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Thinker ★ Speaker ★ Writer ★ Leadership Adviser ★ Learning Designer ★ Neo-Generalist

Kenneth Mikkelsen is co-founder of FutureShifts. He helps visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, behaviours and organisational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.