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IdeasLabs 2012 - Sandy Pentland - Sustainable Digital Ecology

Alex (Sandy) Pentland, MIT, gives a key insight into the concept of Sustainable Digital Ecology. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Great talk by Sandy Pentland. I highly recommend that you watch this video. Food for thoughts. 

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Knowledge Broker
Valuable insights for inquisitive minds. Stuff that makes you go….hmmm, interesting.
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About Knowledge Broker

About Knowledge Broker | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

In my professional life I serve as a knowledge broker to many people. 


A knowledge broker is a person who connects people and ideas by seeking information from a variety of industries, disciplines, and contexts.


The purpose of this site - Knowledge Broker - is to highlight and share novel and creative thinking that makes you go: Hmm….interesting


My personal aim is to provide you with stories you can learn and grow from. The kind of stories that provokes personal reflection and constructive action. 


You're welcome to connect via: 

 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kennethmikkelsen


Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KennethMikkelsen


Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeadershipABC

 

Enjoy!

 

Kenneth


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Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, January 3, 12:29 PM

are you a  knowledge broker?

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The Quick and Dirty on Data Visualization

The Quick and Dirty on Data Visualization | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Displaying data can be a tricky proposition, because different rules apply in different contexts. A sales director presenting financial projections to a group of field reps wouldn’t visualize her data the same way that a design consultant would in a written proposal to a potential client.


So how do you make the right choices for your situation? Before displaying your data, ask yourself these five questions: 


1. Am I presenting or circulating my data?

2. Am I using the right kind of chart or table?

3. What message am I trying to convey?

4. Do my visuals accurately reflect the numbers?

5. Are my data memorable?


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Excellent blog post by Nancy Duarte on Harvard Business Review. 


Nancy Duarte is the author of two award-winning books on the art of presenting, Slide:ology and Resonate.


Read my previous Scoop about Resonate here - and follow the link to read the book online. But I encourage you to buy the hardcopy - it's a treat.  


You can follow Nancy on Twitter here: @nancyduarte.


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8 Ways Not to Manage Your Email (and 5 and a Half Tactics that Work)

8 Ways Not to Manage Your Email (and 5 and a Half Tactics that Work) | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

In 1635, England’s Charles I expanded the island’s mail delivery service to the public — with postage paid by the recipient and based on the weight of the letter. If Great Aunt Henrietta wrote you a 10-page letter asking why you weren’t married yet, throughout most of the country you paid for the privilege of receiving it. It wasn’t until 1840 that the Royal Mail switched to a system in which postage was prepaid by the sender.


I think of this fact often when checking my email. I hope it doesn’t take 200 years to figure out how to make the initiators of these messages — rather than their beleaguered recipients — bear the burden of their sending. But until then, recipients have to manage. And often, we have to manage without the kind of administrative support 20th century executives relied on.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Sarah Green, a senior associate editor at Harvard Business Review shares her results from a two-year experiment in self-management.


You can follow Sarah on Twitter at @skgreen.

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Why Failing Well Is the Key to Success

Why Failing Well Is the Key to Success | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Failure is how we learn. The problem is, argues Megan McArdle, we’re forgetting that truth. We are becoming too risk-averse and that is bad for our children, for our personal lives, for our companies, and for our country.


While we tend to treat success as finite and failure as disaster, the reality is that in order to be successful, we must learn how to harness the power of failure. In The Up Side Down, McArdle explains why.


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Exploring the Genetics of “I’ll Do It Tomorrow”

Exploring the Genetics of “I’ll Do It Tomorrow” | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Procrastination and impulsivity are genetically linked, suggesting that the two traits stem from similar evolutionary origins, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The research indicates that the traits are related to our ability to successfully pursue and juggle goals.


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The Moral Power of Curiosity

The Moral Power of Curiosity | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Most of us have at one time or another felt ourselves in the grip of the explanatory drive. You’re confronted by some puzzle, confusion or mystery. Your inability to come up with an answer gnaws at you. You’re up at night, turning the problem over in your mind. Then, suddenly: clarity. The pieces click into place. There’s a jolt of pure satisfaction.


We’re all familiar with this drive, but I wasn’t really conscious of the moral force of this longing until I read Michael Lewis’s book, “Flash Boys.”


As you’re probably aware, this book is about how a small number of Wall Street-types figured out that the stock markets were rigged by high-frequency traders who used complex technologies to give themselves a head start on everybody else. It’s nominally a book about finance, but it’s really a morality tale. The core question Lewis forces us to ask is: Why did some people do the right thing while most of their peers did not?


The answer, is that most people on Wall Street are primarily motivated to make money, but a few people are primarily motivated by an intense desire to figure stuff out.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Very interesting op-ed column in New York Times by David Brooks linking curiosity and the behavior on Wall St.


The column relates to Michael Lewis' recent book, Flash Boy.


I suggest you also read the counter argument from Todd Essig on Forbes: The Morality Of Curiosity And The Immorality Of Certainty.


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Tony Vengrove's curator insight, April 13, 12:35 PM

Funny, I just wrote a piece about curiosity a couple of days ago and along comes this interesting article.  Love this line:  "...but a few people are primarily motivated by an intense desire to figure stuff out."  Yes!

Connie Hamilton Ed.S.'s curator insight, April 13, 1:37 PM
Just watch a kindergartener.
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The Art of the Done List: Harnessing the Power of Progress

The Art of the Done List: Harnessing the Power of Progress | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

From carpenters to sculptors, makers end each workday with a physical object looking different than it did that morning. But what if you’re a knowledge worker? How do we know our level of progress when the fruits of our labors can be easily and quickly buried by our next task? 



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The Science of How Memory Works

The Science of How Memory Works | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

In The Guardian of All Things: The Epic Story of Human Memory technology writer Michael S. Malone takes a 10,000-year journey into humanity’s understanding of our great cognitive record-keeper, exploring both its power and its ongoing perplexity.


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The Stoic: 9 Principles to Help You Keep Calm in Chaos

The Stoic: 9 Principles to Help You Keep Calm in Chaos | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Observing individuals who lead a creative life, we can identify elements of expertise, grit, an understanding, and passion. What’s easy to overlook is the inner system within an individual—the set of principles that govern their mind and behavior. When failure ensues or the need to adapt is necessary, how does one respond? What do they tell themselves? In other words, what’s their philosophy?


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6 Changes That Will Make You More Imaginative

6 Changes That Will Make You More Imaginative | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Originality is fundamental to innovation and the key to building sustainable businesses and brands. However, in order to innovate, we must move from the known to the unknown - we must dream.


Sadly, the metaskill of dreaming is not taught in business schools - or any other school for that matter. There is no “Dreaming 101” class. This is disheartening, especially in an age when innovation is often the dividing line between success and failure.


The good news is, dreaming can be harnessed for a specific purpose using applied imagination. Once we learn the skill of dreaming--of disassociating our thoughts from the linear and the logical--we can become wellsprings of originality.


While some people may be naturals in the realm of imagination, we can all improve our skills with deliberate practice.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This article by Marty Neumeier - author of the wonderful book Metaskills: Five Talents for the Robotic Age - highlights six strategies for applied imagination that can help to trigger new ideas.


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Why Aren't We More Compassionate?

Why Aren't We More Compassionate? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

In this TED Talk Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence, asks why we aren't more compassionate more of the time.

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Brainswarming: Because Brainstorming Doesn't Work

Brainswarming: Because Brainstorming Doesn't Work | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Something to watch before your next brainstorming session. 


Dr. Tony McCaffrey outlines a new way to generate ideas: Brainswarming. 


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Sophie Touzé's curator insight, March 31, 2:35 AM

1. Map is my favourite and more effective tool

2. Biomimetism is powerfull

so I Love Brainswarming

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Taking a Closer Look at Health Benefits of Meditation

Taking a Closer Look at Health Benefits of Meditation | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Meditation research has come a long way since the first scientific study on meditation was published in a peer-reviewed journal in 1971 . 


Now there are over 1,000 published studies on various meditation practices, with over 600 studies on the Transcendental Meditation technique alone.

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malek's curator insight, April 1, 11:29 AM

Meditation fills a need that women crave: to carve out time for themselves "to rest, to restore, to settle in

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What Happened to All the Laughter?

What Happened to All the Laughter? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

A kid laughs on average 300 times a day. An adult laughs on average….five times a day. What the…!?


How did we go from 300 to 5? What the hell happened to us? That’s why we start to panic during the day!


Did we cross some bridge of crap and tears and now here we are: drones that wake up, go to work, backstab each other in office politics, watch Breaking Bad, and then go to sleep and Die? Every single day?


Did someone slip a pill into the Starbucks coffee we drink every day? A no-laughing pill?


Laughter is really hard as an adult. It has to be. Else, how did we go from 300 to 5! That’s a HUGE gap. There is no arguing that something really bad and scary and sad happened to us between childhood and adulthood.


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Find Your Passion With These 8 Thought-Provoking Questions

Find Your Passion With These 8 Thought-Provoking Questions | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Warren Berger, author of A More Beautiful Question, collected the provocative questions top designers, tech innovators, and entrepreneurs ask themselves to spark creativity. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Questions to consider: 


  1. What do I find myself doing?
  2. What am I doing when I feel most beautiful?
  3. What is something you believe that almost nobody agrees with you on?
  4. What are your superpowers?
  5. What did you enjoy doing at age 10?
  6. What are you willing to try now?
  7. Looking back on your career, 20 or 30 years from now, what do you want to say you’ve accomplished?
  8. What is your sentence?



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Karen Bowden's curator insight, April 17, 7:16 AM

What am I doing when I feel the most beautiful/handsome?

Where do I feel the most alive?

What is something you believe that almost nobody agrees with you on?

What are your superpowers?

What are you willing to try now?

In 20-30 years from now, what do you want to say you've accomplished?

What is your sentence?

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The Remarkable Power Of Visual Metaphors To Make Us More Creative

Figurative images, such as an illuminated or a blown bulb, can improve our insights--but they can also dim them.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

New research, published this month in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, suggests that visual metaphors don't have to be so intrusive to be effective. In one experiment, test participants completed a creativity measure online. During the task, some saw a page banner depicting a brain hovering above a box, while others saw a neutral image (a fish) or none at all. The first group of participants indeed showed better insights than the others; they thought, as it were, outside the box.

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What Would Plato Have Thought of Crowdsourcing?

What Would Plato Have Thought of Crowdsourcing? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

All the questions about the meaning of life, Plato found, belonged to the same area of knowledge, which we now call philosophy. Plato made the quest for understanding life one unified whole. So he would have loved the worldwide web, and would have likely been a proponent of Internet neutrality and keeping the web “whole.” Plato, the father of philosophy, would have indeed loved the Internet, maybe a little too much.


A new book, Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away, by novelist Rebecca Goldstein, lets us actually follow Plato around in modern life as he discovers the latest fruits of the Internet revolution.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

I suggest you also read the book review of 'Plato at the Googleplex' from The Boston Globe. 


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7 Habits of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People

7 Habits of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

People with high emotional intelligence tend to do better at work. So what habits do they have that set them apart?


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invisibleinc's curator insight, April 15, 6:47 AM

I just attended a communication workshop that revealed.......I'm and emotional idiot...to put in nicely.  Nice to know what I didn't know.

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Why Empathy is Essential to a Culture of Health

Why Empathy is Essential to a Culture of Health | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Empathy is the lifeblood of any system of health - it gives us all a shared stake in being healthy and helping others to thrive as well.

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In Defense Of A Liberal Arts Degree

In Defense Of A Liberal Arts Degree | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

People with degrees in subjects such as history and literature - and, yes, even philosophy - tend to possess many of the qualities, skill sets, and aptitudes that are in highest demand in my industries that rely on creative thinking and foresight. 

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Malcolm Gladwell Talks at Google: David and Goliath

Malcolm Gladwell, discusses his latest book: "David and Goliath" at Google. 


In David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell challenges how we think about obstacles and disadvantages, offering a new interpretation of what it means to be discriminated against, or cope with a disability, or lose a parent, or attend a mediocre school, or suffer from any number of other apparent setbacks.

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10 Online Tools for Better Attention & Focus

10 Online Tools for Better Attention & Focus | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Finding focus is rapidly becoming the biggest workplace challenge. We highlight a handful of apps to help cure internet addictions and better manage your time.

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The Psychology of Messiness: How Disorder Can Make You More Creative

The Psychology of Messiness: How Disorder Can Make You More Creative | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Kathleen Vohs, a marketing professor at the University of Minnesota with an extensive psychology background, believes that messier office spaces spur creativity. Here's the evidence.


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The Science of Character

While virtues have been around since Aristotle, two seminal psychologists from the University of Pennsylvania, Martin Seligman and the late Chris Peterson, undertook research to identify the universal traits that are best about human beings. They combed through nearly 2,500 years of history to identify six core “virtues” found across religions, cultures, nations, and belief systems.

The virtues that made the cut were wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance, and transcendence. Each virtue contains three to five character strengths, with a total of 24 topping the list. You, just like every other person you work with, have five “signature” strengths - like a unique strain of DNA - that make up the “real you.”


If you're interested in learning more about it, check out award-winning director Tiffany Shlain's 8 minute film, The Science of Character.


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 31, 5:05 PM

These are great and timeless virtues. They are education.

David Hain's curator insight, April 1, 12:00 AM

You can buy a set of strength cards based on these qualities - great for positive coaching!

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Indecision Is Sometimes The Best Way To Decide

Indecision Is Sometimes The Best Way To Decide | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Acting on gut feelings without agonising over alternative courses of action has been given scientific credibility by popular books such as Malcolm Gladwell’s Blink, in which the author tries to convince us of ‘a simple fact: decisions made very quickly can be every bit as good as decisions made cautiously and deliberately’.


But what if the allure of decisiveness were leading us astray? What if flip-flopping were adaptive and useful in certain scenarios, shepherding us away from decisions that the devotees of Blink might end up regretting?


Might a little indecision actually be a useful thing?




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How Successful Networks Nurture Good Ideas

How Successful Networks Nurture Good Ideas | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

We write the equivalent of 520 million books every day on social media and email. The fact that so many of us are writing — sharing our ideas, good and bad — has changed the way we think. Just as we now live in public, so do we think in public.



Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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John Michel's curator insight, March 30, 5:43 AM

Studies have found that the effort of communicating to someone else forces you to pay more attention and learn more.

niftyjock's curator insight, April 1, 2:31 PM

I think in Private but I make mistakes in public