Knowledge Broker
Follow
Find
32.1K views | +3 today
 
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
onto Knowledge Broker
Scoop.it!

The New Digital Age: The Internet Doesn’t Hurt People - People Do

The New Digital Age: The Internet Doesn’t Hurt People - People Do | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it
The Internet’s disruptive impact has only just begun. Mass adoption of the Internet is driving one of the most exciting social, cultural, and political transformations in history, and unlike earlier periods of change, this time the effects are fully global.
more...
No comment yet.
Knowledge Broker
Valuable insights for inquisitive minds. Stuff that makes you go….hmmm, interesting.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

About Knowledge Broker

About Knowledge Broker | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

The purpose of this site - Knowledge Broker - is to highlight and share novel and creative thinking that makes you go: Hmm….interesting


Here I share interesting new books, thought-provoking videos, the latest research into neuroscience, psychology and human behavior, alternative ways of thinking, new innovative ideas, and motivational speeches.


                                                 ★★★★★ 


About Kenneth Mikkelsen


I believe that knowledge is everything. Knowledge is ideas. Knowledge is power. Knowledge is hope. 

But only if it is shared and applied.


That is why I created Knowledge Broker on Scoop.it. My personal aim is to provide you with stories you can learn and grow from. The kind of stories that provokes personal reflection and constructive action. 

I'm co-founder of FutureShifts, a consultancy that helps visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, behaviors and organizational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.


You're welcome to connect via: 

 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kennethmikkelsen

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KennethMikkelsen

Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeadershipABC

 

I hope you'll be inspired.

 

Enjoy!

 

Kenneth

more...
Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, January 3, 2014 3:29 PM

are you a  knowledge broker?

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Little Lifehacks Guaranteed to Improve your Life

Little Lifehacks Guaranteed to Improve your Life | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Lifehacks can be as helpful as making your day better to helping you sell your company.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

A fine list by Greg Isenberg. I like this one: 


  • Make a list of 10 people who you often forget to keep in touch with but care about. These are people who would go up to bat for you no matter what. Could be high school friends, your grandmother or an old co-worker. Put them on your phones favorites list. Call them when you’re walking to places. Try not to uber or drive places that are less than 15 minutes walking distance and use that time to call them. Your quality of life will increase.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Books worth reading, as recommended by Bill Gates, Susan Cain and more...

Books worth reading, as recommended by Bill Gates, Susan Cain and more... | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

52 of the world's leading thinkers offer the books that inspired them and their work.


more...
Agnes Ng's curator insight, May 4, 7:34 AM

NYP library users can check out the availability of the books from the Library Catalogue. E.g. Read the book "Creative Confidence" by Tom Kelley and David Kelley from NYP Library's IE Collection, Call number: HD53 K29

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Digital Natives, Yet Strangers to the Web

Digital Natives, Yet Strangers to the Web | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Today's schools are focusing on boosting kids’ technological proficiency and warning them about the perils of the web. But something critical is missing from this education.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Kids are learning a distorted view of the digital world that reflects the fears of adults rather than the aspirations of youth.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Why Study Philosophy? 'To Challenge Your Own Point of View'

Why Study Philosophy? 'To Challenge Your Own Point of View' | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

At a time when advances in science and technology have changed our understanding of our mental and physical selves, it is easy for some to dismiss the discipline of philosophy as obsolete.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

An interview with Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, author of Plato at the Googleplex.


more...
Dr. J.L. Harter's curator insight, April 25, 10:37 PM

Challenging your own point of view...getting at those beliefs we hold that hold us back or cloud our truth...I love Philosophy!

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 25, 11:11 PM

I have enjoyed gaining a PhD in philosophy. It broadens my way of interacting with the world and people.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Paris versus New York

A beautiful animated version of Vahram Muratyan’s book "Paris versus New York”.  



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This video showcase the work of graphic designer Vahram Muratyan.
It builds on his book Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities, that explores the peculiarities and contradictions of Paris and New York through “a friendly visual match” of minimalist illustrated parallel portraits.


I also recommend that you read this story about Muratyan's work from Brain Pickings: Paris vs. New York: Minimalist Illustrated Parallels of Culture




more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Reclaiming the Age-Old Art of Getting Lost

Reclaiming the Age-Old Art of Getting Lost | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Ditching modern-day navigation apps in favor of wandering and discovery.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:
Turn off your iPhone.
Fold up the paper map if you still use one.
You should get lost.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

The Moral Bucket List: Should you live for your résumé...or your eulogy?

The Moral Bucket List: Should you live for your résumé...or your eulogy? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Within each of us are two selves, suggests David Brooks in this meditative short talk: the self who craves success, who builds a résumé, and the self who seeks connection, community, love -- the values that make for a great eulogy. (Joseph Soloveitchik has called these selves "Adam I" and "Adam II.") Brooks asks: Can we balance these two selves?

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Read also this op-ed column by David Brooks from The New York Times: The Moral Bucket List


Excerpt from the column: 


We live in the culture of the Big Me. The meritocracy wants you to promote yourself. Social media wants you to broadcast a highlight reel of your life. Your parents and teachers were always telling you how wonderful you were.


But all the people I’ve ever deeply admired are profoundly honest about their own weaknesses. They have identified their core sin, whether it is selfishness, the desperate need for approval, cowardice, hardheartedness or whatever. They have traced how that core sin leads to the behavior that makes them feel ashamed. They have achieved a profound humility, which has best been defined as an intense self-awareness from a position of other-centeredness.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

The Psychology of Trust in Work and Love

The Psychology of Trust in Work and Love | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

In "The Truth About Trust: How It Determines Success in Life, Love, Learning, and More," David DeSteno argues that matters of trust occupy an enormous amount of our mental energies and influence, directly or indirectly, practically every aspect of our everyday lives. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The psychology of trust in work and love – fascinating research on the hidden dynamics of human interaction.


more...
Dr. J.L. Harter's curator insight, April 9, 9:04 AM

Trust is often a challenge for many.  This is an interesting perspective. ~Jaie

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Knowledge Workers Need an Industrial Revolution

Knowledge Workers Need an Industrial Revolution | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Information workers waste an inordinate amount of time orchestrating work rather than doing work. Instead of creating new content to drive our businesses, organizations, and missions forward, we spend our time looking for information and people, and then connecting and coordinating them to ensure that good decisions are made, or that other people can do their jobs. It is all terribly inefficient.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Information work needs its industrial revolution.


We spend an average of 1.5 hours per day in meetings and just under an hour per day scheduling meetings. According to McKinsey & Company, we spend two hours sending and responding to email. Add these tasks up and they take a total of 6.5 hours per day. If we are generous and count half the time spent in meetings as productive content creation rather than alignment, it still means that 50 to 60 percent of an information worker’s day is spent orchestrating work.


more...
Stephen Dale's curator insight, March 30, 4:37 AM

Content creation is a free-ranging activity that is defined not by tools, but by the ability to connect information in different forms. Yet today we are forced to work within the confines of software capabilities, and that constraint shapes the way we approach content creation. 


Reading time: 5 mins

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Consciousness Is the Whole Brain. It's Not Reducible

Consciousness Is the Whole Brain. It's Not Reducible | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Consciousness is an emergent property of the brain, resulting from the communication of information across all its regions and cannot be reduced to something residing in specific areas.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Why face-to-face contact matters in our digital age

Why face-to-face contact matters in our digital age | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

In villages in Sardinia, 10 times as many men live past 100 than the average. Why? A key reason is that they are not lonely. Psychologist Susan Pinker on the importance of face-to-face contact in our era of disbanded families and virtual connections.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

There is one place in Europe where both sexes are living long lives. It is an area where, for better or worse, no one is left alone for very long. In what has been dubbed the Age of Loneliness, it’s worth asking what they have that we don’t.


more...
Chris Shern's curator insight, March 22, 3:52 AM

"In a time where technology and technocrats dominate conversation, the rediscovery of the essence of being human is more important than ever."

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute

A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Now that we have hard data on everything, we no longer make decisions from our hearts, guts or principles.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Not long ago, our blockbuster business books spoke in unison: Trust your gut. The secret to decision-making lay outside our intellects, across the aisle in our loopy right brains, with their emo melodramas and surges of intuition. Linear thinking was suddenly the royal road to ruin. Dan Ariely’s “Predictably Irrational” tracked the extravagant illogic of our best judgment calls. The “Freakonomics” authors urged us to think like nut jobs. In “Blink,” Malcolm Gladwell counseled abandoning scientific method in favor of snap judgments. Tedious hours of research, conducted by artless cubicle drones, became the province of companies courting Chapter 11. To the artsy dropouts who could barely grasp a polynomial would go the spoils of the serial bull markets.



No more. The gut is dead. Long live the data, turned out day and night by our myriad computers and smart devices. Not that we trust the data, as we once trusted our guts. Instead, we “optimize” it. We optimize for it. We optimize with it.

more...
Stephen Dale's curator insight, March 19, 7:56 AM

Data optimisation - the antidote to common sense?

 

Reading time: 8mins

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Use Stress to Your Advantage

Use Stress to Your Advantage | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

To perform under pressure, research finds that welcoming anxiety is more helpful than calming down.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

“We’re bombarded with information about how bad stress is,” says Jeremy Jamieson, a professor of psychology at the University of Rochester who specializes in stress. But the conventional view, he says, fails to appreciate the many ways in which physical and psychological tension can help us to perform better.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

The Crossroads of Should and Must

The Crossroads of Should and Must | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

How to turn your invisible inner fire into fuel for soul-warming bliss is what artist and designer Elle Luna explores in her essay-turned-book The Crossroads of Should and Must: Find and Follow Your Passion.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Should is how other people want us to live our lives... Choosing Must is the greatest thing we can do with our lives.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Unlocking the transformative potential of storytelling

Unlocking the transformative potential of storytelling | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

When people connect to political issues through personal stories, they see them in a different way. They don’t just see democracy in the abstract, they see ‘my democracy.’ The transformative potential of storytelling is written into the fabric of our lives.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Each community has its own traditions of storytelling, from elders sitting around the fire to the latest story hubs on social media. We hear stories every day, and we tell them every day: to friends, partners, children and grandchildren.  Stories are everywhere. It’s clear that they are used to make meaning and communicate with one another, but how do stories contribute to personal and political transformation, to democracy and social justice?


more...
Kavita Yadav's curator insight, April 27, 1:39 AM

Absolutely agree that story telling is a very powerful transformation tool. You can make the audience open and awake to the idea of thinking and giving them a food for thought. I love storytelling activities :)   

ToKTutor's curator insight, April 27, 3:04 AM

Title 5: The power of stories: they emotionally engage us to change our perspectives about issues in the search for knowledge.

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Mixed Signals: Why People Misunderstand Each Other

Mixed Signals: Why People Misunderstand Each Other | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

The psychological quirks that make it tricky to get an accurate read on someone's emotions.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

People who are easy to judge — people who send clear signals to others are, researchers have found, ultimately happier and more satisfied with their relationships, careers, and lives than those who are more difficult to read. It’s easy to understand why: Feeling understood is a basic human need. When people satisfy that need, they feel more at peace with themselves and with the people around them, who see them closer to how they see themselves.


more...
Dr. J.L. Harter's curator insight, April 25, 10:25 PM

Assumption based on perception can skew reality.  Understanding intention, perception and assumption is key to changing interactions potentially from negative to positive. 

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

The Real Power of Generosity

The Real Power of Generosity | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Generosity is the tissue that connects us to ourselves, to others, and to life itself. And it’s a practice — one that has meaningful benefits to our mental and physical health, as well as our relationships with others.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Being able to step outside of oneself and give is an essential ingredient for happiness.


more...
Louisa ROQUE's curator insight, April 21, 5:39 AM

Generosity can make us happier!

Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, April 21, 6:16 AM

Generosity is more than just “giving up.” Generosity generates its power from the gesture of letting go. Being able to give to others shows us our ability to let go of attachments that otherwise can limit our beliefs and our experiences.

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

The Muddied Meaning of ‘Mindfulness’

The Muddied Meaning of ‘Mindfulness’ | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

If the word seems like a badge for the self-satisfied set, that’s because its true meaning has become obscured.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Do you know the origin of the term "mindfulness"? 


In the late 19th century, the heyday of both the British Empire and Victorian Orientalism, a British magistrate in Galle, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), with the formidable name of Thomas William Rhys Davids, found himself charged with adjudicating Buddhist ecclesiastical disputes. He set out to learn Pali, a Middle Indo-Aryan tongue and the liturgical language of Theravada, an early branch of Buddhism. In 1881, he thus pulled out “mindfulness” — a synonym for “attention” from 1530 — as an approximate translation of the Buddhist concept of sati.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

How Capitalism Created 'Cool'

How Capitalism Created 'Cool' | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Two brain researchers discuss why vintage T-shirts and Beats By Dre headphones make us feel so, well, cool.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Steven Quartz, a philosopher and neuroscientist, along with Anette Asp, a political scientist and neuromarketer, investigate the underlying neurological and cultural processes that play a part in our decisions as consumers in their new book, Cool: How the Brain’s Hidden Quest for Cool Drives Our Economy and Shapes Our World.


In this Atlantic interview Quartz and Asp talk about how the concept of cool influences human beings.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

What did democracy really mean in Athens?

While we might consider elections to be the cornerstone of democracy, the Athenians who coined the term actually employed a lottery system to choose most of their politicians. Melissa Schwartzberg describes the ins and outs of the Athenian democracy, and addresses some ways in which a lottery system might benefit us today.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Are We Really Conscious?

Are We Really Conscious? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Of the three most fundamental scientific questions about the human condition, two have been answered.


First, what is our relationship to the rest of the universe? Copernicus answered that one. We’re not at the center. We’re a speck in a large place.


Second, what is our relationship to the diversity of life? Darwin answered that one. Biologically speaking, we’re not a special act of creation. We’re a twig on the tree of evolution.


Third, what is the relationship between our minds and the physical world? It sure seems like it. But brain science suggests we’re not.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Awareness is not an illusion. It’s a caricature. Something — attention — really does exist, and awareness is a distorted accounting of it.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Corporate Culture and Workplace Happiness at South by Southwest

Corporate Culture and Workplace Happiness at South by Southwest | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Engaged employees are the harbingers of workforce retention and happiness in the workplace, however numerous companies struggle with creating practices and protocols that result in enthusiastic personnel.


From haphazard questionnaires to ambiguous measurements, countless companies are striving to produce solutions that will boost morale and prevent great team members from leaving, but these companies are falling desperately short of their aspirations.


This begs the questions: Can happiness truly be measured? Can employee engagement be quantifiably tracked? Has the traditional employee engagement industry become obsolete?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

The Brain’s Empathy Gap

The Brain’s Empathy Gap | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Governments and nongovernmental organizations have spent decades perfecting the art of collective persuasion — getting people to do things that are good for them and for society. They have persuaded us to eat more vegetables and to wear our seatbelts, to walk for cures and to give to charity. What has not come so easily is persuading us to identify with — or even tolerate — people we perceive as outsiders. This is especially true when those outsiders form an entire community.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Can mapping neural pathways help us make friends with our enemies?


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

The Power of Not Knowing

The Power of Not Knowing | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

When was the last time you said “I don’t know” in a business or organizational context, with the idea that your honesty would actually get you somewhere?







Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Traditional paradigms have taught us that in order to survive, we must position ourselves as progenitors of knowledge. That we must know stuff, and know more than the next guy or gal. That ‘success’ is somehow predicated on acquiring knowledge, owning some form it, and holding onto a knowledge domain for dear life.


If relationships with friends and loved ones are any indicator of how we think we know stuff (and then often realize that we don’t), then perhaps it’s time we also flipped the script on how we do business as it relates to knowledge.


So let’s call bullshit on ourselves.


Well, for the moment at least.

more...
Stephen Dale's curator insight, March 20, 7:42 AM

Memories can be considered dormant or stored expressions of energy. Thoughts can lead us in previously unimagined directions. So perhaps ‘knowledge’ is actually the power in not knowing, as well as realising that what we don’t know matters more than what we think we know. It is the practice of constantly becoming ‘knowledgeable’, or, developing the ability to send and receive knowledge, rather than having to own it or store it.


Reading time: 15mins

Graham Ward's curator insight, March 22, 3:34 PM

Great article which begins with a great question: How does what we know get in the way of what we don't know?

Véronique Calvet's curator insight, April 3, 1:48 PM

“How does what we know get in the way of what we don’t know?” Liz Wiseman

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Older Really Can Mean Wiser

Older Really Can Mean Wiser | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Research is catching up with the idea that, in some ways, people apparently grow smarter with age.


The postdoctoral fellows Joshua Hartshorne of M.I.T. and Laura Germineof Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed a huge trove of scores on cognitive tests taken by people of all ages. The researchers found that the broad split in age-related cognition — fluid in the young, crystallized in the old — masked several important nuances.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Are there distinct, independent elements of memory and cognition that peak at varying times of life?


People in their 40s or 50s consistently did the best, the study found, and the skill declined very slowly later in life.


The picture that emerges from these findings is of an older brain that moves more slowly than its younger self, but is just as accurate in many areas and more adept at reading others’ moods — on top of being more knowledgeable. That’s a handy combination, given that so many important decisions people make intimately affects others.


more...
No comment yet.