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5 Big Discoveries About Personal Effectiveness in 2012

5 Big Discoveries About Personal Effectiveness in 2012 | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Every year brings dozens of new quirky findings about how to be more effective, whether in managing our time, being more creative or just getting things done. Here are some of the highlights from 2012.


Via donhornsby
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This is a fine recap of the latest insights and research in this field. Good work from David Rock, who is the founder of the Neuro Leadership Institute. I had the pleasure of talking to David a few years ago for an article about the influence of neuro science in our modern business world.  

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donhornsby's curator insight, December 28, 2012 9:22 PM

(From the article): We live in a time when where more people are staying connected on vacations. People have forgotten how important it is for your mind to rejuvenate. Research shows that naps improve productivity—a growing body of evidence shows that taking regular breaks from mental tasks improves productivity and creativity — and that skipping breaks can lead to stress and exhaustion.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's comment, December 29, 2012 4:54 AM
Thanks for making me aware of this blog post, Don. Happy holiday season to you. Best, Kenneth
Knowledge Broker
Valuable insights for inquisitive minds. Stuff that makes you go….hmmm, interesting.
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About Knowledge Broker

About Knowledge Broker | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

The purpose of this site - Knowledge Broker - is to highlight and share novel and creative thinking that makes you go: Hmm….interesting


Here I share interesting new books, thought-provoking videos, the latest research into neuroscience, psychology and human behavior, alternative ways of thinking, new innovative ideas, and motivational speeches.


                                                 ★★★★★ 


About Kenneth Mikkelsen


I believe that knowledge is everything. Knowledge is ideas. Knowledge is power. Knowledge is hope. 

But only if it is shared and applied.


That is why I created Knowledge Broker on Scoop.it. My personal aim is to provide you with stories you can learn and grow from. The kind of stories that provokes personal reflection and constructive action. 

I'm co-founder of FutureShifts, a consultancy that helps visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, behaviors and organizational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.


You're welcome to connect via: 

 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kennethmikkelsen

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KennethMikkelsen

Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeadershipABC

 

I hope you'll be inspired.

 

Enjoy!

 

Kenneth

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Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, January 3, 2014 3:29 PM

are you a  knowledge broker?

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Consciousness Is the Whole Brain. It's Not Reducible

Consciousness Is the Whole Brain. It's Not Reducible | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Consciousness is an emergent property of the brain, resulting from the communication of information across all its regions and cannot be reduced to something residing in specific areas.

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Why face-to-face contact matters in our digital age

Why face-to-face contact matters in our digital age | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

In villages in Sardinia, 10 times as many men live past 100 than the average. Why? A key reason is that they are not lonely. Psychologist Susan Pinker on the importance of face-to-face contact in our era of disbanded families and virtual connections.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

There is one place in Europe where both sexes are living long lives. It is an area where, for better or worse, no one is left alone for very long. In what has been dubbed the Age of Loneliness, it’s worth asking what they have that we don’t.


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Chris Shern's curator insight, March 22, 3:52 AM

"In a time where technology and technocrats dominate conversation, the rediscovery of the essence of being human is more important than ever."

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A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute

A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Now that we have hard data on everything, we no longer make decisions from our hearts, guts or principles.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Not long ago, our blockbuster business books spoke in unison: Trust your gut. The secret to decision-making lay outside our intellects, across the aisle in our loopy right brains, with their emo melodramas and surges of intuition. Linear thinking was suddenly the royal road to ruin. Dan Ariely’s “Predictably Irrational” tracked the extravagant illogic of our best judgment calls. The “Freakonomics” authors urged us to think like nut jobs. In “Blink,” Malcolm Gladwell counseled abandoning scientific method in favor of snap judgments. Tedious hours of research, conducted by artless cubicle drones, became the province of companies courting Chapter 11. To the artsy dropouts who could barely grasp a polynomial would go the spoils of the serial bull markets.



No more. The gut is dead. Long live the data, turned out day and night by our myriad computers and smart devices. Not that we trust the data, as we once trusted our guts. Instead, we “optimize” it. We optimize for it. We optimize with it.

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Stephen Dale's curator insight, March 19, 7:56 AM

Data optimisation - the antidote to common sense?

 

Reading time: 8mins

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You and I Change Our Minds. Politicians ‘Evolve.’

You and I Change Our Minds. Politicians ‘Evolve.’ | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it
There is an immediate rush to portray politicians as “flip-floppers” when they shift position on anything, but some are starting to employ a nifty new rhetorical disguise.
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The use of ‘evolve’ as a euphemism continues a long tradition among public figures, namely, framing uncomfortable revelations in a way that diminishes their own role in them.

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My Trouble With Mindfulness

My Trouble With Mindfulness | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Many people struggle to get their head around mindfulness. What is it? What's the benefit? How do you practise it? 



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This is a excellent blog post by Jill Suttie that addresses many of the concerns and questions people raise in relation to mindfulness. 


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Can You Make You Brain As Plastic As a Child’s?

Can You Make You Brain As Plastic As a Child’s? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

A child’s brain can master anything from language to music. Can neuroscience extend that genius across the lifespan?

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

You need to train very hard to learn a skill, even with a critical period opened and plasticity at its height. This lifting of the brakes offers an opportunity for new experiences to sculpt the brain but, just like kids, they don’t get it automatically. They have to work at it.


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The Evolution Catechism

The Evolution Catechism | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Evolutionary biology is not an ideology, which one believes in or doesn’t. What it demands is not belief but what science always demands, and that is the ability to evaluate the evidence and hear out the theory, and to poke holes in it if you can.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Darwinism is true in the complex sense that scientific theories always are - not fixed in its particulars, immutable and imposing, but rich, changing, and evermore explanatory.


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Why Twitter Is Even More Worthless Than You Think

Why Twitter Is Even More Worthless Than You Think | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

At the heart of the media's chattiest technology is a hollow sharing economy. A personal investigation into just how little traffic Twitter's maelstrom actually contributes to websites.


One percent of people who see my tweets click on the links. That's not traffic. It's a rounding error, writes Derek Thompson on The Atlantic. 


Read the full article here

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

It's fair to come away from these metrics thinking that Twitter is worthless. But that's an unsophisticated conclusion. The more sophisticated takeaway is that Twitter is worthless for the limited purpose of driving traffic to your website, because Twitter is not a portal for outbound links, but rather a homepage for self-contained pictures and observations.


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How One Stupid Tweet Blew Up Justine Sacco’s Life

How One Stupid Tweet Blew Up Justine Sacco’s Life | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

The unique 21st-century misery of the online shaming victim.


Beautiful writing. A powerful story about online identity and how public shaming can take off in an instant via social media. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Social media is so perfectly designed to manipulate our desire for approval and attention of strangers.


This is a valuable lesson in today's connected world. 


The extent to which Gawker built a whole business model around the social media viral shaming loop, and the imitators for fun and profit they've spawned, bears closer investigation.

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Chaos of the human brain: How our random thoughts inspire genius — and self-destruction

Chaos of the human brain: How our random thoughts inspire genius — and self-destruction | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Visionaries throughout history reported that intrusive ideas helped them create and caused them anguish. Here's why...


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Too Busy to Think? You May Suffer From 'Hurry Sickness'

Too Busy to Think? You May Suffer From 'Hurry Sickness' | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Eating lunch at your desk while also checking emails and talking on the phone is one symptom. So is doing something else while on conference calls, or even while brushing your teeth. We all find ourselves multitasking now and then, but what about habitually interrupting someone who is talking, or always getting frustrated in a checkout line or in traffic, even when it’s moving along smoothly? When microwaving something for 30 seconds, do you feel the urge to find something else to do while you wait?


If one or more of these sounds all too familiar, you probably have a bad case of a malady that psychologists have dubbed “hurry sickness.”

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Are we losing the ability to stand back and think, and to work smarter rather than harder?



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Better Behaved Behavioral Models

Better Behaved Behavioral Models | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

We often can’t rely on ourselves to act rationally. We know this, but influential social science models have a bad habit of ignoring it. We evolved to frequently act without “deciding.” We are habit-formers and habit-farmers.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Force of habit shapes our lives. Shouldn’t it also shape how our sciences model us?


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Corporate Culture and Workplace Happiness at South by Southwest

Corporate Culture and Workplace Happiness at South by Southwest | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Engaged employees are the harbingers of workforce retention and happiness in the workplace, however numerous companies struggle with creating practices and protocols that result in enthusiastic personnel.


From haphazard questionnaires to ambiguous measurements, countless companies are striving to produce solutions that will boost morale and prevent great team members from leaving, but these companies are falling desperately short of their aspirations.


This begs the questions: Can happiness truly be measured? Can employee engagement be quantifiably tracked? Has the traditional employee engagement industry become obsolete?

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The Brain’s Empathy Gap

The Brain’s Empathy Gap | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Governments and nongovernmental organizations have spent decades perfecting the art of collective persuasion — getting people to do things that are good for them and for society. They have persuaded us to eat more vegetables and to wear our seatbelts, to walk for cures and to give to charity. What has not come so easily is persuading us to identify with — or even tolerate — people we perceive as outsiders. This is especially true when those outsiders form an entire community.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Can mapping neural pathways help us make friends with our enemies?


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The Power of Not Knowing

The Power of Not Knowing | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

When was the last time you said “I don’t know” in a business or organizational context, with the idea that your honesty would actually get you somewhere?







Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Traditional paradigms have taught us that in order to survive, we must position ourselves as progenitors of knowledge. That we must know stuff, and know more than the next guy or gal. That ‘success’ is somehow predicated on acquiring knowledge, owning some form it, and holding onto a knowledge domain for dear life.


If relationships with friends and loved ones are any indicator of how we think we know stuff (and then often realize that we don’t), then perhaps it’s time we also flipped the script on how we do business as it relates to knowledge.


So let’s call bullshit on ourselves.


Well, for the moment at least.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 19, 10:11 PM

Not knowing opens up space for exploring and questioning. It seems to fit with Dewey's theory of learning.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Stephen Dale's curator insight, March 20, 7:42 AM

Memories can be considered dormant or stored expressions of energy. Thoughts can lead us in previously unimagined directions. So perhaps ‘knowledge’ is actually the power in not knowing, as well as realising that what we don’t know matters more than what we think we know. It is the practice of constantly becoming ‘knowledgeable’, or, developing the ability to send and receive knowledge, rather than having to own it or store it.


Reading time: 15mins

Graham Ward's curator insight, March 22, 3:34 PM

Great article which begins with a great question: How does what we know get in the way of what we don't know?

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Older Really Can Mean Wiser

Older Really Can Mean Wiser | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Research is catching up with the idea that, in some ways, people apparently grow smarter with age.


The postdoctoral fellows Joshua Hartshorne of M.I.T. and Laura Germineof Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed a huge trove of scores on cognitive tests taken by people of all ages. The researchers found that the broad split in age-related cognition — fluid in the young, crystallized in the old — masked several important nuances.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Are there distinct, independent elements of memory and cognition that peak at varying times of life?


People in their 40s or 50s consistently did the best, the study found, and the skill declined very slowly later in life.


The picture that emerges from these findings is of an older brain that moves more slowly than its younger self, but is just as accurate in many areas and more adept at reading others’ moods — on top of being more knowledgeable. That’s a handy combination, given that so many important decisions people make intimately affects others.


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Who’s to Blame for the Digital Time Deficit?

Who’s to Blame for the Digital Time Deficit? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

For all the smart tech, we still feel pressed for time. Are digital services the problem, or are we humans to blame?

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Life in the 21st century, we are told, is faster than ever. Time is scarce, the pace of everyday life is accelerating, and everyone complains about how busy they are. High‑speed traders make millions in milliseconds, and people go speed dating where dates lasts around five minutes. Technological innovation, we hear, is dynamic, disruptive, unfolding geometrically, changing everything. But is it true?


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9 TED Talks on How Your Mind Works

9 TED Talks on How Your Mind Works | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Intriguing speakers share psychological studies- from asking kids to wait to eat marshmallows to planting false memories through a single word.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

These fascinating and bizarre psych experiments show how our minds really work.


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This Idea Must Die: Some of the World’s Greatest Thinkers Each Select a Major Misconception Holding Us Back

This Idea Must Die: Some of the World’s Greatest Thinkers Each Select a Major Misconception Holding Us Back | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Each year, John Brockman, publisher of Edge.org challenges some of the world’s greatest scientists, artists, and philosophers to answer a provocative question crucial to our time. In 2014 he asked 175 brilliant minds to ponder: What scientific idea needs to be put aside in order to make room for new ideas to advance?


The answers are as surprising as they are illuminating:


  • Steven Pinker dismantles the working theory of human behavior
  • Richard Dawkins renounces essentialism
  • Sherry Turkle reevaluates our expectations of artificial intelligence
  • Geoffrey West challenges the concept of a “Theory of Everything”
  • Andrei Linde suggests that our universe and its laws may not be as unique as we think
  • Martin Rees explains why scientific understanding is a limitless goal
  • Nina Jablonski argues to rid ourselves of the concept of race
  • Alan Guth rethinks the origins of the universe
  • Hans Ulrich Obrist warns against glorifying unlimited economic growth
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This is a curated post by Maria Popova from Brain Pickings. 


Watch also this video with Jesse Dylan where he talks about the book. 


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ToKTutor's curator insight, March 2, 10:23 AM

Title 1: What scientific idea is ready for retirement: non-neutral Q to help progress of knowledge.

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How Reading Transforms Us

How Reading Transforms Us | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Most writing seeks to influence you to think or feel how the author wants you to think or feel. The article you are reading now is no exception. We want you to think about certain things in a certain way.


But there’s another kind of influence, not typically associated with writing, that works in a different fashion. Here, you don’t try to make people think or feel in any particular way. Instead, you try to get them to be themselves.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Could a writer have an indirect influence of this kind, getting readers to think about themselves anew?


Art doesn’t try to dictate what you think. It helps you change yourself.


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8 Classic Storytelling Techniques for Engaging Presentations

8 Classic Storytelling Techniques for Engaging Presentations | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

A good public speaker takes their audience on a journey, leaving them feeling inspired and motivated. But structuring your speech to get your ideas across and keep your audience engaged all the way through is tricky.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Try these eight storytelling techniques for a presentation that wows. HT @Nik Peachey. 

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Chris Shern's curator insight, February 17, 11:24 AM

Very useful article with practical explaination including actual video examples.

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Altering your Brainwaves: The Secret to Personal Transformation

Altering your Brainwaves: The Secret to Personal Transformation | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

The short end of the stick is that all inner change or personal transformation happens at a deeper level of consciousness. No matter how brilliant our thoughts and ideas are, they are not sufficient to bring about real change. When it comes down to making powerful and positive shifts in our life, knowledge by itself is superfluous. That means that you can conceptually and rationally grasp the secrets of the universe but you can only put them into practice by integrating them into your totality of self.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Constant shifts in the 21st century have obliterated the notion that we ever can arrive at a settled and predictable destination. This prompts a key question: In a changing world, how can we ensure the success of ourselves as individuals, our companies, our communities and the planet?


The Great Transformation we face in society is not only about changing how organizations operate. In many cases it also involves a personal transformation in terms of a mind shift, skill shift and behavior shift. 


This article takes a closer look at personal transformation journeys from a neuroscience perspective. 


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Why Smart People Are Stupid

Why Smart People Are Stupid | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

When people face an uncertain situation, they don’t carefully evaluate the information or look up relevant statistics. Instead, their decisions depend on a long list of mental shortcuts, which often lead them to make foolish decisions.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Perhaps our most dangerous bias is that we naturally assume that everyone else is more susceptible to thinking errors, a tendency known as the “bias blind spot.”


This “meta-bias” is rooted in our ability to spot systematic mistakes in the decisions of others—we excel at noticing the flaws of friends—and inability to spot those same mistakes in ourselves.


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The Greatest Lesson I Never Learned

The Greatest Lesson I Never Learned - Bad Words - Medium

Perhaps meaning asks nothing else of us—for possibility demands nothing less of us. To stand naked, shoulder to shoulder, with all the people we may become. And each morning, with them, dive into the endless sea. For that is how we find our way home. With love, through freedom, into truth.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Umair had many teachers. And each taught him a single line. You should read it. Excellence, it is. In writing. 


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How to Let Your Life Speak, Discern Your Purpose, and Define Your Own Success

How to Let Your Life Speak, Discern Your Purpose, and Define Your Own Success | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

For the century and a half since, and undoubtedly the many centuries before, the question of how to kindle that soul-warming fire by finding one’s purpose and making a living out of meaningful work has continued to frustrate not only the young, not only aspiring artists, but people of all ages, abilities, and walks of life. How to navigate that existential maze with grace is what Parker J. Palmer — founder of the Center for Courage & Renewal and a man of great insight into the elusive art of inner wholeness — explores with compassionate warmth and wisdom in his 1999 book Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation


This story is Scooped from Maria Popova's excellent Brain Pickings. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

What it takes to learn to listen to the timid wild animal that is the soul.


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Andrea Dean's curator insight, February 8, 11:26 PM

Love the work and writings of Parker Palmer:"Before you tell your life what you intend to do with it, listen for what it intends to do with you. Before you tell your life what truths and values you have decided to live up to, let your life tell you what truths you embody, what values you represent."