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Valuable insights for inquisitive minds. Stuff that makes you go….hmmm, interesting.
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The Brain’s Empathy Gap

The Brain’s Empathy Gap | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Governments and nongovernmental organizations have spent decades perfecting the art of collective persuasion — getting people to do things that are good for them and for society. They have persuaded us to eat more vegetables and to wear our seatbelts, to walk for cures and to give to charity. What has not come so easily is persuading us to identify with — or even tolerate — people we perceive as outsiders. This is especially true when those outsiders form an entire community.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Can mapping neural pathways help us make friends with our enemies?


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9 TED Talks on How Your Mind Works

9 TED Talks on How Your Mind Works | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Intriguing speakers share psychological studies- from asking kids to wait to eat marshmallows to planting false memories through a single word.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

These fascinating and bizarre psych experiments show how our minds really work.


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Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, May 24, 11:07 AM

For the psyc student...

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Why Clay Shirky Banned Laptops, Tablets and Phones from His Classroom

Why Clay Shirky Banned Laptops, Tablets and Phones from His Classroom | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

People often start multi-tasking because they believe it will help them get more done. Those gains never materialize; instead, efficiency is degraded. However, it provides emotional gratification as a side-effect. This side-effect is enough to keep people committed to multi-tasking despite worsening the very thing they set out to improve.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This problem is especially acute with social media, because on top of the general incentive for any service to be verbose about its value, social information is immediately and emotionally engaging.

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How Does Writing Affect Your Brain?

How Does Writing Affect Your Brain? | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

According to today’s infographic, writing can serve as a calming, meditative tool. Stream of conscious writing exercises, in particular, have been identified as helpful stress coping methods. Keeping a journal, for example, or trying out free-writing exercises, can drastically reduce your levels of stress.


Via Dennis T OConnor, Christine Heine, AlGonzalezinfo
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Cathy Ternent Dyer's curator insight, August 7, 2013 10:22 PM

Great information! Thanks to Elvira for telling me about it. :)
I've always said that keeping a journal is cheap therapy! 

Ann Kenady's curator insight, February 5, 2014 11:24 PM

Massage your brain....

Chris Shern's curator insight, February 1, 5:39 AM

The power of putting pen to paper helps to make sense of a world increasingly filled with noise.

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Older Really Can Mean Wiser

Older Really Can Mean Wiser | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Research is catching up with the idea that, in some ways, people apparently grow smarter with age.


The postdoctoral fellows Joshua Hartshorne of M.I.T. and Laura Germineof Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital analyzed a huge trove of scores on cognitive tests taken by people of all ages. The researchers found that the broad split in age-related cognition — fluid in the young, crystallized in the old — masked several important nuances.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Are there distinct, independent elements of memory and cognition that peak at varying times of life?


People in their 40s or 50s consistently did the best, the study found, and the skill declined very slowly later in life.


The picture that emerges from these findings is of an older brain that moves more slowly than its younger self, but is just as accurate in many areas and more adept at reading others’ moods — on top of being more knowledgeable. That’s a handy combination, given that so many important decisions people make intimately affects others.


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The Brain - Princeton Alumni Weekly

The Brain - Princeton Alumni Weekly | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

What scientists are learning about how we think, learn, and remember - and how our lives could change as a result.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Princeton Alumni Weekly's January 2015 edition on the brain. Down the magazine in a PDF version by clicking the image above. 


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The Neuroscience Of Trusting Your Gut

The Neuroscience Of Trusting Your Gut | Knowledge Broker | Scoop.it

Why should you trust your gut? Because science says it's the foundation of rational decision making. Rather than being opposed, emotion and reason are deeply interrelated: if you're going to make sound and rational decisions.

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