Kindergarden Readiness
31 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Md. in forefront of school-readiness tests starting in kindergarten

Md. in forefront of school-readiness tests starting in kindergarten | Kindergarden Readiness | Scoop.it
In November, schools will be compiling readiness assessments for all students in kindergarten.
Julie Newman's insight:

This article slightly differs from the rest of my content curations on kindergarten readiness because it describes assessments taking place after the child is already in kindergarten. However, I thought this article was very important because it describes how students are being tested in kindergarten to measure their readiness and their academic "starting line". This article describes how the federal government is providing grants to many states to create this new test and have it align with the common core. The article describes these new tests as being able to help spotlight academic achievement gaps at the starting line, rather than waiting until third grade to being testing students abilities. This article caused me to have very mixed feelings. At first I was very taken aback by this because I feel like standardized testing is not a very accurate way to test a students abilities, because there are all types of learners. However, after re-reading this article, while my opinion on standardized tests in higher education remains the same, I feel as if this type of test to assess a students starting point can be proven beneficial. This test can provide the kindergarten teacher with the information they need about how "ready for kindergarten" their students were, what basic skills they lack, and how wide the achievement gap between students is. The closing line of this article states that "advocates of early education are concerned that the information will be used to make high -stakes decisions by tracking students, for example, or delaying their entry into kindergarten.' This concerns me that the standardized test information will be used to make rash decisions for a student, when not every standardized test can truly asses all students abilities. Instead of helping students  develop their weaknesses, it will prevent them form even getting a chance in kindergarten in the first place if the results is to hold a student back. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Kindergarten readiness: Are shy kids at an academic disadvantage?

Kindergarten readiness: Are shy kids at an academic disadvantage? | Kindergarden Readiness | Scoop.it
Parents of young children hope for a successful kindergarten experience that will set their youngsters on the right path of their educational journey.
Julie Newman's insight:

I found this article very interesting because it focuses on social-emotional readiness for kindergarten and not just academic readiness. This is something I have not come across in any of my research thus far. This article summarizes a new study done by the University of Miami that shows that overly shy preschool children are at a treaters academic risk than their more outgoing and talkative peers. This study talks about how shy children in the classroom have trouble engaging and learning, especially because behavioral problems develop in classrooms when there is a gap between a child's developmental skills and the expectations of the classroom. The article also expresses that those students who are more outspoken and disruptive might gain more of the teachers attention than the child who does not speak as much. The study suggests that encouraging the development of appropriate classroom mannerisms is very important, especially in early childhood programs. The study also concluded that "older kids and girls tended to be better adjusted to the class, exhibited less behavioral problems, and had higher levels of social literacy, language, and math skills." This article truly addresses that kindergarten readiness does not only mean if your child can count, knows their ABC's and colors. I believe it is of equal importance to assess your child's social skills in relation to classroom expectations to make sure that your child will not get overwhelmed with a structured classroom setting once entered into kindergarten. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Hillary Clinton Targets Littlest Learners

Hillary Clinton Targets Littlest Learners | Kindergarden Readiness | Scoop.it
As Head Start centers around the country close because of the federal government shutdown, Hillary Clinton is advancing herself as an advocate for the nation's littlest learners -- an important, popular and risk-free position.
Julie Newman's insight:

After reading this article and watching the accompanying news clip, I definitely feel more exposed to the truths about the importance of early education. I believe that Hillary Clinton's push to expand early education is of the upmost importance. One startling fact in this article that grabbed my attention was the proven fact that the availability of early education is creating a widening gap between the upper/middle class and lower class children before they even start school. This is because by the times children turn four years old, upper/middle class children hear 30 million more words than children whose families are on welfare. I found this fact to be astounding because, as Clinton says, "coming to school without words is like coming to school without food or adequate health care. It makes it harder for kids to develop their creativity and imagination, to learn, excel, and live up to their full potential." This fact alone I feel shows how important early education is to children's future, making it of the upmost importance that we work to make early education available to as many children as possible. I believe that Clinton's "Too Small To Fail" will attack this problem head on by aiming to educate the parents of these children, because they are the ones that can make a difference in their parents lives. This campaign is working towards educating parents and pushing for more workplace flexibility. In all, I think this article shows that progress is being made to advance early education in America. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Virginia's Kindergarten Readiness Project - Elevate Early Education

Virginia's Kindergarten Readiness Project - Elevate Early Education | Kindergarden Readiness | Scoop.it
As part of Governor McDonnell's K-12 reform agenda, E3 is working with the Department of Education, the University of Virginia CASTL, and the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation to conduct the Virginia Kindergarten ...
Julie Newman's insight:

After reading this article, I have become really informed in the issues with many kindergarten readiness programs and what certain states are doing to change this. In Virginia, the Virginia Kindergarten Readiness Project is working to reform screenings of children to see how prepared they are for kindergarten. I was so surprised that there used to be only screening for a child's readiness to read. With this new program, they are including the assessment of social and personal development, mathematical thinking, scientific thinking, social studies, the arts, and physical development. I think that the addition of these screenings will greatly help the not only to see if these children are prepared for kindergarten, but also aid in screening for learning disabilities and delays as well which I find very important. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Early childhood education key to future success | Mission: Readiness

Kalamazoo Gazette (MI) – By Gerald A. Miller, Major General, US Army (Retired) – Local law enforcement officials made important points about the value of early learning to reducing crime. I also see a link to national security.
Julie Newman's insight:

This blog states the importance and value of early education to reduce crime and increase long-term success. This military blog shows that early education can be the key to ones ability to be in the military. This is because some of the disqualifies to be in the military include lack of an education, obesity, and criminal record. I agree that early education can be one of the most influential factors in escaping those three fates. Examples of successful early education programs include Michigan's Great Start Readiness Program (GSRP) which has been proven to reduce the repetition of grades, and increase graduation rates in its students. Overall, I agree with the message of this blog stating the vast importance of having our children embrace education starting at an early age. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Importance of early childhood education emphasized at GEMS Conference - AME Info (press release)

Importance of early childhood education emphasized at GEMS Conference - AME Info (press release) | Kindergarden Readiness | Scoop.it
Importance of early childhood education emphasized at GEMS Conference AME Info (press release) As early childhood education is becoming a strong focus around the world, GEMS Education and The Little GEMS International (LGI) method is at the...
Julie Newman's insight:

According to professor Pat Preedy, the Chief Global Academic Officer for Early Childhood GEMS Education, "It has been scientifically proven that the pre-school years are the most important, as they lay the foundations for future learning and success" I always believed in the importance of pre-school education, but after reading this article and learning Preedy's approach, I definitely believe in its true importance. Preedy explains that the key to LGI, The Little GEMS International, method is a multi-ssenory approach to sensory, auditory, real, and kinesthetic learning experiences. I believe this this new "SPARKLE" program is going to be groundbreaking in early childhood education and its effects will be successful. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Language-Gap Study Bolsters a Push for Pre-K

Language-Gap Study Bolsters a Push for Pre-K | Kindergarden Readiness | Scoop.it
A Stanford psychologist found that affluent children had learned 30 percent more words from 18 months to 2 years of age than children from low-income homes.
Julie Newman's insight:

I found this article to be very informative and factual in presenting its information on the importance of early education to reduce the widely growing language gap we see in our children today. This is an issue that I have seen resurface through most of my research. This article reinforces the idea that children whom come into kindergarten with a higher level of language and word comprehension are more likely to be more successful in school. The one aspect of this article that is a new persecutive for me is the relation between family income and the child's literacy ability. This article states that children of wealthier families hear millions of more words than those children of low income families whom do not talk to their children as much. Since oral language and vocabulary are so connoted to reading comprehension, this causes children with a lower ability in these categories to be at a disadvantage when they enter school. While this article does talk about our need to increase pre-kindergarten programs for low-income children, referring to President Obama's use of state money to provide preschool for all 4-year-olds from low-income families, it also emphasizes the importance of the parents and the influence families can have on this situation. This is a angle that I have not seen taken in other articles I have read. I agree with this aspect of the article. Yes, we can increase preschool programs and their availability for all children, but I believe that if the child is not continuously stimulated at home through experiences and conversations, there will still be this widening language gap we see growing everyday. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Kindergarten Readiness

Making sure your kids are ready to start school.
Julie Newman's insight:

This video discussed how expectations for students entering kindergarten has changed dramatically throughout the past decades. While writing your name, learning the colors of the rainbow, and counting all used to be things learned in kindergarten, they are now seen as things you should know prior to entering kindergarten. While in the early 1990s, the expectations of kindergarten was to focus more on the socialization of the children while beginning some of the reading and writing skills. Now we grow these skills in kindergarten farther than we ever have before. This video focuses on how parents can help in their child's readiness by immersing them in life experience such as taking them to the library, counting with them, taking them to the zoo, art museum or aquarium. Engaging in these experience allow for parents to engage their child and have things to talk about with them. Overall, the increasing standards for kindergarten readiness falls heavily on both the teacher to meet these new expectations, as well as the parent to make sure their child is well prepared. I found this video really interesting because throughout my research on kindergarten readiness, I have found that many put the pressures of kindergarten readiness on pre-k programs. This video, however, puts the emphasis on what you can do as a parent to help your child become emerged in world experiences. Personally, I believe  combination of the two is what is going to lead to a child's top success once entered into kindergarten. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Scarsdale, NY 10583 | Kindergarten: Where Six is the New Five. Or is it? | Schools | Your Community Corner

Scarsdale, NY 10583 | Kindergarten: Where Six is the New Five. Or is it? | Schools | Your Community Corner | Kindergarden Readiness | Scoop.it
What's the right age to start kindergarten? Surprising data reveals that ultimately younger children fare better in school
Julie Newman's insight:
I was really interested in reading this article because I grew up in Scarsdale, New York and went through the public school system. This article discussed the issue of "redshirting", holding a child back one year so he or she enters kindergarten a year after they are eligible to. This article made very important points about both the benefits and consequences of redshirting a child. The article talked about four resins why a parent might redshirt their child. The parent might be genuinely concerned about their child's kindergarten readiness in terms of emotional or academic development, the parent might believe redshirting will give their child a competitive edge over others because of data they read, or the parent might be persuaded by other parents in the community to redshirt their child. No matter the reason, data clearly shows that redshirting, in fact, does not give a child any advantage and the advantage kids have when redshirted decreases as the chi.d's age increases. 
This article included many first hand accounts from parents within the Scarsdale school system about their decision to either redshirt their child or start them in kindergarten on time and their reaction to their decision. Coming from Scarsdale, I know that it is a very competitive academic community. Therefore, I feel as if many parents decide to redshirt their child because they believe they might have an advantage or "extra preparation". My opinion, however, is not for or against redshirting. I agree with the statement at the end of the article that expresses that every child is different and there are some children whom are just not ready for kindergarten when they are technically eligible. I believe each child needs to be assessed individually and parents should make a decision that will best benefit their child's needs. I do disagree with parents who redshirt their children because of social pressure or just to give them that edge. If a child is redshirted, I believe it should only be because if they were placed in a formal classroom setting, they would not be ready to handle the material. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Are Early Childhood Education Programs Developmentally Appropriate? Panel of Experts Respond. |

Are Early Childhood Education Programs Developmentally Appropriate? Panel of Experts Respond. | | Kindergarden Readiness | Scoop.it
RT @Dr_Armstrong: Are Early Childhood Education Programs Developmentally Appropriate? Panel of Experts Respond. - http://t.co/OubcWliRBc
Julie Newman's insight:

This podcast called "The Whole Child Podcast" most recent episode titled "Early Childhood Education: Balancing Expectations and What Young Learnings Really Need" was very enlightening. This podcast discussed the pressures placed on early childhood educators to prepare their students for the rigorous academics of higher education. This has been a constant debate because many, including myself, believe that these pressures take away from the milt-sensory experiences that a child should be exposed to at a young age. This podcast did an amazing job referencing this controversy and I recommend watching!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Julie Newman
Scoop.it!

Raise awareness for early childhood education with Jumpstart

Raise awareness for early childhood education with Jumpstart | Kindergarden Readiness | Scoop.it
Many parents enjoy reading with their kids.
Julie Newman's insight:

I believe that kindergarden readiness is of the upmost importance, so when I heard about the national "Read for the Record" event, it showed me that people are truly making a difference each day in making sure more and more kinds across America enter into Kindergarden prepared. This event held on October 3rd, supported the program Jumpstart's mission to work toward the day that every child enters into Kindergarden prepared to succeed. On this day, millions of people pledge to read for their kids in support of Jumpstart's mission. The book read this year was "Otis", by Loren Long. I think this mission is so important and i am thrilled that more and more people are taking the pledge to promote kindergarden readiness across America. Throughout my research, I have not yet come across any other national movement to support kindergarten readiness that involves the parents and children themsevles. This event is not only uniquw, but sends an amazing message by working towards increasing kindergarten readiness, one book at a time. 

more...
No comment yet.