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Art – an opportunity to develop children’s skills — Better Kid Care (Penn State Extension)

Art – an opportunity to develop children’s skills — Better Kid Care (Penn State Extension) | kinderart | Scoop.it
As young children explore paint by putting it all over their hands, or create collages with torn paper, it’s noticeable how involved they get in their activities. Children delight in exploring and creating with art materials. These art experiences help children develop many life skills.
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Benefits of Arts to Kids

Benefits of Arts to Kids | kinderart | Scoop.it
Read about the effect of arts on your kid's brain, the importance of art in his education, and tips on how to involve kids in the arts.
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The Importance of Art in Children's Cognitive, Social and Emotional Development

The Importance of Art in Children's Cognitive, Social and Emotional Development | kinderart | Scoop.it
Most of us instinctually know that art is important for children. Those of us who work with children regularly can see that they get deeply involved in art and
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Why Art is Important for Young Children | Education.com

Why Art is Important for Young Children | Education.com | kinderart | Scoop.it
Looks at the beliefs that have shaped our ways of seeing the child, art, and teaching and how we can scaffold young children's learning through art.
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Art in Early Childhood: Curriculum Connections

Art in Early Childhood: Curriculum Connections | kinderart | Scoop.it
Earlychildhood NEWS is the online resource for teachers and parents of young children, infants to age 8. You will find articles about developmentally appropriate practice, child health, safety and behavior as well as links to teacher resources and networking opportunities.
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suite parent: How To Develop Children's Artistic Skills

suite parent: How To Develop Children's Artistic Skills | kinderart | Scoop.it

Via cherki hosri
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cherki hosri's curator insight, July 13, 2013 3:13 PM
Almost all children love to draw. And for a child there isn't anything impossible to draw. Up to a certain age a child is able to draw everything. And though his/her drawings only vaguely resemble real objects, it seems to him/her that his/her drawings are really perfect. The drawing process is very useful itself for the development and formation of the child's personality. But how can you help your children to develop and refine their artistic talents so that incomprehensible scribbles turned into meaningful beautiful art works?

First, you need to provide your child with all the necessary tools for drawing. He/she needs some paper, pens, pencils, paints, brushes. And the richer and wider the choice of drawing tools he/she has, the greater his/her ability to create beautiful colorful paintings. In this way your child will learn to combine different colors and be creative. Show him/her how to use different creative art materials, how to pick up the paint on the brush so it does not drip, how to mix colors. Such knowledge will greatly help your child in his/her future creative experiments.

Tip two: avoid criticism. Of course, you want everything to be perfect, but do not rush to correct. You'd better praise, encourage and show sincere interest in your child's drawings. If your child shows you his/her work, pay attention to it, point out successful details so that your child would want to draw more and more. You must create an atmosphere of trust, and excellence will come later.

Tip three: try different unconventional painting techniques. This is not only novel and exciting, but such techniques also encourage children to use their imagination and to create something of their own. For example, cover a sheet of paper with wax or paraffin, then cover it with ink, and when the sheet becomes dry, you can scratch a drawing with a pointed pen or a sharp drawing tool. Also you can try to make imprints of different items on the sheet, for example, imprints of cut-off vegetables, autumn leaves and blades of grass, and any other items. Instead of using your brush, paint with cotton buds, or you can make an amazing drawing with colored dots. Moreover, you can try to draw not only on paper. Recently, there have appeared programs and mobile applications that teach children to draw right on the screen. And it can be very interesting and new for a child to draw with a stylus on the screen. Besides, such applications include step by step instructions and diagrams and children easily learn how to draw different objects by following step-by-step instructions.

The fourth point is to make a game out of the drawing lesson. For example, game tasks may include the following: draw a geometric figure and ask your child to finish it, thus, making this figure turn into another object. A circle can be turned into the sun by painting some rays of light; in a flower by painting a stem and petals; in a face by adding eyes, a nose and a mouth; in a car wheel by drawing a car. Then draw another shape, and let your child use his/her imagination by transforming this shape. Apart from playing with geometric shapes, another game is possible, too: show your child a few unfinished drawings, and let him/her finish them. For example, draw a table without legs, a dog without a tail, a cow without horns, a house without windows, and the child has to find what is missing and to finish the picture. These games help to develop imagination and creative thinking by children.

Finally, teach your children to notice surrounding objects, their shape and colors, as well as imagery and expressiveness. These tasks can be achieved, for example, by asking to find a resemblance between different objects. Geometric shapes can be converted into real objects or animals. Or you can ask your children to name a few characteristic features of an object, for example, the wind is warm and gentle, the rain is sad and melancholic.

And most important, remember that each child is a creator. Your purpose is to support him/her, motivate, assist in developing in the right direction. Cultivate artistic creativity in your children by drawing their attention to subtle peculiarities of the surrounding world. Be patient, and then the result will not disappoint your expectations.

 



About the Author:
Early education is essential for raising educated, talented, and friendly children. If you are a parent, it is very important to take care of children in lots of fields including education, mentoring, character building, and so on. On How to Draw mobile app website howtodrawapp.com you will find a lot of interesting and educative information about the arts, drawing tutorials for kids, drawing lessons, and drawing tips and tricks. Red more :http://suiteparent.blogspot.com
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Arts-heavy Preschool Helps Children Grow Emotionally -

Arts-heavy Preschool Helps Children Grow Emotionally - | kinderart | Scoop.it
"daily music, visual arts & creative movement classes" Arts-heavy Preschool Helps Children Grow... http://t.co/eJg0Cz7r ...adults too?
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Art is “vital” for children’s cognitive development

Art is “vital” for children’s cognitive development | kinderart | Scoop.it
Technology plays an ever-increasing role in children’s production of art. All that is needed now are a few gestures or to slide a finger over a tablet screen. But is this to detriment of young people’s skills?

Via Tech Pig
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Art Appreciation for Children: Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS ...

Art Appreciation for Children: Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS ... | kinderart | Scoop.it

Art Appreciation for Children - Image Envision. VTS encourages children to talk about art in a meaningful way. It helps foster critical thinking skills that can be applied to all other subject areas. Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) ...


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Art Activities for Children

http://theturbulencetraining.com/art-activities-for-children.html Art activities for children in schools are meant for fun and entertainment along with gaining practical experience and knowledge about the things happening around us. Many schools have made participation in these activities compulsory. Grades are given to the students after taking into...


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Sendak, Carle, Provensen, and 20 Other Beloved Illustrators Talk to Children about Their Art

Sendak, Carle, Provensen, and 20 Other Beloved Illustrators Talk to Children about Their Art | kinderart | Scoop.it
"No story is worth the writing, no picture worth the making, if it's not the work of the imagination."

"Every child is an artist," Picass

Via Daniel Brooks
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Kindergarten considers their past, present, and future | ES Art Class

As the kindergarteners pursue their year-long unit with Ms. Tasha and Ms. Zoe -- "the idea that personal journeys show the way that people can change and lead to opportunities"

 

Here is a great visual art idea where Kindergarten students at an International school in Japan create three pieces of work representing themselves in their past, present and future- as a baby, kindergartener and grown up. This exercise can be used to illustrate and discuss change in their lives both past and present. Included in the drawings are the clothes that they wear as well as favourite toys and special objects. They may annotate these drawings to explain further detail and any special features in order to develop writing skills with help from the teacher. These portraits are based on their memories, imagination and knowledge of themselves. Students may ask their parents information about themselves for their drawings.  Prior to this activity, students will be required to bring photos of themselves as a baby and/or at different ages as well as objects from home that have been significant to them in their lives.  They will be told that these items will be used at ‘news time’ and as group discussion points. A guided discussion may cover objects, toys, games, past experiences, interests when students were babies as well as now. Further questions include how has your body changed? And how has your thinking changed? Items from home will be used in the missing object game where items are taken away and children must recall the missing objects. Using themselves as subjects, their own prior knowledge and objects that are meaningful to them will help cement learning (Piaget 1963). Students will present and talk about their finished drawings with the class.

 

Literature that may be used with this topic include Peek-a-Boo by Janet and Allen Ahlberg, You’ll Soon Grow Into Them Titch by Pat Hutchins, Now we are Six poem by AA.Milne and The Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. Using literature that involves age and counting could easily be used in conjunction with mathematics. Students could make adding and subtracting number sentences using the brought in objects as well as themselves as items. The group could also try a Peek-a-Boo type of game where eyes are closed or objects are concealed and then taken away.

 

Piaget, J. (1963).The Origins of Intelligence in Children. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.


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Art school program developing children’s creative minds

Art school program developing children’s creative minds | kinderart | Scoop.it
Blank Canvases is an art program that brings local Toronto artists from Walnut Studios, a local art studio, into a school to work with students to develop art projects. Niagara Street Public School decided to partner with this program to allow students to grow creatively.
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The Importance of Art in Child Development . Music & Arts . Education | PBS Parents

The Importance of Art in Child Development . Music & Arts . Education | PBS Parents | kinderart | Scoop.it
Although some may regard art education as a luxury, simple creative activities are some of the building blocks of child development. Learn more about the developmental benefits of art.
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The Importance of Art in a Child's Development, by MaryAnn F. Kohl - Barnes & Noble

The Importance of Art in a Child's Development, by MaryAnn F. Kohl - Barnes & Noble | kinderart | Scoop.it
Art may seem like fun and games - and it is! - but you may not realize that your child can actually learn a lot through exploring the arts and doing art activities - Read this article from the Barnes & Noble Expert Circle
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Ideas for Integrating Art Into Early Childhood Development

Ideas for Integrating Art Into Early Childhood Development | kinderart | Scoop.it
Young children are naturally drawn to art projects, and can spend hours drawing, painting, sculpting, cutting and pasting. Perhaps this is because children feel a sense of emotional satisfaction when ...
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The Value of Art for the Preschool Child | Education.com

The Value of Art for the Preschool Child | Education.com | kinderart | Scoop.it
Highlights the importance of art in all areas of an early learning program. Read how art can enhance young children's understanding of math, science and language.
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Forget the Fridge: How to Display Your Child’s Artwork - Nerdy With Children

Forget the Fridge: How to Display Your Child’s Artwork - Nerdy With Children | kinderart | Scoop.it
Forget the fridge, your kid's artwork can do better than that: http://t.co/8qOD7OLHy5 … #diy via @nerdywithkids ~ I print it to wear it also

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The Top-10 Skills Children Learn From the Arts

The Top-10 Skills Children Learn From the Arts | kinderart | Scoop.it

 

1. Creativity 

2. Confidence

3. Problem Solving

4. Perseverance

5. Focus

6. Non-Verbal Communication

7. Receiving Constructive Feedback

8. Collaboration

9. Dedication

10. Accountability

 

Read more.


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What do you wish you had known about making art with children? | TinkerLab --- Creative Projects for Kids

What do you wish you had known about making art with children? | TinkerLab --- Creative Projects for Kids | kinderart | Scoop.it

What do you wish you had known about making art with children? What tips do you have for parents who are just starting out?


Via Zaziceva
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Creative Art Helps Children Develop across Many Domains - L'ART CREATIU AJUDA AL DESENVOLUPAMENT DELS INFANTS D'UNA MANERA TRANSVERSAL

Creative Art Helps Children Develop across Many Domains - L'ART CREATIU AJUDA AL DESENVOLUPAMENT DELS INFANTS D'UNA MANERA TRANSVERSAL | kinderart | Scoop.it
Young children can practice many important skills through art activities. Creative art activities can help children in all areas of development...

Via NÚRIA MACANÁS
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What Can You Learn From Children's Art?

What Can You Learn From Children's Art? | kinderart | Scoop.it
Here are some things you can learn from children’s art to become a better artists.

Via stan stewart
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ECRP. Vol 3 No 1. Reflections and Impressions from Reggio Emilia: "It's Not about Art!"

This article discusses an early childhood program administrator's reflections on her visit to the preschools of Reggio Emilia, Italy.

Via Cristina Fernandes
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