Kill The Record Industry
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Kill The Record Industry
Kill The Record Industry / Save The Music
Curated by Pierre Priot
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Why Dropping Music on Friday Is Pivotal (Hint: It’s Not Sales)

Why Dropping Music on Friday Is Pivotal (Hint: It’s Not Sales) | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
For those signed to smaller labels, New Music Friday might actually be a disservice. Tuesday releases, says Matador Records founder Chris Lombardi, allowed a few days for music sites to cover the smaller artists’ offerings before the weekend rush. Now, he says, “it clogs media. You’re gonna be competing with stuff with a massive campaign behind it: lots of advertising, lots of editorial real estate on blogs and newspapers and magazines.”
Pierre Priot's insight:
Music Friday doesn't seem to work out as expected for everyone
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UMG recorded music revenues up 2.4% as streaming offsets physical decline

UMG recorded music revenues up 2.4% as streaming offsets physical decline | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Universal Music Group’s recorded music revenues were up 2.4% in 2015 thanks to growth in streaming, which “more than offset” the decline in physical and download revenues.

Total UMG revenues were up 2.7% at constant currency, up by €5.11 billion (£3.98 billion).

Streaming accounting for 52% of digital recorded music revenues in H2 2015 and streaming revenue was up 47% across the year, while downloads declined 13%, according to yesterday's earnings release by parent company Vivendi.
Pierre Priot's insight:

UMG scores revenue growth thanks to the physical to streaming shift.
Isn't it exactly what I was rambling about is that piece: http://bit.ly/DigiTransition

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2015 U.S. Music Year-End Report

2015 U.S. Music Year-End Report | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Aside from the excitement about Adele’s “25” at year-end, on-demand audio and video streaming continued to gain in popularity in 2015, posting growth rates of 83% and 102%, respectively. Vinyl also posted its 10th consecutive year of sales growth.
Pierre Priot's insight:

Nielsen's US Music Industry Report for 2015 is out. 
Long story short: Vinyl's keeping up strong, streaming going off the roof. 

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Austin Alderfer's curator insight, January 12, 5:21 PM

Again, another visual aspect on where music is going with end of 2015 stats. Streaming is easily taking over. Artist need to realize that streaming is the way of the future and need to accept that and move away from the olden days of cd sales. 

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RIAA - RIAA 2015 Mid-Year Music Sales and Revenue Numbers Released - September 22, 2015

RIAA - RIAA 2015 Mid-Year Music Sales and Revenue Numbers Released - September 22, 2015 | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

"The data continues to reflect the story of a business undergoing an enormous transition. There are many positive signs: continuing the trend from 2014, wholesale revenues for the first half of 2015 increased. And revenues from streaming music services continue to grow at a healthy double digit rate. The product of music and the extraordinary roster of artists represented by today’s music labels remains in high demand. That is the bedrock of a successful future.

At the same time, intense demand and billions of streams does not always equal fair market rates or a fair playing field. Addressing that is an essential element of fulfilling the enormous promise of today’s digital marketplace.”

 

- RIAA Chairman and CEO Cary Sherman

Pierre Priot's insight:

US digital music revenue is growing, RIAA claims, despite its shift from download sales to streaming.

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Nzinga Austin's curator insight, September 14, 2:06 PM
I am curious to see the direction music will take over the next 5 years 
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La venta de música grabada sube un 11% en España gracias al streaming

La venta de música grabada sube un 11% en España gracias al streaming | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Afortunadamente la tendencia positiva que presentó el mercado español de música grabada el año pasado continúa siendo una realidad en los primeros 6 meses del año, dejando atrás las malas rachas consecutivas padecidas entre 2001 y 2013. Promusicae, y es que la venta acumulada del presente año asciende a 70,6€ millones de euros, una cifra que representa una mejoría del 10,9% respecto a los 63,6 millones registrados en idéntico período de 2014.
Pierre Priot's insight:

With 54% of the market sales, streaming boosts Spain's record industry global sales up by 10,93%. Face it, digital can only raise industry revenues once it has stepped upon physical.

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Music streaming doubles as plays reach almost 15 billion in a year

Music streaming doubles as plays reach almost 15 billion in a year | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Data from Kantar Worldpanel showed that over a quarter of adults (26.8%) used a dedicated music streaming service such as Spotify, Deezer, Google Play or Rdio at some point in 2014, with around 1 in 16 adults using the paid tier of one for at least part of the year.

The BPI’s report also revealed a slow-down in the rate of decline of CD album sales and vinyl sales reaching a 20-year high at 1.3 million sales in 2014, as listeners adopt a "multi-channel" digital/physical approach to music consumption.
Pierre Priot's insight:

Streaming doubles in UK, and yet vinyl sales hit a 1.3M figure ; could streaming be actually boosting physical sales?

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Digital May Dominate Music Consumption, But Majority of Vinyl Buyers Are 35 and Under

Digital May Dominate Music Consumption, But Majority of Vinyl Buyers Are 35 and Under | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

At Amoeba Music, the hangar-size rock 'n' roll Mecca on Los Angeles' Sunset Boulevard, something ­surprising happened just before Christmas in 2013. After a few years of ­moderate growth, vinyl records started flying off the shelves in serious quantities for the first time since CDs took over in the late 1980s. Powered by Daft Punk's Random Access Memories and ­classic rock reissues, LP sales "exploded" that November, ­according to Amoeba GM Rik Sanchez. "It's just continued since -- it's substantial, a really heavy spike," he says. "Having a record in your hand is just way cooler than having a file in your iPod."

 

 

Pierre Priot's insight:

Profiling the vinyl enthusiasts

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With Downloads In Decline, Can iTunes Adapt?

With Downloads In Decline, Can iTunes Adapt? | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Apple's innovative iTunes music service is still the market leader in music downloads, but after more than a decade of growth, sales of music tracks on iTunes have been declining. Last year saw the largest drop in sales — 14 percent. The drop is attributed to the increasing popularity of streaming music services such as Spotify, Pandora and YouTube. These services give fans access to millions of tracks from any Internet-connected device for a monthly fee or in return for listening to commercials.
Pierre Priot's insight:

If the Internet eventually kills iTunes, I won't feel sorry for Apple!

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Music Production Evolution: The Rise Of Digital vs. The Vinyl Revival — MusicTank

Music Production Evolution: The Rise Of Digital vs. The Vinyl Revival — MusicTank | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

The unexpected sales success of music formatting last year has been labelled ‘The Vinyl Revival’.

Laura Creed, Superfi has delved into how and why the cult following for vinyl has resurfaced in this booming digital age.  Alongside this, she questions the popularity of digital and what this could mean for the music industry.

Below is an explanatory info graphic into the research findings.  Following the info graphic is further commentary to compliment the graphical representations of the study.

Pierre Priot's insight:

Don't call it a comeback. Vinyl's been here for years.

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Clae Wilson's curator insight, November 9, 2014 5:40 PM

The infographic in this article is really cool, as it gives a lot of great visual representations of how music sales have been shifting in past years. It shows that, while vinyl is still only a small sliver of total units sold, it's growing by leaps and bounds and has a very promising future.

Ryan Kowalkowski's curator insight, November 11, 2014 10:42 AM

There is a desire for music fans to own copies of their albums, but the debate over physical copies vs digital downloads if a finer line.

Christian Torres's curator insight, October 12, 2015 5:42 PM

Vinyls sale continue growing as the time pass, the Vinyl industry is back in the game again.

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Articles: Wax and Wane: The Tough Realities Behind Vinyl's Comeback

Articles: Wax and Wane: The Tough Realities Behind Vinyl's Comeback | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

Vinyl’s sharp rise began in 2008, when sales nearly doubled from the previous year’s 1 million to 1.9 million. The tallies have gone up each year since, and 2013’s 6.1 million is a 33 percent increase over 2012’s 4.6 million. (Those numbers are even larger when you account for releases that fall outside SoundScan’s reach.) The resurgent format’s market share is still far smaller than CDs, digital, and streaming—vinyl accounted for only 2 percent of all album sales last year, compared to 41 percent for digital and 57 percent for CDs—and no one expects it to regain dominance. But it’s more than a trend, and it’s not going away anytime soon. “Four years ago, maybe half our releases would get an LP option,” says James Cartwright, production manager at Merge Records. “Now every release we do has a vinyl format.”

 

 

Pierre Priot's insight:

In-depth pitchfork story on vinyl and the industry embracing its comeback

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Streaming Won't Save the Music Industry Until 2019, Study Finds... - Digital Music News

Streaming Won't Save the Music Industry Until 2019, Study Finds... - Digital Music News | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

Yes, streaming is reversed avalanching sales stories in countries like Sweden and Norway.  But its effect on the global market now appears limited, at best.

Pierre Priot's insight:

Like it or not: the industry will keep losing money as long as it will try to maintain both physical and digital markets.

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The Great Music Industry Power Shift

The Great Music Industry Power Shift | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

The long drawn out demise of recorded music revenue is well documented, as is the story of artists, labels and managers all trying to make sense of a world in which music sales can no longer be counted upon.  But the contraction of recorded revenue has occurred at the exact same time that the live music sector has undergone a renaissance.  The net effect, when coupled with publishing revenue holding its own and  the growth of albeit modest, merchandise revenue, is that the global music industry has largely held its own, contracting by just 3% between 2000 and 2013 (see figure).  Compare and contrast with the 41% decline in (retail) recorded music revenue over the same period.  Indeed it is the 60% growth in live revenue that has done most to offset the impact of declining music sales.

Pierre Priot's insight:

The music industry went through two revolutions over the past 14 years: downloading, then streaming. And yet, its global revenue has been stable. This is a not revenue crisis, its a metamorphosis. 

 

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Everything You Need to Know About 2013 Music Sales in One Infographic

Everything You Need to Know About 2013 Music Sales in One Infographic | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Streams climbed, CDs declined and Justin Timberlake wound up on top
Pierre Priot's insight:

Let's wrap 2013 with that infographic

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Tanner Samp's curator insight, January 19, 2014 7:15 PM

This article was a very informative and well put together sheet of various stats regarding music sales in 2013. I was surprised not that music streams were on the rise and sales continually dropping, but that while digital sales were down, the vinyl sales are climbing; we have finally come full circle last year with format sales.

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The real price of a music stream? It just keeps going down and down... - Music Business Worldwide

The real price of a music stream? It just keeps going down and down... - Music Business Worldwide | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Brace yourself.

The average amount of cash generated by an on-demand music stream in the US last year fell by 24%.

Each play across official premium and ad-funded platforms in 2015 – including Spotify, YouTube, TIDAL, Apple Music and Google Play Music – generated an average of $0.0051 for recorded music rightsholders.

MBW has calculated the figure by contrasting the volume of music streams in the US last year (as measured by Nielsen) with the amount of cash these plays generated, as published by the RIAA.

This figure has fallen dramatically over the past three years, since Nielsen began breaking out specific streaming consumption figures.
Pierre Priot's insight:
Here's why this business model is broken: the increase of streaming consumption doesn't provide revenue growth, but lowers the per stream revenue share.
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하석훈's curator insight, April 17, 3:42 AM

Isn't the streaming industry a new born area? I was amazed after seeing how fast the industry changes. I know that people are going to use streaming service for a long time, but revenue is falling down! I wonder how the streaming industry is going to be change and solve this problem.

 

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The Steady Decline Of The CD Buyer

The Steady Decline Of The CD Buyer | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

As much as we may be in the era of streaming, nearly half of recorded music revenue globally is still derived from physical sales, with the CD making up the vast majority of that. So, for all the understandable focus on how YouTube, Spotify, Soundcloud & co are shaping the future of the music business, the humble CD buyer remains crucial. Take away the $4.5 billion of physical music revenue generated in 2015 and most record labels of scale, majors included, would go belly up.

 

 

Pierre Priot's insight:

The CD buyer is getting old, and he's showing more interest in Nirvana's Unplugged latest re-issue than in any kickass new material you may put out.
No wonder back catalog sales are surpassing new releases

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clyde norvell's curator insight, February 9, 5:03 PM

Streaming music is the new way of getting and listening to music today,But the CD's market shouldn't not be over looked or under estimated. CD's are still a strong source of music sales and still has a strong market for them. Record companies and producers should continue to use them.

Larissa Teems's curator insight, February 10, 9:15 PM

Interesting to think about being able to "subscribe" to a record label instead of buy physical CDs from them. I've often wondered if it would be better if the big record labels did go "belly-up" and smaller labels and producers became more popular. I feel as though there would be more individuality and less influence from outsiders. 

Deandre Summlin's curator insight, February 11, 3:22 AM

How will you publish and expose your music?

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Consumer Spending On Digital Music Fell In 2014 [Yes You Read That Right] | MIDiA Research

Consumer Spending On Digital Music Fell In 2014 [Yes You Read That Right] | MIDiA Research | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Spending money on recorded music has become a lifestyle choice, an honesty box for the conscientious consumer. No one really needs to pay for music anymore.
Pierre Priot's insight:

This echoes with my "Carsharing With A Millennial" story  - http://bit.ly/1Rh06hO. No one really pays for music anymore. Thus B2C revenue fails to increase, actually decreases. The overall revenue growth is driven by B2B deals, most of those being ad based.

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하석훈's curator insight, April 17, 4:59 AM

Just like the radio is 'occupied' by advertisements, most of music industry seems going the same way. Aesthetic-wise, I think this phenomanom will ruin the artistry of music. I want music as music, not as a medium of the advertisements. Growth of B2B or

B2B2C form in music industry will facilitate this phenomenom.

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Marché de la musique enregistrée – les résultats du premier semestre 2015 - SNEP

Marché de la musique enregistrée – les résultats du premier semestre 2015 - SNEP | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Le streaming par abonnement, moteur de croissance de la musique enregistrée: C’est le modèle de l’abonnement qui porte cette dynamique avec une croissance de 66% alors que ceux du modèle financé par la publicité sont en légère baisse (-2%). Aujourd’hui, les abonnements représentent 76% des revenus du streaming, soit plus de la moitié des revenus numériques et 22% de l’ensemble du marché.La part des abonnements au sein du chiffre d’affaires a donc doublé en un an : 22% à fin juillet 2015 contre 12% à fin juillet 2014.

Les revenus issus de l’exploitation numérique représentent 43% du marché total (35% à fin juillet 2014)
Pierre Priot's insight:

French record industry syndicate SNEP discloses sales figures for 2015 first semester : physical sales keeps plunging down while streaming is taking a larger ratio of revenue, but yet fails to bring overall growth to the industry (down 6.2 %).

Streaming market went up 43% compared to last year figures.

 

France clearly fails to fully embrace the digital distribution model, with physical still making the biggest part of sales (57 %) ; this would be the main reason for the french industry poor revenue.

Additionally, download sales are also declining, bringing down the industry's most profitable digital music business model revenues.

 

The stake here is clearly the french music industry's ability to jump from one model to another - which was successfully achieved by Spain or Italy, and brought back revenue growth to those markets.

 

[full story and report in French]

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La industria discográfica europea y el streaming crecen en 2015

La industria discográfica europea y el streaming crecen en 2015 | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
Los primeros 6 meses de 2015 están arrojando datos muy positivos sobre los mercados discográficos europeos y el continuo auge del streaming como principal fuente de ingresos en consumo digital y en algunos tanto en digital como en físico. Repasamos los datos de algunos de los principales mercados europeos de los que ya tenemos datos del primer semestre.
Pierre Priot's insight:

Physical sales went up 22% in Italy. Now you know where to send those boxes of CDs

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Vinyl sales are still on the rise in 2015, fueling a revival that keeps pointing up

Vinyl sales are still on the rise in 2015, fueling a revival that keeps pointing up | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
It looks like the vinyl resurgence isn’t going away any time soon. In fact, for 2015, it may be getting stronger. Vinyl album sales between January and March of this year were 53 percent higher than the first three months of 2014, according to a recent Nielsen report.
Pierre Priot's insight:

US Vinyl sales hit 9.2 million units in 2015 - highest figure in 20 years!

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Latest ARIA Figures Reveal Streaming And Subscription Services Revenue Doubled In 2014 | Brag Magazine

Latest ARIA Figures Reveal Streaming And Subscription Services Revenue Doubled In 2014 | Brag Magazine | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

Subscription service income jumped twofold to $23 million. Revenue from streaming services was up 111% from 2013. Digital subscription and free ad-supported models now make up 10% of the total market. The message from music fans continues to be clear: give us an inexpensive alternative, and we won’t download illegally.

Pierre Priot's insight:

Streaming doubles revenue in Oz but fails to save the overall industry balance

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Mixmag | UK VINYL SALES AT HIGHEST SINCE 1996

Mixmag | UK VINYL SALES AT HIGHEST SINCE 1996 | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it
UK music shops have shifted one million records this year and the amount of wax units sold is expected to rise even further over Christmas.

It's the first time this amount of sales has been achieved in a year since 1996 and follows last month's estimation that the figure would be reached.

As a result of the wax resurgence, the Official Chart Company (OCC) is set to launch a weekly vinyl chart, revealing that the vinyl industry is now worth around £20 million, and sales are estimated to hit 1.2 million after the festive period.
Pierre Priot's insight:

Party like it's 1996

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Album Sales Hit A New Low

Album Sales Hit A New Low | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

This year, label executives finally conceded something there were reluctant to acknowledge last year: Streaming is cannibalizing digital sales.

Pierre Priot's insight:

It's either physical or digital, baby. 

Streaming or download.

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Sean Riggins's curator insight, September 13, 2014 11:43 AM

 This article comes from billboard.com, a company that tracks album sales. The article talks about the major decline in album sales and suggests that it is due to the growth of streaming services. The author states that "Streaming is cannibalizing digital sales" that not everyone agrees that streaming offsets the decline in digital sales. I included this article because it asks whether or not there will be enough revenue for artist as streaming services continue to grow.

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La venta de música en España crece un 6,2% en la primera mitad de 2014 | Industria Musical

La venta de música en España crece un 6,2% en la primera mitad de 2014 | Industria Musical | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

La industria musical española alcanza el ecuador del año con cifras alentadoras, según los datos de ventas correspondientes al primer semestre que hoy presenta Promusicae. Después de años de bajadas acumuladas en el volumen anual de ventas, los aficionados a la música en España han conseguido revertir esta tendencia durante la primera mitad de 2014. La inversión en música grabada, ya sea en soporte físico o digital, ascendió entre el 1 de enero y el 30 de junio a un total de 58,08 millones de euros, una cifra que mejora en un 6,2% la registrada en idéntico periodo de 2013 (54,68 millones). La consolidación del streaming y la aparición de nuevos discos de artistas tradicionalmente vendedores están detrás de este primer dato positivo desde 2001.

Pierre Priot's insight:

Music sales are going up 6.2% in Spain this semester. First sales raise since 2001. From our own experience, the Spanish audience is highly supported and has totally embraced the digital revolution.

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Is 2014 the year the album business fell apart?

Is 2014 the year the album business fell apart? | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

In recent years, albums from the likes of Adele and Emeli Sandé have hit 1m sales in the UK. But with even the biggest acts failing to match them this year, the blockbuster album looks increasingly like a relic of the past

Pierre Priot's insight:

Or maybe big acts fail to make big album sales because they fail to put out decent albums. Right now with per song purchase, a smash hit remains a one song success. People are now longer buying albums so they'll get that one song they like. 

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Record Store Day 2014: The spin is still in

Record Store Day 2014: The spin is still in | Kill The Record Industry | Scoop.it

Around the corner in Reckless Records, 22-year-old Joe is thumbing through records - some which have price tags of up to £50 - by Pixies and Sonic Youth. "These bands are still relevant now," he says. "They have a great sound. I prefer to buy on vinyl because it's much cooler."

Pierre Priot's insight:

Don't call it a comeback, Vinyl's been here for years!

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