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Resources

Here in this section we write about the best resources available to help you become informed about how to become a Merchant Mariner and how to become employable in the shortest possible time period with the least trouble. Buyer beware because every maritime school is trying to take your money and even have you go into debt and at the end of the day they don't even have the goods to get you hired after you complete their program. There are many sites out there that tell you how to get the documents, like this site, for example, http://merchantmarinejobs.org/ but at the end of the day that's not really what you're looking for, you don't need a site that explains how to get your documents, you need a resource that explains how to get a job. Our favorite book on the topic is a book specifically about how to become a sailor in the U.S. Merchant Marine fleet. It's a book that describes in detail how to enter the industry in a way that helps you to get help with getting your documents and training from within the industry itself and the author has a unique angle on how and why to enter the industry in a certain way. Again, you should be careful using the maritime schools as a source for information and be especially careful signing up for debt in exchange for maritime training. Sure, it's great to have your BST and your TWIC and your Z-card and your STCW but if you can't find an entry level job after that and you have no angle on how to get one, then you're up the creek without a paddle. That's why I recommend the book that directs you on how to understand the concepts of needing both experience and training, or that is to say, why training and certifications alone are not enough. My take is that it's best to pay your dues in a way that leads to guaranteed experience, because at the end of the day, as a merchant seaman in 2013, one is really not too employable until he has all his certifications up to and including either a Able Bodied Seaman for unlimited tonnage or a QMED (Qualified Member of Engine Department) for unlimited tonnage, and unfortunately there's only certain ways of approaching the challenge of getting qualified to that level, because some of the steps along the way involve sailing as an ordinary seaman, and there's almost no ordinary seaman jobs available on unlimited tonnage vessels, so it's important to understand every step along the way to reaching this level of certification and experience, and to have a solid strategy, plan and formula for how you are going to get there. Just as the ship you're on won't leave the harbor without a map, you shouldn't just go around buying training without a solid plan as to how you're going to arrive to be qualified at the level to where you can finally come and go from the job market at your leisure without worrying about whether or not you are going to be employable when you come back from vacation. You can count on me to point you to resources that will help you with this.

rkevjl32s's insight:

Here in this section we write about the best resources available to help you become informed about how to become a Merchant Mariner and how to become employable in the shortest possible time period with the least trouble. Buyer beware because every maritime school is trying to take your money and even have you go into debt and at the end of the day they don't even have the goods to get you hired after you complete their program. There are many sites out there that tell you how to get the documents, like this site, for example, http://merchantmarinejobs.org/ but at the end of the day that's not really what you're looking for, you don't need a site that explains how to get your documents, you need a resource that explains how to get a job. Our favorite book on the topic is a book specifically about how to become a sailor in the U.S. Merchant Marine fleet. It's a book that describes in detail how to enter the industry in a way that helps you to get help with getting your documents and training from within the industry itself and the author has a unique angle on how and why to enter the industry in a certain way. Again, you should be careful using the maritime schools as a source for information and be especially careful signing up for debt in exchange for maritime training. Sure, it's great to have your BST and your TWIC and your Z-card and your STCW but if you can't find an entry level job after that and you have no angle on how to get one, then you're up the creek without a paddle. That's why I recommend the book that directs you on how to understand the concepts of needing both experience and training, or that is to say, why training and certifications alone are not enough. My take is that it's best to pay your dues in a way that leads to guaranteed experience, because at the end of the day, as a merchant seaman in 2013, one is really not too employable until he has all his certifications up to and including either a Able Bodied Seaman for unlimited tonnage or a QMED (Qualified Member of Engine Department) for unlimited tonnage, and unfortunately there's only certain ways of approaching the challenge of getting qualified to that level, because some of the steps along the way involve sailing as an ordinary seaman, and there's almost no ordinary seaman jobs available on unlimited tonnage vessels, so it's important to understand every step along the way to reaching this level of certification and experience, and to have a solid strategy, plan and formula for how you are going to get there. Just as the ship you're on won't leave the harbor without a map, you shouldn't just go around buying training without a solid plan as to how you're going to arrive to be qualified at the level to where you can finally come and go from the job market at your leisure without worrying about whether or not you are going to be employable when you come back from vacation. You can count on me to point you to resources that will help you with this.

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What are the basic requirements for tugboat jobs in the U.S?

Are you looking for tug boat jobs as a mariner on a U.S flagged vessel? Well, it is important to be aware of the different credentials that are required of all merchant mariners in order to stand out before potential employers. Many people wishing to become sailors look for shortcuts due to the fact that there are many credentials that mariners have to keep up with in order remain skillful in their jobs. Unfortunately there are not shortcuts in the merchant marine job market. It is essential to have all your qualifications in order. This includes meeting the basic requirements that mariners ought to have in order to be considered for various job opportunities on maritime vessels. One of the fundamental documents that you must hold is a Merchant Mariner Document. This is basically a license that every sailor must have in order to be allowed to perform various roles on a ship, barge, tow boat or any other sailing vessel. Upon application, you can obtain your MMD from the Coast Guard. This document is often renewable upon expiring and mariners are expected to keep it up to date. In addition to the MMD, mariners also have to go through formal training at a maritime institution and obtain a couple of important certifications. The first one is known as a Basic Safety Training course. Holding this certification means that a mariner is capable of employing personal survival techniques, prevent and fight fire and perform basic first aid. This is a compulsory certification even for tugboat jobs. The other qualification that you must have when looking for a job on a tow boat is the Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping abbreviated as STCW. This credential demonstrates that a seafarer is conversant with standard maritime procedures and operations. It is important to emphasize that there is need for other specialized training in addition to the above three qualifications in order to elevate to better tugboat jobs and employment opportunities in other kinds of merchant fleets. Most employers will look for the aforementioned credentials before hiring an entry level mariner. If you have had prior experience sailing in the ocean or on inland water bodies such as lakes and rivers, it is worth mentioning this when applying for merchant marine jobs as this counts as ‘sea time’ as well. Another important consideration to make is where to get the best training. To learn about the best merchant marine schools and the secret to finding your first job or even how to elevate to a higher position, check out our Resources page. There you will find a ton of information regarding different kinds of jobs and work environments that will help you decide whether a seagoing job is the best way to make a living. Most importantly, learn how to make yourself marketable to potential employers, something that most novice mariners struggle with just after completing their training. With the right resources, you can make the best of your time and money that you spend trying to get a Merchant Marine job and by following a proven formula you can use the valuable information to begin a successful career a merchant marine sailor.

rkevjl32s's insight:

Are you looking for tug boat jobs as a mariner on a U.S flagged vessel? Well, it is important to be aware of the different credentials that are required of all merchant mariners in order to stand out before potential employers. Many people wishing to become sailors look for shortcuts due to the fact that there are many credentials that mariners have to keep up with in order remain skillful in their jobs. Unfortunately there are not shortcuts in the merchant marine job market. It is essential to have all your qualifications in order. This includes meeting the basic requirements that mariners ought to have in order to be considered for various job opportunities on maritime vessels. One of the fundamental documents that you must hold is a Merchant Mariner Document. This is basically a license that every sailor must have in order to be allowed to perform various roles on a ship, barge, tow boat or any other sailing vessel. Upon application, you can obtain your MMD from the Coast Guard. This document is often renewable upon expiring and mariners are expected to keep it up to date. In addition to the MMD, mariners also have to go through formal training at a maritime institution and obtain a couple of important certifications. The first one is known as a Basic Safety Training course. Holding this certification means that a mariner is capable of employing personal survival techniques, prevent and fight fire and perform basic first aid. This is a compulsory certification even for tugboat jobs. The other qualification that you must have when looking for a job on a tow boat is the Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping abbreviated as STCW. This credential demonstrates that a seafarer is conversant with standard maritime procedures and operations. It is important to emphasize that there is need for other specialized training in addition to the above three qualifications in order to elevate to better tugboat jobs and employment opportunities in other kinds of merchant fleets. Most employers will look for the aforementioned credentials before hiring an entry level mariner. If you have had prior experience sailing in the ocean or on inland water bodies such as lakes and rivers, it is worth mentioning this when applying for merchant marine jobs as this counts as ‘sea time’ as well. Another important consideration to make is where to get the best training. To learn about the best merchant marine schools and the secret to finding your first job or even how to elevate to a higher position, check out our Resources page. There you will find a ton of information regarding different kinds of jobs and work environments that will help you decide whether a seagoing job is the best way to make a living. Most importantly, learn how to make yourself marketable to potential employers, something that most novice mariners struggle with just after completing their training. With the right resources, you can make the best of your time and money that you spend trying to get a Merchant Marine job and by following a proven formula you can use the valuable information to begin a successful career a merchant marine sailor.

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What you need to know about U.S. Tugboat Jobs

Tugboat jobs in the U.S merchant marine fleet provide a good income generating opportunity for many job seeking mariners. Living and working on a towboat is not only adventurous but the work allows you to travel the world and visit new places upon docking at port. These few benefits are just some of the reasons why aspiring mariners make efforts to secure tugboat jobs. U.S merchant marine companies offer the best paying salaries hence they are the most sought after jobs. Finding employment can be competitive and most times mariners give up trying due to lack of sufficient information. The good thing about tugboat jobs is that people get the chance to build a career thanks to the different job positions that range from starting level to professional posts. The deck department makes up most of the crew members which consist of able bodied seamen and ordinary seamen. The former seafarers are regarded to be experienced while the latter only have basic level credentials. Mariners working in the steward department also perform cooking roles and they also have to be certified in order to fill these positions. In the engine department of a tugboat, wipers make up the lowest ranks and they perform roles such as cleaning equipment and maintaining machinery in the engine room. Wiper roles rarely exist aboard tugboats and normally the tugboat carries only a single engineer as the engine department. Connecting tug boats is a fairly challenging task since the work is labor intensive. Tug boats normally tow other vessels at the port and along inland river channels thus providing plenty of employment opportunities for entry level mariners. However, there are professional roles that tug boat jobs provide to experienced merchant mariners such as tankermen, engineers, pilots, mates and masters. In order to fill these positions, mariners need to go through the relevant training as well as demonstrate the relevant skills required to handle these jobs. Tugboat operators that continue to work aboard maritime vessels continue to gain seatime experience with time and those that pursue further training can move from being an ordinary deck hand to fulfilling more administrative and technical roles. One’s career progression ultimately lies with getting the right credentials in order to stay remain marketable. The U.S. Coast Guard provides the relevant license documents and regulates the requirements for all kinds of merchant marine jobs including tugboat employment opportunities. However, additional training with a recognized merchant marine academy is required in order to obtain more qualifications and increase your skill set. When looking for training institution courses, it is important to always seek those that are registered with the U.S. Coast Guard in order to have credentials that are recognized. Be careful before paying for training as many schools are happy to sell you training that will not lead to employment. As a merchant marine student trying to kick start a career at sea, keep in mind that your time spent learning how to become a sailor is vital to the outcome of your seafaring job hunt. Therefore, it is vital to make the most out of any opportunity that allows you to obtain training for merchant marine work, be it for tugboat jobs or otherwise. What are the working conditions for tugboat jobs? Working conditions on tugboats are generally tough for entry level mariners owing tot the fact that their line of work is filled with manual labor. Given that not all employers offer good equipment for mariners, there is an element of getting injured while connecting tow lines and even handling cargo equipment. This not withstanding, tugboat jobs are still quite fulfilling since they offer a definite career path for mariners. Proper training and additional experience allows mariners to be adept at their work and avoid occupational hazards associated with merchant marine jobs. Best way to find employment aboard a tugboat? Other than getting trained aboard boats and maritime vessels, it is important to know how to go about getting tug boat jobs and other merchant marine employment opportunities. The Internet provides a rich source of information about the U.S merchant marine job market along with potential employers, but be careful about choosing resources because many are expensive and misleading. Check out our resource page for the best resources to help you in your quest to become a merchant mariner. We keep the Resources Page up to date with the latest, greatest and most-affordable resources for those wanting to learn how to break into the merchant marine industry. Otherwise, finding the relevant information can be time consuming, especially if you don’t know where to start.

rkevjl32s's insight:

Tugboat jobs in the U.S merchant marine fleet provide a good income generating opportunity for many job seeking mariners. Living and working on a towboat is not only adventurous but the work allows you to travel the world and visit new places upon docking at port. These few benefits are just some of the reasons why aspiring mariners make efforts to secure tugboat jobs. U.S merchant marine companies offer the best paying salaries hence they are the most sought after jobs. Finding employment can be competitive and most times mariners give up trying due to lack of sufficient information. The good thing about tugboat jobs is that people get the chance to build a career thanks to the different job positions that range from starting level to professional posts. The deck department makes up most of the crew members which consist of able bodied seamen and ordinary seamen. The former seafarers are regarded to be experienced while the latter only have basic level credentials. Mariners working in the steward department also perform cooking roles and they also have to be certified in order to fill these positions. In the engine department of a tugboat, wipers make up the lowest ranks and they perform roles such as cleaning equipment and maintaining machinery in the engine room. Wiper roles rarely exist aboard tugboats and normally the tugboat carries only a single engineer as the engine department. Connecting tug boats is a fairly challenging task since the work is labor intensive. Tug boats normally tow other vessels at the port and along inland river channels thus providing plenty of employment opportunities for entry level mariners. However, there are professional roles that tug boat jobs provide to experienced merchant mariners such as tankermen, engineers, pilots, mates and masters. In order to fill these positions, mariners need to go through the relevant training as well as demonstrate the relevant skills required to handle these jobs. Tugboat operators that continue to work aboard maritime vessels continue to gain seatime experience with time and those that pursue further training can move from being an ordinary deck hand to fulfilling more administrative and technical roles. One’s career progression ultimately lies with getting the right credentials in order to stay remain marketable. The U.S. Coast Guard provides the relevant license documents and regulates the requirements for all kinds of merchant marine jobs including tugboat employment opportunities. However, additional training with a recognized merchant marine academy is required in order to obtain more qualifications and increase your skill set. When looking for training institution courses, it is important to always seek those that are registered with the U.S. Coast Guard in order to have credentials that are recognized. Be careful before paying for training as many schools are happy to sell you training that will not lead to employment. As a merchant marine student trying to kick start a career at sea, keep in mind that your time spent learning how to become a sailor is vital to the outcome of your seafaring job hunt. Therefore, it is vital to make the most out of any opportunity that allows you to obtain training for merchant marine work, be it for tugboat jobs or otherwise. What are the working conditions for tugboat jobs? Working conditions on tugboats are generally tough for entry level mariners owing tot the fact that their line of work is filled with manual labor. Given that not all employers offer good equipment for mariners, there is an element of getting injured while connecting tow lines and even handling cargo equipment. This not withstanding, tugboat jobs are still quite fulfilling since they offer a definite career path for mariners. Proper training and additional experience allows mariners to be adept at their work and avoid occupational hazards associated with merchant marine jobs. Best way to find employment aboard a tugboat? Other than getting trained aboard boats and maritime vessels, it is important to know how to go about getting tug boat jobs and other merchant marine employment opportunities. The Internet provides a rich source of information about the U.S merchant marine job market along with potential employers, but be careful about choosing resources because many are expensive and misleading. Check out our resource page for the best resources to help you in your quest to become a merchant mariner. We keep the Resources Page up to date with the latest, greatest and most-affordable resources for those wanting to learn how to break into the merchant marine industry. Otherwise, finding the relevant information can be time consuming, especially if you don’t know where to start.

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Resources

Here in this section we write about the best resources available to help you become informed about how to become a Merchant Mariner and how to become employable in the shortest possible time period with the least trouble. Buyer beware because every maritime school is trying to take your money and even have you go into debt and at the end of the day they don't even have the goods to get you hired after you complete their program. There are many sites out there that tell you how to get the documents, like this site, for example, http://merchantmarinejobs.org/ but at the end of the day that's not really what you're looking for, you don't need a site that explains how to get your documents, you need a resource that explains how to get a job. Our favorite book on the topic is a book specifically about how to become a sailor in the U.S. Merchant Marine fleet. It's a book that describes in detail how to enter the industry in a way that helps you to get help with getting your documents and training from within the industry itself and the author has a unique angle on how and why to enter the industry in a certain way. Again, you should be careful using the maritime schools as a source for information and be especially careful signing up for debt in exchange for maritime training. Sure, it's great to have your BST and your TWIC and your Z-card and your STCW but if you can't find an entry level job after that and you have no angle on how to get one, then you're up the creek without a paddle. That's why I recommend the book that directs you on how to understand the concepts of needing both experience and training, or that is to say, why training and certifications alone are not enough. My take is that it's best to pay your dues in a way that leads to guaranteed experience, because at the end of the day, as a merchant seaman in 2013, one is really not too employable until he has all his certifications up to and including either a Able Bodied Seaman for unlimited tonnage or a QMED (Qualified Member of Engine Department) for unlimited tonnage, and unfortunately there's only certain ways of approaching the challenge of getting qualified to that level, because some of the steps along the way involve sailing as an ordinary seaman, and there's almost no ordinary seaman jobs available on unlimited tonnage vessels, so it's important to understand every step along the way to reaching this level of certification and experience, and to have a solid strategy, plan and formula for how you are going to get there. Just as the ship you're on won't leave the harbor without a map, you shouldn't just go around buying training without a solid plan as to how you're going to arrive to be qualified at the level to where you can finally come and go from the job market at your leisure without worrying about whether or not you are going to be employable when you come back from vacation. You can count on me to point you to resources that will help you with this.

rkevjl32s's insight:

Here in this section we write about the best resources available to help you become informed about how to become a Merchant Mariner and how to become employable in the shortest possible time period with the least trouble. Buyer beware because every maritime school is trying to take your money and even have you go into debt and at the end of the day they don't even have the goods to get you hired after you complete their program. There are many sites out there that tell you how to get the documents, like this site, for example, http://merchantmarinejobs.org/ but at the end of the day that's not really what you're looking for, you don't need a site that explains how to get your documents, you need a resource that explains how to get a job. Our favorite book on the topic is a book specifically about how to become a sailor in the U.S. Merchant Marine fleet. It's a book that describes in detail how to enter the industry in a way that helps you to get help with getting your documents and training from within the industry itself and the author has a unique angle on how and why to enter the industry in a certain way. Again, you should be careful using the maritime schools as a source for information and be especially careful signing up for debt in exchange for maritime training. Sure, it's great to have your BST and your TWIC and your Z-card and your STCW but if you can't find an entry level job after that and you have no angle on how to get one, then you're up the creek without a paddle. That's why I recommend the book that directs you on how to understand the concepts of needing both experience and training, or that is to say, why training and certifications alone are not enough. My take is that it's best to pay your dues in a way that leads to guaranteed experience, because at the end of the day, as a merchant seaman in 2013, one is really not too employable until he has all his certifications up to and including either a Able Bodied Seaman for unlimited tonnage or a QMED (Qualified Member of Engine Department) for unlimited tonnage, and unfortunately there's only certain ways of approaching the challenge of getting qualified to that level, because some of the steps along the way involve sailing as an ordinary seaman, and there's almost no ordinary seaman jobs available on unlimited tonnage vessels, so it's important to understand every step along the way to reaching this level of certification and experience, and to have a solid strategy, plan and formula for how you are going to get there. Just as the ship you're on won't leave the harbor without a map, you shouldn't just go around buying training without a solid plan as to how you're going to arrive to be qualified at the level to where you can finally come and go from the job market at your leisure without worrying about whether or not you are going to be employable when you come back from vacation. You can count on me to point you to resources that will help you with this.

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Tips for finding Tugboat Jobs in the U.S Merchant Marine

The U.S merchant marine industry operates plenty of water craft vessels that engage in international trade. Tugboat jobs are among the many different kinds of employment opportunities that exist in this field. Majority of tug boat operators work inland on the Great Lakes and river systems although a small number of maritime towing vessels also run along the coastal ocean routes. If you are seeking your first job as a novice mariner, entry level jobs such as engineers, deckhands and ordinary seamen are some of the roles that can be filled by competent job seeking individuals. Prior to searching a job as a tug boat worker, it is important to consider some of the operations that have to be fulfilled in this line of work. Typically, tow boats offer several kinds of services such as hauling marine equipment, docking/undocking naval vessels and shifting floating equipment within the marina. As a result of this, tug boat operators need to be well versed with handling different kinds of vessels. To be able to achieve this level of competence, obtaining the required training is of utmost importance. The U.S coast guard department issues applicants with licenses to work aboard ships. This certification is known as the Merchant Mariner Document which is issued under the professional maritime guidelines of the Coast Guard and is a mandatory document required for employment on any kind of seafaring jobs including tugboat jobs. Just like any other maritime designations, tug boat roles also require users to have the relevant certifications as proof of having undergone through the required training that enables one to be qualified for certain roles. Before you enroll in any maritime training institutions make sure check out the resources we recommend on how to become a seafarer on a U.S flagged vessel. Learn the inside tips on how to secure tugboat jobs and insight that will help you elevate your skills to grater heights and positions. You have to be careful when you're purchasing training in the marine industry because often students use the school as the source of information on the validity and applicability of the training. Usually the training is indeed applicable but another question is: Can you actually get a job after completing the training, or do you need more training, or worse yet, experience before you can even be eligible for more training. Be a wise consumer and don't buy training if it won't get you hired. There's ways to get hired in the Maritime industry and more training is not always the way. Sure it helps to have your TWIC card, your Z-card and your BST, your tankerman certification, etc. but the main thing is can you get somebody paying you to build seatime once you complete your training. Good luck in your quest to become a Merchant Mariner and work on tugboats. I did it and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It's a dangerous line of work but it pays well and it has it's benefits too like lots of vacation time and if you're single you can live with virtually no expenses then travel on your time off, which is a cool trick if you ask me.

rkevjl32s's insight:

The U.S merchant marine industry operates plenty of water craft vessels that engage in international trade. Tugboat jobs are among the many different kinds of employment opportunities that exist in this field. Majority of tug boat operators work inland on the Great Lakes and river systems although a small number of maritime towing vessels also run along the coastal ocean routes. If you are seeking your first job as a novice mariner, entry level jobs such as engineers, deckhands and ordinary seamen are some of the roles that can be filled by competent job seeking individuals. Prior to searching a job as a tug boat worker, it is important to consider some of the operations that have to be fulfilled in this line of work. Typically, tow boats offer several kinds of services such as hauling marine equipment, docking/undocking naval vessels and shifting floating equipment within the marina. As a result of this, tug boat operators need to be well versed with handling different kinds of vessels. To be able to achieve this level of competence, obtaining the required training is of utmost importance. The U.S coast guard department issues applicants with licenses to work aboard ships. This certification is known as the Merchant Mariner Document which is issued under the professional maritime guidelines of the Coast Guard and is a mandatory document required for employment on any kind of seafaring jobs including tugboat jobs. Just like any other maritime designations, tug boat roles also require users to have the relevant certifications as proof of having undergone through the required training that enables one to be qualified for certain roles. Before you enroll in any maritime training institutions make sure check out the resources we recommend on how to become a seafarer on a U.S flagged vessel. Learn the inside tips on how to secure tugboat jobs and insight that will help you elevate your skills to grater heights and positions. You have to be careful when you're purchasing training in the marine industry because often students use the school as the source of information on the validity and applicability of the training. Usually the training is indeed applicable but another question is: Can you actually get a job after completing the training, or do you need more training, or worse yet, experience before you can even be eligible for more training. Be a wise consumer and don't buy training if it won't get you hired. There's ways to get hired in the Maritime industry and more training is not always the way. Sure it helps to have your TWIC card, your Z-card and your BST, your tankerman certification, etc. but the main thing is can you get somebody paying you to build seatime once you complete your training. Good luck in your quest to become a Merchant Mariner and work on tugboats. I did it and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It's a dangerous line of work but it pays well and it has it's benefits too like lots of vacation time and if you're single you can live with virtually no expenses then travel on your time off, which is a cool trick if you ask me.

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