kennisbasis aardrijkskunde
55 views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
onto kennisbasis aardrijkskunde
Scoop.it!

Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

Via Seth Dixon
Rianne Tolsma's insight:

add your insight...

more...
Helen Rowling's curator insight, June 15, 2014 7:05 PM

Great shocking reality of a hidden world...

 

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 2014 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 2014 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New Urbanism

"New Urbanism is a planning and development approach based on the principles of how cities and towns had been built for the last several centuries: walkable blocks and streets, housing and shopping in close proximity, and accessible public spaces. In other words: New Urbanism focuses on human-scaled urban design."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 15, 8:58 AM

As the 2017 APHG exam has ended, some people have asked for more resources on new urbanism.  Here is information from New Urbanism (dot org) the Congress on New Urbanism for teachers and students that are reassessing the Free Response Questions. 

 

Tagsplace, neighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism, scale

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Syria's war: Who is fighting and why [Updated]

"After four-plus years of fighting, Syria's war has killed at least hundreds of thousands of people and displaced millions. And, though it started as a civil war, it's become much more than that. It's a proxy war that has divided much of the Middle East, and has drawn in both Russia and the United States. To understand how Syria got to this place, it helps to start at the beginning and watch it unfold."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jonathan Gainey's curator insight, April 13, 12:53 PM
This video is related to chapter seven "Ethnicities" because Syria's war is composed of many countries of different ethnicities fighting for different people. In my opinion, this video is very informal and helped me to understand what is actually going on in Syria.
Reagan Stiles's curator insight, April 16, 8:49 PM
This article relates to human geography because we have been discussing what causes tension and problems between ethnicities. My opinion on the video is that we need to make more statements to show we are involved in the war and that we can have justice.
Kaleigh Thompson's curator insight, April 21, 1:27 PM
This article is related to Human Geography because in class we have been discussing what causes problems between ethnic groups. In my opinion the video is that we should do more, makes more statements and show that we are involved in the war and that we also can have justice like everyone else 
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Is Greenland an Island but Australia a Continent?

Why Is Greenland an Island but Australia a Continent? | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Why is Australia a continent and Greenland is not? Even though Australia is the smallest of the accepted continents, Australia is still more than 3.5 times larger than Greenland. There has to be a line in the sand between small continent and the world's largest island and traditionally that line exists between Australia and Greenland. Geologically, Australia lies on its own major tectonic plate while Greenland is part of the North American plate."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 8, 4:19 PM

I'm sharing this link for two reasons. 

  1. To help resolve the confusion as to why Greenland the world's largest island but Australia gets to be the smallest continent. The main reason is all about the continental shelf and not the coastline--Greenland is connected to North America to the continental shelf while Australia has its own shelf. 
  2. I know many of you have been fans of Matt Rosenberg's online resources over the years.  If you have lost track of him, he is continuing to share geographic information on ThoughtCo

 

Tags: GreenlandAustralia, geology.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 11:58 AM
unit 1
Anne Tumak's curator insight, March 10, 4:28 AM

I'm sharing this link for two reasons. 

  1. To help resolve the confusion as to why Greenland the world's largest island but Australia gets to be the smallest continent. The main reason is all about the continental shelf and not the coastline--Greenland is connected to North America to the continental shelf while Australia has its own shelf. 
  2. I know many of you have been fans of Matt Rosenberg's online resources over the years.  If you have lost track of him, he is continuing to share geographic information on ThoughtCo

 

Tags: GreenlandAustralia, geology.

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population, Sustainability, and Malthus

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th century, but for some reason, he keeps coming up when we talk about population. In 1800, the human population of the Earth passed 1 billion, and Thomas Malthus posited that growth had hit its ceiling, and the population would level off and stop growing. He was totally right. Just kidding, he was totally wrong! There are like 7 billion people on the planet now! John will teach a little about how Malthus made his calculations, and explain how Malthus came up with the wrong answer. As is often the case, it has to do with making projections based on faulty assumptions. Man, people do that a lot.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 4:15 PM

This is a succinct summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Combatting FGM

"The United Nations Development Programme started to advocate against the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM) back in 2003 when it was taboo even to speak about it. In 2008, the practice was banned. The government of Egypt has institutionalized the adoption of FGM abandonment; while prevalence rates remain high (namely among older women), the response of younger girls and mothers of new generations to FGM abandonment campaigns is much higher."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 7, 3:41 PM

This is always a difficult topic for me to talk about in my college classes since it is such a sensitive topic.  However, because it touches on so many taboo topics, that is the very reason that that practice of FGM has continued in many African and Middle Eastern countries.  See the map embedded in this article to know which countries have the highest prevalency rates.  Some are concerned that through relocation diffusion, international migrants can bring this practice to areas such as Europe. Western efforts to eradicate FGM are usually ineffective and sometimes backfire (the author in the linked articles feels that the term mutilation, while accurate, is counterproductive).

 

Tags: culture, gender, media

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants

WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"The ESRI storymap on climate refugees does a phenomenal job sampling locations in the world that experience migration effects as a result of climate change. Attached is a guided worksheet that accompanies the ESRI Climate Migrant Storymap."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 10:04 AM

This StoryMap shows some key regions where migrants are fleeing some of the negative impacts of climate change and one APHG teacher has created a fabulous worksheet to guide students through this great resource.   

 

TagsAPHG, climate changemigrationrefugees, environment, coastalmappingESRIStoryMap, political ecology.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 26, 2:51 PM
Geographic Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships, Geographic Perspective
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Israeli-Palestinian Conflict updates, 2016

Israeli-Palestinian Conflict updates, 2016 | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one that powerfully divides the international community.  Of those living within the state of Israel, Pew Research data shows that they are often deeply divided based on religious affiliation. Not surprisingly, those divisions extend into how they view the peace process, West Bank settlements and U.S. support.  Although the conflict is portrayed as a battle between religious groups, it can be more fairly assessed as two nationalistic groups competing for land.  Broadly speaking, the Muslim world has sided with the Palestinians, and the U.S. and its NATO allies have defended Israel.   In the United Nation’s Security Council, the United States’ veto power has been use to strike down resolutions that would condemn Israeli settlement in the militarily occupied lands of the West Bank.  The 2016 UN resolution that passed 14-0 (with only the U.S. abstaining) says that Israel’s settlements on Palestinian territory occupied since 1967, including East Jerusalem, have “no legal validity” and demands a halt to “all Israeli settlement activities,” saying this “is essential for salvaging the two-state solution.”

 

These settlements are considered by most of the international community to be illegal, and the UN has condemned them, but since the U.S. has always vetoed this, Israel has never been formally reprimanded.  Earlier this week, the U.S. abstained from the vote, and the many see the U.S. position as hypocritical, (Secretary of State John Kerry strongly defended the position).

 

Some highly partisan supporters of Israel do not see Israel’s actions as the problem, primarily because Israel’s neighbors have traditionally not recognized its right to exist, and attacked it many times.  Therefore, they see Israel’s actions as necessary for the security of Israel, and do not see Israel’s settlements in the West Bank as illegal since Palestine isn’t a state that was ever legally accepted. 

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, borders, political, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 9, 2:14 AM
Israeli-Palestinian Conflict updates, 2016
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
ROCAFORT's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:14 AM
Human Population Through Time
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, December 6, 2016 2:23 PM
Pour la DNL seconde
 
Jordyn Reeves's curator insight, January 11, 3:44 PM
This relates to our topic by showing that our population is growing rapidly. By the time 2025 there will be more than 11 billion people on the Earth. But we have enough resources to last us.
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New Zealand quake lifted seabed by 2m

New Zealand quake lifted seabed by 2m | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
The 7.8 magnitude earthquake that hit New Zealand’s South Island lifted up the seabed by two metres, pushing it above the ocean’s surface.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 18, 2016 10:00 AM

Plates on the Earth's crust typically move forward at very slowly (about the same speed as the fingernail growth).  While that is the usual, plates snag along the edges and pressure can build over the years, only to lead to explosive, quick changes like happened recently in New Zealand.  This complex series of tremors has people disconnected as much of the physical infrastructure has be damaged

 

Tags: New Zealandphysical, tectonicstransportation, geology, geomorphology.

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What's the tallest mountain on Earth?

What's the tallest mountain on Earth? | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Mount Everest is usually said to be the highest mountain on Earth. Reaching 29,035 feet at its summit, Everest is indeed the highest point above global mean sea level—the average level for the ocean surface from which elevations are measured. But the summit of Mt. Everest is not the farthest point from Earth’s center.

Earth is not a perfect sphere, but is a bit thicker at the Equator due to the centrifugal force created by the planet’s constant rotation. Because of this, the highest point above Earth’s center is the peak of Ecuador’s Mount Chimborazo, located just one degree south of the Equator where Earth’s bulge is greatest. The summit of Chimborazo is 20,564 feet above sea level. However, due to the Earth’s bulge, the summit of Chimborazo is over 6,560 feet farther from the center of the Earth than Everest’s peak. That makes Chimborazo the closest point on Earth to the stars.  

You may be surprised to learn that Everest is not the tallest mountain on Earth, either. That honor belongs to Mauna Kea, a volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Mauna Kea originates deep beneath the Pacific Ocean, and rises more than 32,800 feet from base to peak."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 25, 2016 6:42 PM

I've tried to answer this question without any visual aids and there is always at least one confused look in the class.  This infographic is the most straightforward way to give the 'long' answer to a seemingly simple question, "what is the tallest mountain on Earth?"  It all depends on how you measure it and what your reference point is.   

 

Tags: physicalEcuador, Nepal.

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Without trying to defend or absolve U.S. policy, then, it is worth stepping back to ask what shared historical experiences might have left these four countries — Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen — particularly at risk of violent collapse. The following maps help highlight how, at various points over the past century, historical circumstances conspired, in an often self-reinforcing way, to bolster the stability of some states in the region while undermining that of others."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 2016 4:31 PM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, October 22, 2016 9:30 AM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

This is where your smartphone battery begins

This is where your smartphone battery begins | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Workers, including children, labor in harsh and dangerous conditions to meet the world’s soaring demand for cobalt, a mineral essential to powering electric vehicles, laptops, and smartphones, according to an investigation by The Washington Post.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 2, 2016 6:47 PM

Links between the products we use and other people, places and environments - and the consequences of production. 

Gayle Kakac's curator insight, October 3, 2016 10:31 AM
I'm afraid this is a very sad aspect of our technology.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 4, 2016 2:29 AM
This is where your smartphone battery begins
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why China and India face a marriage crisis

"What has lead to this marriage squeeze?  First, millions women have gone 'missing'. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women."

 

Tags: gender, China, India, culture, population.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Dustin Fowler's curator insight, September 17, 2016 7:23 PM
Great food for thought!
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why geography matters for students now more than ever

Why geography matters for students now more than ever | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Students need to know human geography; they need to understand the relationships that exist between cultures.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 5, 11:30 AM

This is more example of me preaching to the choir, but I hope that this will arm you with resources to use in discussions with administrators and colleagues in the fight against geographic ignorance.  This is a great article to put into my new tag of article that discuss why geography matters.   

 

Tagseducation, K12geography education, geography matters.

Brandon Fourie's curator insight, May 23, 5:58 AM
Very interesting read! 
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Primary School Geography (HSIE)
Scoop.it!

"Thinking like a Geographer" (OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO)

WARNING! This video contains explicit geographical scenes that may offend the non-worldy-wise.

Via Maree Whiteley, Hoolee Nan
more...
Maree Whiteley's curator insight, March 27, 2013 10:04 AM

Very entertaining viewing...enjoy!

Sue Bicknell's curator insight, August 29, 2013 6:09 AM

a boost to subject choices in upper school

 

Hoolee Nan's curator insight, March 30, 2014 5:24 PM

Just for fun! It will be engaging video for children to begin to "think like a geographer". A good attention grabber and captivate the children's mind into the world of geography! The video gives examples of how in geography we label landmarks and events in our environment with unique terms. Overall, gives the perspective we are to hold when studying geography. 

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How did Zimbabwe get so poor?

President Mugabe's economic mismanagement of Zimbabwe has brought the country poverty and malnutrition. After 36 years in charge, he's looking to extend his rule by 5 more years.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 22, 8:40 PM

Poverty at the national level is usually not a function of limited resources, but more often it is a sign of weak institutions.  This is but one example of how governmental mismanagement can put a country's developmental progress back decades.

 

Tags: Africa, Zimbabwe, development, economic, political.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 11:56 AM
unit 4 and  unit 6,  democratization?
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 9, 11:58 AM
unit 4 and unit 6 #democratization?
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What are El Niño and La Niña?

What are El Niño and La Niña? | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"El Niño and La Niña are complex weather patterns resulting from variations in ocean temperatures in the Equatorial Pacific--officially known as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle. These deviations from normal surface temperatures can have large-scale impacts not only on ocean processes, but also on global weather and climate."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 8, 3:41 PM

This short video from NOAA is an excellent summary that explains the ENSO cycle.  The video has a particular emphasis on how changing patterns in the Pacific Ocean currents can impact weather patterns in various regions of the United States.  

 

Tagsphysical, weather and climateregions, USA.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, February 24, 2:31 AM
What are El Niño and La Niña?
Loreto Vargas's curator insight, February 24, 12:45 PM
It’s a complicated phenomenon but El Niño is not the same as La Niña... Read the article.
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants

WORKSHEETS: Climate Migrants | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"The ESRI storymap on climate refugees does a phenomenal job sampling locations in the world that experience migration effects as a result of climate change. Attached is a guided worksheet that accompanies the ESRI Climate Migrant Storymap."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 10:04 AM

This StoryMap shows some key regions where migrants are fleeing some of the negative impacts of climate change and one APHG teacher has created a fabulous worksheet to guide students through this great resource.   

 

TagsAPHG, climate changemigrationrefugees, environment, coastalmappingESRIStoryMap, political ecology.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, January 26, 2:51 PM
Geographic Concepts: Spatial Significance, Patterns and Trends, Interrelationships, Geographic Perspective
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Climate Migrants

Climate Migrants | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Climate change has already displaced tens of thousands of people. If it continues unabated, it could lead to one of the largest mass human migrations in history.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 18, 10:21 AM

This StoryMap shows some key regions where migrants are fleeing some of the negative impacts of climate change, a trend that appears very likely to increase in the future.  It is also an excellent example of the ESRI's new Cascade template for creating a web app. 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmappingESRIStoryMap, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Video: Step Into a Refugee Camp

Video: Step Into a Refugee Camp | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
The Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan is one of the largest Syrian camps in the world. In the fall, we visited the camp live with our audience. Here’s what we heard from the refugees and from you.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 3, 8:35 AM

If you want to humanize the massive refugee crisis, and have lives and stories to connect to statistics, this 11 minute video shows what life is like in a refugee camp, and goes into the hopes, dreams, and life stories of the refugees. 

 

TagsMiddleEast, Jordan, Syria, political, refugees.

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Spice Trade's Legacy

The Spice Trade's Legacy | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"In its day, the spice trade was the world’s biggest industry. It established and destroyed empires and helped the Europeans (who were looking for alternate routes to the east) map the globe through their discovery of new continents. What was once tightly controlled by the Arabs for centuries was now available throughout Europe with the establishment of the Ocean Spice Trade route connecting Europe directly to South Asia (India) and South East Asia."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 17, 2016 2:37 PM

The spice trade changed how we eat forever but it did so much more.  The fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Empire cut off Europe from the vital trade routes to the east and access to the most prized commodities of the day.  What drove European exploration to get around Africa and to cross the Atlantic?  It was to reshape their situation location relative to the economic networks that shaped the emerging global economy.  In essence, the spice trade reshaped the fortunes and trajectories of several major world regions.   

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, food productiondiffusionglobalization, agriculture, economicindustry, economic, historical, regions.

Liz Caughlin's curator insight, November 21, 2016 7:45 PM
Spice trade and connections with diffusion of Islam
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Environmental Cost of Consumption

The Environmental Cost of Consumption | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Environmental artist J Henry Fair captures the beauty and destruction of industrial sites to illustrate the hidden impacts of the things we buy – the polluted air, destroyed habitats and the invisible carbon heating the planet

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 2016 6:28 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impacts of human use of resources. The beautiful images illustrate the extreme impact on the environment.
Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 2016 6:30 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impact of human activity on environments.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 16, 2016 5:37 PM

Production and consumption - interconnections and consequences 

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography

U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Your kid has no idea where Saudi Arabia – or maybe even South Carolina – is. Here's why.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 22, 2016 2:40 PM

The U.S. government report on 8th grade geography is not a 'pick-me-up' but a sobering reminder of the task that lays before us.  This article quotes a few alliance coordinators on the current situation and how to change it. 

 

TagseducationK12geography education.

Heather Durden's curator insight, January 10, 5:34 PM

The article talks about how in the US there are more students who are not well in geography. Moreover at least only 48% are in the basic geography portion while 25% are in the low basic, 24% are proficient, and 3% are professional.In 1994, there was 4% in the efficient level as well. this relates to geography because it tells you how the United states is not so advanced with learning geography. this article represents how the economy is today teachers who do social studies do not really talk as much when it comes to geography. therefore, it is proven to be true  according to figure 3. all in all, the article does give good information but could have added a little more.

Kassie Geiger's curator insight, January 10, 9:35 PM

This relates to World Culture Geography because this article is about how past, present, and upcoming generations are bad at geography. I like this particular article because the author talks about a lack of teacher preparation and professional development in the subject, poor quality of geography instructional materials, and limited use of geographic technology in the classroom. I'd like to address a few more reasons, due to technological advances and accessibility, many people Google things they don't know or understand. Yes, this has its advantages but as a young adult in this ever-changing world, a majority of the population is glued to electronic devices.  Furthermore, students only learn things or study to pass a test or class, this is sometimes referred to as short-term learning. This happens quite often especially in high school students like myself and fellow peers. This can be caused by many things, dead lines, busy schedules, etc. Plus many schools don't require a geography course.

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Country Cluster Quiz

Country Cluster Quiz | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"No borders. No landmarks. No context. How many countries will you be able to recognize? Here’s how this works. I give you a the outline of several countries together, without borders or any other context, and you guess which countries you’re looking at."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 2016 4:26 PM

This is not the most difficult geography quiz (as advertised on Buzzfeed), but it does take some time since all the countries in a given cluster aren't all immediately obvious.  The fact that it is multiple choice certainly simplifies the this quiz.

 

Tagsmapping, trivia, funborders.

Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

'Leftover Women' in China

"Chinese women face immense pressure to get married before they turn 27. In many Chinese cities, so called marriage markets are a common sight, where parents go to post and match personal ads. A number of brave Chinese women have finally stood up to speak their mind against society’s labels and their parents' pressures."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 20, 2016 2:07 PM

This emotional ad about 'leftover women' in China has received a lot of traffic and is now invigorating a national conversation about marriage customs, gendered norms, and cultural expectations.  What isn't as explicit in the video is how demographic policies and cultural preferences for boys has created the situation that puts added pressure on single women

 

Questions to Ponder: How is this (at least partially) a lingering impact of the One Child Policy?  What traits of traditional Chinese culture led to this current situation?   

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, culture, population.