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Human Population Through Time

It took 200,000 years for our human population to reach 1 billion—and only 200 years to reach 7 billion. But growth has begun slowing, as women have fewer babies on average. When will our global population peak? And how can we minimize our impact on Earth’s resources, even as we approach 11 billion?

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Lilydale High School's curator insight, December 5, 4:59 PM
How Earth's population had grown.
ROCAFORT's curator insight, Today, 2:14 AM
Human Population Through Time
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, Today, 2:23 PM
Pour la DNL seconde
 
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New Zealand quake lifted seabed by 2m

New Zealand quake lifted seabed by 2m | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
The 7.8 magnitude earthquake that hit New Zealand’s South Island lifted up the seabed by two metres, pushing it above the ocean’s surface.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 18, 10:00 AM

Plates on the Earth's crust typically move forward at very slowly (about the same speed as the fingernail growth).  While that is the usual, plates snag along the edges and pressure can build over the years, only to lead to explosive, quick changes like happened recently in New Zealand.  This complex series of tremors has people disconnected as much of the physical infrastructure has be damaged

 

Tags: New Zealandphysical, tectonicstransportation, geology, geomorphology.

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What's the tallest mountain on Earth?

What's the tallest mountain on Earth? | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Mount Everest is usually said to be the highest mountain on Earth. Reaching 29,035 feet at its summit, Everest is indeed the highest point above global mean sea level—the average level for the ocean surface from which elevations are measured. But the summit of Mt. Everest is not the farthest point from Earth’s center.

Earth is not a perfect sphere, but is a bit thicker at the Equator due to the centrifugal force created by the planet’s constant rotation. Because of this, the highest point above Earth’s center is the peak of Ecuador’s Mount Chimborazo, located just one degree south of the Equator where Earth’s bulge is greatest. The summit of Chimborazo is 20,564 feet above sea level. However, due to the Earth’s bulge, the summit of Chimborazo is over 6,560 feet farther from the center of the Earth than Everest’s peak. That makes Chimborazo the closest point on Earth to the stars.  

You may be surprised to learn that Everest is not the tallest mountain on Earth, either. That honor belongs to Mauna Kea, a volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Mauna Kea originates deep beneath the Pacific Ocean, and rises more than 32,800 feet from base to peak."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 25, 6:42 PM

I've tried to answer this question without any visual aids and there is always at least one confused look in the class.  This infographic is the most straightforward way to give the 'long' answer to a seemingly simple question, "what is the tallest mountain on Earth?"  It all depends on how you measure it and what your reference point is.   

 

Tags: physicalEcuador, Nepal.

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Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East

Four maps that explain the chaos of the Middle East | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Without trying to defend or absolve U.S. policy, then, it is worth stepping back to ask what shared historical experiences might have left these four countries — Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen — particularly at risk of violent collapse. The following maps help highlight how, at various points over the past century, historical circumstances conspired, in an often self-reinforcing way, to bolster the stability of some states in the region while undermining that of others."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 4:31 PM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, October 22, 9:30 AM

These maps are not cartographically inspiring, but the it's the historical and political insight that makes them valuable. The goal of this set of maps is to find some underlying causal reasons for political stability(or more importantly instability) in the Middle East. These four maps focus on these key issues:

1. Century-old states are more stable today

2. Colonial rule led to fragile states

3. Instability and regime change

4. The shadow of the Cold War

 

Tags: MiddleEast, war, conflict, political, geopoliticshistorical.

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This is where your smartphone battery begins

This is where your smartphone battery begins | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Workers, including children, labor in harsh and dangerous conditions to meet the world’s soaring demand for cobalt, a mineral essential to powering electric vehicles, laptops, and smartphones, according to an investigation by The Washington Post.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 2, 6:47 PM

Links between the products we use and other people, places and environments - and the consequences of production. 

Gayle Kakac's curator insight, October 3, 10:31 AM
I'm afraid this is a very sad aspect of our technology.

ROCAFORT's curator insight, October 4, 2:29 AM
This is where your smartphone battery begins
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Why China and India face a marriage crisis

"What has lead to this marriage squeeze?  First, millions women have gone 'missing'. A generation ago, a preference for sons and the greater availability of prenatal screening meant first Chinese couples, then Indian ones, started aborting female fetuses and only giving birth to boys. At its extreme, in parts of Asia, more than 120 boys were being born for every 100 girls. Now, the generation with distorted sex ratios at birth is reaching marriageable age. The result is that single men far outnumber women."

 

Tags: gender, China, India, culture, population.


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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, September 17, 7:23 PM
Great food for thought!
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Climate Comparison Maps

Climate Comparison Maps | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Triton1982 makes maps by comparing each of the city's highest and lowest average temperatures against the Koppen classification system."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 12:50 PM

Many maps are shared on Reddit, and this series of maps help make some far off places easier to relate to.  I think these cross-regional comparisons can also help students also see that countries can have a great degree of internal variety.  

 

Tags: Australia, Oceania, mapping, visualization 

Profesor Vázquez Rubén Andrés's curator insight, September 13, 3:55 PM
Comparacion climatica
Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 5:46 PM

Australian climate. Note the comparative climates of our future case studies, Kosciuszko Alpine ecosystem and the Great Barrier Reef.

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Where our food came from

Where our food came from | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Explore the geographic origins of our food crops – where they were initially domesticated and evolved over time – and discover how important these 'primary regions of diversity' are to our current diets and agricultural production areas."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 14, 2:57 PM

This is an incredibly rich website with great interactive maps, dynamic charts, and text with rich citations.  This is one of those resources that an entire class could use as a starting point to create 30+ distinct project.  This is definitely one of the most important and best resources that I've shared recently, one that I'm going to use in my class.  Where did a particular crop originally come from?  Where is it produced today?   How do these historic and current agricultural geographies change local diets and economies around the world?  All these issues can be explored with this interactive that includes, but goes beyond the Columbian Exchange

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG, unit 5 agriculture, globalizationbiogeography, ecology, diffusion.

Sally Egan's curator insight, June 16, 6:43 PM

Great interactive map to illustrate the source regions of the world and foods that originated there. Hover over each region and the foods of that area popup.


Rory McPherson's curator insight, July 3, 5:39 PM

Very informative! It's great to learn where our food comes from. The author is able to communicate this information through simple but effective maps and visualizations.

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Pisa tests to include 'global skills' and cultural awareness

Pisa tests to include 'global skills' and cultural awareness | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Pisa tests, an international standard for comparing education systems around the world, could include a new measurement of global skills in the next round of tests in 2018. The OECD, which runs the tests in maths, reading and science, is considering adding another test which would look at how well pupils can navigate an increasingly diverse world, with an awareness of different cultures and beliefs. The OECD's education director Andreas Schleicher explains why there is such a need for new rankings to show young people's competence in a world where globalisation is a powerful economic, political and cultural force.

Education leaders around the world are increasingly talking about the need to teach 'global competences' as a way of addressing the challenges of globalisation."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 26, 7:18 PM

They define global competence as: "the capacity to analyse global and intercultural issues critically and from multiple perspectives, to understand how differences affect perceptions, judgements, and ideas of self and others, and to engage in open, appropriate and effective interactions with others from different backgrounds on the basis of a shared respect for human dignity".

 

So I guess geography does matter then.  Who knew? 

 

Tagsgeography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

Dafnord 's curator insight, June 2, 1:23 AM
Kansainvälistyminen nousee uudeksi mitattavaksi asiaksi PISA-tutkimuksissa 2018. Miten mahtaa suomalaisten peruskoulujen käydä? Pystyvätkö ne globaalitaidoissa ja kulttuurienvälisessa osaamisessa yltämään samalle tasolle kuin kansainvälistymisessä pitkälle edistyneet Britannia, Hollanti, Belgia tai Tanska. Oma kokemukseni jo 10 vuotta jatkuneesta Intia-yhteistyöstä (http://www.eumind.net) ei ennakoi Suomen kouluille huipputuloksia. Mutta toivotaan parasta.
Jaume Busquets's curator insight, June 4, 7:41 AM
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This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 1:17 PM

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, April 24, 4:39 AM
Food - naturally.
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11 incredible wilderness photographs from the 1800s

11 incredible wilderness photographs from the 1800s | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Early American wilderness photographers were snapping gorgeous vignettes of mountain peaks and sunrises before Instagram's 1977 filter was even a thing. But, aside from their timeless appeal, the true value of these nineteenth-century photographs is derived from their role in the American conservation movement."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 2:50 PM

Many National Parks (especially Yellowstone and Yosemite) are special to me because my grandparents took me there--these trips inspired in me a deep awe for the wonders of this Earth.    We owe a great debt of gratitude to these early photographers whose work captivated a nation to start a conservation ethos to protect wilderness.

 

Tags: place, images, art, landscape, California 

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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Just 15 years ago, cross-border digital flows were almost non-existent. Today, they exert a larger impact on global economic growth than traditional flows of goods, which developed over centuries.

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Rianne Tolsma's insight:

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, March 31, 6:13 AM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Trish Harris's curator insight, March 31, 7:40 AM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

malbert's curator insight, April 4, 4:15 PM

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Changing How We Think About Africa

Do you speak African? Well, neither do the 1 billion people on the continent.Africa is home to 54 different nations, more than 2,000 languages and four of the world's 10 fastest growing economies, but is often painted with a sweeping stroke of doom and gloom. In this week's Reality Check, Mehdi Hasan exposes popular misconceptions about the African continent.

Via Seth Dixon
Rianne Tolsma's insight:

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

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8A Luiza 's curator insight, March 11, 11:59 AM
I really loved this video, they showed that we must stop judging someone or something based on the "first impression" or in the media, who has a huge influence in our lives. When we think about Africa, almost everyone has the bad habit of thinking immediately in a poor country, undeveloped, with a hunger crisis..
Africa is much more than that! Has Africa poverty? Yes they have, but they also have wonderful things that we have never though about. 
Even as Thailand, Brazil, United States have bad things but they also have amazing things to show to the world, I believe that everyone, including me and you, has a talent to do something to help our planet. Enter in CMIS made me start thinking "out of the box", before this I had a formed opinion about the countries and people who lived there just based on what media said to me. Now I know that everyone in the world is different, and is what makes our world amazing! We cannot judge someone because of the place where comes from or the "first impression". We must know better people or the thing (such as countries or places)  before just throw words based on what people said to us. 
The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California's curator insight, March 11, 6:23 PM

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, March 21, 3:07 PM

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

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The Spice Trade's Legacy

The Spice Trade's Legacy | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"In its day, the spice trade was the world’s biggest industry. It established and destroyed empires and helped the Europeans (who were looking for alternate routes to the east) map the globe through their discovery of new continents. What was once tightly controlled by the Arabs for centuries was now available throughout Europe with the establishment of the Ocean Spice Trade route connecting Europe directly to South Asia (India) and South East Asia."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 17, 2:37 PM

The spice trade changed how we eat forever but it did so much more.  The fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Empire cut off Europe from the vital trade routes to the east and access to the most prized commodities of the day.  What drove European exploration to get around Africa and to cross the Atlantic?  It was to reshape their situation location relative to the economic networks that shaped the emerging global economy.  In essence, the spice trade reshaped the fortunes and trajectories of several major world regions.   

 

Tags: Southeast Asia, food productiondiffusionglobalization, agriculture, economicindustry, economic, historical, regions.

Liz Caughlin's curator insight, November 21, 7:45 PM
Spice trade and connections with diffusion of Islam
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The Environmental Cost of Consumption

The Environmental Cost of Consumption | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Environmental artist J Henry Fair captures the beauty and destruction of industrial sites to illustrate the hidden impacts of the things we buy – the polluted air, destroyed habitats and the invisible carbon heating the planet

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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 6:28 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impacts of human use of resources. The beautiful images illustrate the extreme impact on the environment.
Sally Egan's curator insight, October 30, 6:30 PM
Photographic essay illustrates the impact of human activity on environments.
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, November 16, 5:37 PM

Production and consumption - interconnections and consequences 

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U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography

U.S. Students Are Really Bad at Geography | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Your kid has no idea where Saudi Arabia – or maybe even South Carolina – is. Here's why.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 22, 2:40 PM

The U.S. government report on 8th grade geography is not a 'pick-me-up' but a sobering reminder of the task that lays before us.  This article quotes a few alliance coordinators on the current situation and how to change it. 

 

TagseducationK12geography education.

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Country Cluster Quiz

Country Cluster Quiz | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"No borders. No landmarks. No context. How many countries will you be able to recognize? Here’s how this works. I give you a the outline of several countries together, without borders or any other context, and you guess which countries you’re looking at."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 21, 4:26 PM

This is not the most difficult geography quiz (as advertised on Buzzfeed), but it does take some time since all the countries in a given cluster aren't all immediately obvious.  The fact that it is multiple choice certainly simplifies the this quiz.

 

Tagsmapping, trivia, funborders.

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'Leftover Women' in China

"Chinese women face immense pressure to get married before they turn 27. In many Chinese cities, so called marriage markets are a common sight, where parents go to post and match personal ads. A number of brave Chinese women have finally stood up to speak their mind against society’s labels and their parents' pressures."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 20, 2:07 PM

This emotional ad about 'leftover women' in China has received a lot of traffic and is now invigorating a national conversation about marriage customs, gendered norms, and cultural expectations.  What isn't as explicit in the video is how demographic policies and cultural preferences for boys has created the situation that puts added pressure on single women

 

Questions to Ponder: How is this (at least partially) a lingering impact of the One Child Policy?  What traits of traditional Chinese culture led to this current situation?   

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, China, culture, population.

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DON'T PANIC — Hans Rosling showing the facts about population


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 15, 3:49 PM

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

Kelly Bellar's curator insight, September 22, 6:54 PM

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

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The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing)

The rise of the Asian megacity (and why 'metacities' are the next big thing) | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Asia's rapid urbanisation is changing the very shape and nature of what we think of as a city.  It's not just the rapid increase in their numbers or their sheer size that makes these megacities fascinating. They look, feel and behave differently, too."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 12, 2:29 PM

The term megacity (a city with a population greater than 10 million) has been around for a while and there wasn't much linguistic need to describe something bigger.  Today, most megacities are more like Lagos and Mumbai, places of extreme wealth asymmetries than the global cities of New York City and London.  Some are now using the term metacity to describe cities with populations of 20 million.  Asian metacities are a good place to start thinking about the largest urban regions that are increasingly dominating economic, political and cultural affairs.      

 

Tags: urbanmegacitiesEast Asia.

Lee Hancock's curator insight, November 1, 8:48 PM

Mega city to Meta city...

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How Islam Created Europe

How Islam Created Europe | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"For centuries in early and middle antiquity, Europe meant the world surrounding the Mediterranean. It included North Africa, but the swift advance of Islam across North Africa in the seventh and eighth centuries virtually extinguished Christianity there, thus severing the Mediterranean region into two civilizational halves, with the 'Middle Sea' a hard border between them rather than a unifying force. Islam is now helping to undo what it once helped to create. A classical geography is organically reasserting itself, as the forces of terrorism and human migration reunite the Mediterranean Basin, including North Africa and the Levant, with Europe." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 12:12 PM

The title is a bit overstated (aren't they all in this click-bait driven media age?), but the article shows nicely how regions are cultural constructs that change over time. 

 

Tags: op-edregions, Europe, historical, Islamreligionhistorical, culture, Christianity.

association concert urbain's curator insight, September 22, 9:06 AM

 

The Atlantic

@TheAtlantic

Politics, culture, business, science, technology, health, education, global affairs, more. Tweets by @CaitlinFrazier

Washington, D.C.

 

theatlantic.com

Violaine Maelbrancke's curator insight, December 3, 12:06 PM
Dans sa cartographie, l'Europe a souvent intégré le nord africain qu'elle a pourtant colonisé et soumis. Bien que ce nord africain ait gagné son indépendance il a conservé une relation Nord-Sud privilégiée avec l'Europe. Le terrorisme permet aujourd'hui de reconstruire une Europe bien délimitée en détruisant ce que le nord africain avait dessiné.
L'auteur critique ici une volonté européenne d'intégrer d'autres pays dont la méthode est calquée sur la méthode romaine de constitution d'un empire. L' Europe doit aujourd'hui trouver un autre moyen d'intégrer de nouveaux pays pleinement. Pour l'exemple du nord africain elle doit apprendre à pleinement intégrer l'islam en abandonnant un peu la logique législative catégorisante. Il faudrait alors construire un système où ces grandes lois deviennent des valeurs universelles qui prennent en considération les individus et leurs droits selon une hiérarchie des besoins.
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Why Africa’s migrant crisis makes no sense to outsiders

Why Africa’s migrant crisis makes no sense to outsiders | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Violence and insecurity are so bad that other war-torn countries have become sites of refuge."

 

In 2015, nearly 100,000 Ethiopians and Somalis traveled by boat to Yemen, one of the world's most dangerous countries. Last year, nearly 5,000 citizens of Congo, which is fighting powerful rebel groups, were seeking refuge in the Central African Republic, itself torn apart by civil war. And yet 10,000 Burundians have fled their country's own growing civil unrest for Congo. Thousands of Nigerians escaping the extremist Islamist group Boko Haram have gone to Chad, where different strains of that same insurgency conduct frequent deadly attacks. 

 

Developing countries have long taken in a disproportionate number of the world's refugees — roughly 80 percent, according to the United Nations. But even for migration experts and relief workers, the willingness of refugees to leave one war for another is shocking. It's also proving an enormous challenge for humanitarian agencies, which are already overstretched and often not equipped to welcome refugees in countries that are still racked by conflict.

 

Tags: refugees, Africa, migration, conflict, political, war. 


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Utah's Great Salt Lake is shrinking

Utah's Great Salt Lake is shrinking | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Human activity is playing a role in the dwindling size of Utah's Great Salt Lake, according to new research.While the research group acknowledged the role that climate fluctuations, such as droughts and floods, have played in the shift of the lake's water levels over time, the decrease in the lake's size is predominantly due to human causes. According to the report, the heavy reliance on consumptive water uses has reduced the lake level by 11 feet and its volume by 48 percent.

 

Tags: physical, Utah, environment modify, environment, water.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 12:15 PM

The railroad causeway that creates the color difference between the northern and sotuhern portions of the Great Lake is as the Union Pacific plans to change the causeway; the proposed bridge would allow for the two distinct salinities to intermingle more.  Environmentally, this lake is not exceptional.  Like many lakes in dry climates with growing populations, the people are using the freshwater flow into the lakes more extensively than they have in the past.  The Great Salt Lake, the Aral Sea, Lake Chad, Lake Urmia, and the Dead Sea are all drying up.  

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 10, 11:05 PM
Another great example of human activities changing the biophysical environment.
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32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World

32 Maps That Will Teach You Something New About the World | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it
Our world is a complex network of people, places and things. Here are 32 maps will teach you something new about our interconnected planet.

Via Seth Dixon
Rianne Tolsma's insight:

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

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Jodi Esaili's curator insight, April 4, 9:28 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

macellomedeiros's curator insight, April 4, 10:18 AM

Some of these maps are more compellling than others (like all lists like this) but some are really telling.  The map above shows the dense concentration of tech corporate headquarters in Silicon Valley/San Francisco. 

 

Tags: technology, map, map archive. 

Lynne Stone's curator insight, August 30, 8:08 PM
Everything posted by Seth Dixon really contributes to our understanding to the world.
Rescooped by Rianne Tolsma from Geography Education
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These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital

These Charts Show How Globalization Has Gone Digital | kennisbasis aardrijkskunde | Scoop.it

"Yes, globalization. For many people, that word conjures up, at best, images of container ships moving manufactured goods from far-flung factories. At worst, it harkens back to acrid debates about trade deficits, currency wars and jobs moving to China. In fact, since the Great Recession of 2008, the global flow of goods and services has flattened, and cross-border capital flows have declined sharply. But globalization overall isn't on the wane. Like so much in our world today, it has reinvented itself by going digital."

 

Tags: technology, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.


Via Seth Dixon
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Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:31 PM
The times, they are a-changin'
Alisha Meyer's curator insight, March 24, 9:04 AM
Our world is changing, that is inevitable.  It's how we decide to use the technology and knowledge we now have to better ourselves or destroy ourselves.