Keeping taps on t...
Follow
Find
24 views | +0 today
Rescooped by Miguel Velez from Digital Presentations in Education
onto Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease
Scoop.it!

Five Best Mind Mapping Tools

Five Best Mind Mapping Tools | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Mind mapping is a great way to brainstorm, make a plan, or turn ideas into the steps needed to make it real. Thankfully, there are great tools out there to help you build mind maps, organize them, and save them for later.

Via Baiba Svenca
Miguel Velez's insight:

Training the brain is a great tool for patients with AD, it encourages them to think, which is the major issue in with AD patients. The more brain works the better they will feel integrated into a group therapy or perhaps the close family. Since the cognitive area is totally affected by AD, I strongly recommend recreational activities as,painting, crosswords puzzels, checkers, bingos, etc, anything that boosts them to think.

more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 3, 2013 6:26 AM

Could be helpful as I organize my dissertation topic.

Pam Mulready's curator insight, June 18, 2013 11:46 PM

Some more useful tools here for connecting concepts and thinking.

KOMADOK by D.FRAGUELA's curator insight, September 25, 2013 12:23 AM

Le mind map reste très utile pour vous aider à élaborer votre stratégie éditoriale en fonctions des objectifs de communication et/ou marketing que vous aurez préalablement définis.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

Little proof gum disease causes Alzheimer's - Nursing Times

Little proof gum disease causes Alzheimer's - Nursing Times | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Little proof gum disease causes Alzheimer's Nursing Times The news that gum disease may be linked to Alzheimer's disease is being widely reported, with headlines such as “Gum disease can lead to dementia” in The Sun and “Brushing your teeth reduces...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease - The New York Academy of Sciences

Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease - The New York Academy of Sciences | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease
The New York Academy of Sciences
The aging world population portends a global public health crisis as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias are expected to increase dramatically by 2050.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miguel Velez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Scientists Discover Quadruple Helix: Four Strand DNA In Human Cells

Scientists Discover Quadruple Helix: Four Strand DNA In Human Cells | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it

Four-stranded G-quadruplex nucleic acid structures are of great interest as their high thermodynamic stability under near-physiological conditions suggests that they could form inside living cells. A group of scientists now reports the generation and application of an engineered, structure-specific antibody employed to quantitatively visualize DNA G-quadruplex structures in living human cells. The show explicitly that G-quadruplex formation in DNA is modulated during cell-cycle progression and that endogenous G-quadruplex DNA structures can be stabilized by a small-molecule ligand. Together these findings provide substantive evidence for the formation of G-quadruplex structures in the genome of mammalian cells and corroborate the application of stabilizing ligands in a cellular context to target G-quadruplexes and intervene with their function.

 

From these experiments, we now know that G-quandruplexes form in the DNA of human cells. If anybody had mentioned this earlier, they would probably be labelled as crazy. Maybe we could take this as a lesson and accept the fact that there are always new discoveries to be made in biology, as well as the nature of our reality. For all we know, our DNA could be multidimensional in nature? It could be 12 stranded DNA? Maybe we have yet to discover it?  Maybe a majority of our DNA, and the biological functions it serves are largely undiscovered. Maybe some portions of our DNA have yet to be activated? The more we discover about our own biology, the better, as we are witnessing with the discovery of the G-quandruplex.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miguel Velez from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
Scoop.it!

Boosting Your Brainpower in Old Age: Do Scientists Really Think Mental Workouts Can Help?

Boosting Your Brainpower in Old Age: Do Scientists Really Think Mental Workouts Can Help? | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
...or is there no point in reading all those books, doing all those crosswords and keeping mentally active?

 

This study suggests that keeping mentally active really can protect us from cognitive decline with age. And it's never too early to start flexing those cognitive muscles.

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, July 12, 2013 1:43 AM

 

This study suggests that keeping mentally active really can protect us from cognitive decline with age. And it's never too early to start flexing those cognitive muscles.


Rescooped by Miguel Velez from Health Supreme
Scoop.it!

New study shows cannabinoids improve efficiency of mitochondria and remove damaged brain cells

New study shows cannabinoids improve efficiency of mitochondria and remove damaged brain cells | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it

A recent study conducted by Andras Biokei-Gorzo at the Institute of Molecular Psychiatry at the University of Bonn in Germany is suggesting that marijuana(or the activation of the brain’s cannabinoid system) triggers the release of antioxidants, which act as a cleansing mechanism.

 

This process is known to remove damaged cells and improve the efficiency of mitochondria. Mitochondria is the energy source that powers cells.  

 

These discoveries shed new insight on how natural marijuana cannabinoids hold the capacity to literally kill the brain inflammation responsible for causing cognitive decline, neural failure, and brain degeneration.


Via Sepp Hasslberger
more...
Anna Kenny's comment, July 19, 2013 12:14 PM
very interesting - hi sepp , anna in irland - hope you are well. i am still bookmarking all of these articles on cannabis too. today i was asked if i thought cannabis helped with epilepsy : they are funding a 200,00 e R and D project in our Uni at the moment on its therapeutic use with MS which is also neurological. It is being researched in Trinity also with Epilepsy. But as I wrote some months ago , my son was accused of being a drug addict and in need of counselling for smoking it for the THC .We dont extract the cannabis oil - both are used , but I think the cannabis oil is what they want to patent for therapeutic use or synthesize.
Anna Kenny's comment, July 19, 2013 12:17 PM
it is all about patents I think - when they have managed to synthesize specific formulations and blend with other components it will be sold as a pharmaceutical drug , illegal still any other way . to get it for therapeutic use in ireland you have to have MS. I tried to use all of the online info to argue for my sons return to his school - and we had a meet today with a social worker to discuss - she was very curious about how it would pan out : in a supportive way.
Sepp Hasslberger's comment, July 20, 2013 6:39 AM
Hi Anna, nice to see you here. There are loads of articles on cannabis and its good effects on health. You can find more of them by filtering the whole collection for the word cannabis...
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

Care in specialist medical and mental health unit compared with standard care for older people with cognitive impairment admitted to general hospital: randomised controlled trial (NIHR TEAM trial) ...

Care in specialist medical and mental health unit compared with standard care for older people with cognitive impairment admitted to general hospital: randomised controlled trial (NIHR TEAM trial) ... | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
AbstractObjective To develop and evaluate a best practice model of general hospital acute medical care for older people with cognitive impairment.Design Randomised controlled trial, adapted to take account of constraints imposed by a busy acute...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

"Great Oxidation Event" --A New Discovery of Evolutionary ...

"Great Oxidation Event" --A New Discovery of Evolutionary ... | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
For most terrestrial life on Earth, oxygen is necessary for survival. But the planet's atmosphere did not always contain this life-sustaining substance, and one of science's greatest mysteries is how and when oxygenic ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

What is Dementia? | Alzheimer's Reading Room

What is Dementia? | Alzheimer's Reading Room | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Dementia affects memory, thinking, language, judgment, behavior, and a person’s ability to perform normal daily activities.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

Alzheimer's disease triggered by stress hormone buildup: US study - National Post

Alzheimer's disease triggered by stress hormone buildup: US study - National Post | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Alzheimer's disease triggered by stress hormone buildup: US study National Post Elderly people could stave off Alzheimer's disease by taking supplements of B vitamins, after they were found to reduce the brain shrinkage associated with the disease...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

Music Helps Dementia Patients Improve Their Memory

Music Helps Dementia Patients Improve Their Memory | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Watch the video Music Helps Dementia Patients Improve Their Memory on Yahoo! Screen. An iPod, equipped with a personalized musical playlist, is helping seniors suffering from dementia. CBS2's Andrea Fujii reports.
Miguel Velez's insight:

http://screen.yahoo.com/music-helps-dementia-patients-improve-065500156.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

New migraine genes discovery could fuel future research - CBS News

New migraine genes discovery could fuel future research - CBS News | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
CBS News
New migraine genes discovery could fuel future research
CBS News
Dr.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

Hypometabolism in brain regions of cognitively normal patients associated with ... - News-Medical.net

Hypometabolism in brain regions of cognitively normal patients associated with ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miguel Velez from Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease
Scoop.it!

Ending Alzheimer's One Step at a Time

Ending Alzheimer's One Step at a Time | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Research into the causes and potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease has been as complicated as the disease itself.  Patti Davis borrowed the phrase “The Long Goodbye” in describing the declin...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

New Alzheimer's Disease Online CME Activity Features Q&A With Expert ... - San Francisco Chronicle (press release)

New Alzheimer's Disease Online CME Activity Features Q&A With Expert ... - San Francisco Chronicle (press release) | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
New Alzheimer's Disease Online CME Activity Features Q&A With Expert ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

Twitter / AstroKarenN: Brand new microscope assembled ...

Twitter / AstroKarenN: Brand new microscope assembled ... | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
RT @AstroKarenN: Brand new microscope assembled yesterday for use in #ISS Japanese Lab. New discoveries to come! http://t.co/5Tvk8SryrN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miguel Velez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Most Reported Genetic Associations with Intelligence Are Probably False Positives

Most Reported Genetic Associations with Intelligence Are Probably False Positives | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it

Genetics has great potential to contribute to psychology and the social sciences for at least two reasons. First, as human behavior involves the operation of the brain, understanding the genes whose expression affects the development and physiology of the brain can further our understanding of the causal chains connecting evolution, brain, and behavior. Second, because genetic differences can potentially account for some of the differences among individuals in cognitive function, behavior, and outcomes, any effort to paint a picture of the structure of human differences that does not incorporate genetics will be incomplete and possibly misleading.

 

Within psychology, the genetics of behavior has been explored since the earliest twin studies. Behavior genetic studies have shown that nearly all human behavioral traits are heritable. If a trait is heritable in the general population, then—with sufficiently large samples—it should be possible in principle to identify molecular genetic variants that are associated with the trait.

 

General cognitive ability, or g, is among the most heritable behavioral traits. Estimates of broad heritability as high as 0.80 have been reported for adult IQ measured in modern Western populations. Although the exact figures have been the topic of much debate, the claim that IQ is at least moderately heritable is widely accepted. IQ may in fact be similar in heritability to the physical trait of height. Both height and IQ are genetically “complex” because these traits are influenced by many genes, acting in concert with environmental factors, rather than being determined by single genetic variants. Finding genes associated with g could yield many potential benefits, among them new insights into the biology of cognition and its disorders. Such discoveries might suggest new therapeutic targets or pathways for potential treatments to improve cognition. Uncovering the molecular genetics of other traits and abilities, such as personality, time and risk preferences, and social skills could have similarly beneficial consequences.

 

By now there is a large literature of candidate gene studies showing associations between many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and g produced a comprehensive review of these studies. Here we report the results of a series of attempts to replicate as many published SNP-gassociations as possible, using data from three independent, large, well-characterized, longitudinal samples. We begin, in Study 1, with the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, which includes genotypes for 13 of the SNPs reported by Payton in 2009 to have published associations with g. These 13 SNPs are located in or near 10 different genes. In followup studies, we test 10 of the original 13 SNPs that were available in two other samples. In Study 2, we use the Framingham Heart Study (FHS; www.framinghamheartstudy.org), and in Study 3, we use data from the Swedish Twin Registry (STR; ki.se/ki/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=9610&l=en) to examine associations with g. Although we analyzed them separately, the combined sample size of these datasets is almost 10,000 individuals, which gives us considerable statistical power.

 

If the published SNP-g associations we examined were true positives in the general population, then we would expect many of them to replicate at the 5% significance level in our much larger datasets. However, if the literature on SNP-g associations consists mostly of false positives, then we would expect very few replications in our data. Such a result would not likely be due to differences in the methods used to estimate g in the various datasets under comparison, since g is consistently measured by a wide variety of well-designed tests.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miguel Velez from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Neanderthals shared speech and language with modern humans, study suggests

Neanderthals shared speech and language with modern humans, study suggests | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it

Fast-accumulating data seem to indicate that our close cousins, the Neanderthals, were much more similar to us than imagined even a decade ago. But did they have anything like modern speech and language? And if so, what are the implications for understanding present-day linguistic diversity? The MPI for Psycholinguistics researchers Dan Dediu and Stephen C. Levinson argue in their paper in Frontiers in Language Sciences that modern language and speech can be traced back to the last common ancestor we shared with the Neandertals roughly half a million years ago.

 

The Neanderthals have fascinated both the academic world and the general public ever since their discovery almost 200 years ago. Initially thought to be subhuman brutes incapable of anything but the most primitive of grunts, they were a successful form of humanity inhabiting vast swathes of western Eurasia for several hundreds of thousands of years, during harsh ages and milder interglacial periods. We knew that they were our closest cousins, sharing a common ancestor with us around half a million years ago (probably Homo heidelbergensis), but it was unclear what their cognitive capacities were like, or why modern humans succeeded in replacing them after thousands of years of cohabitation. Recently, due to new palaeoanthropological and archaeological discoveries and the reassessment of older data, but especially to the availability of ancient DNA, we have started to realise that their fate was much more intertwined with ours and that, far from being slow brutes, their cognitive capacities and culture were comparable to ours.


Dediu and Levinson review all these strands of literature and argue that essentially modern language and speech are an ancient feature of our lineage dating back at least to the most recent ancestor we shared with the Neanderthals and the Denisovans (another form of humanity known mostly from their genome). Their interpretation of the intrinsically ambiguous and scant evidence goes against the scenario usually assumed by most language scientists, namely that of a sudden and recent emergence of modernity, presumably due to a single – or very few – genetic mutations. This pushes back the origins of modern language by a factor of 10 from the often-cited 50 or so thousand years, to around a million years ago – somewhere between the origins of our genus, Homo, some 1.8 million years ago, and the emergence of Homo heidelbergensis. This reassessment of the evidence goes against a saltationist scenario where a single catastrophic mutation in a single individual would suddenly give rise to language, and suggests that a gradual accumulation of biological and cultural innovations is much more plausible.

 

Interestingly, given that we know from the archaeological record and recent genetic data that the modern humans spreading out of Africa interacted both genetically and culturally with the Neanderthals and Denisovans, then just as our bodies carry around some of their genes, maybe our languages preserve traces of their languages too. This would mean that at least some of the observed linguistic diversity is due to these ancient encounters, an idea testable by comparing the structural properties of the African and non-African languages, and by detailed computer simulations of language spread.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

New discoveries in veggies, fruits, plants - Inquirer.net

New discoveries in veggies, fruits, plants
Inquirer.net
Every day, there seems to be something new and inspiring discoveries about vegetables, fruits and plants, as well as other nutrients in general.
Miguel Velez's insight:

For the past 10 years I have totally changed my normal eating habits (red meat eateries), but that does not mean I once in a while I stop at a BK, Wendy's, etc and kill that craving. Am not 100% vegetarian, I am just  enjoying what mother nature has for all of us with out the extras that harm us. World wide the population in Okinawa, Japan, are the most that enjoy longevity. Reason enough for me to visit the Okinawan islands and make some research why. One of the islands Ishigaki, they feed their cows with beer, causing a higher quaility of beef.The also eat daily fresh fish and beggies, the elders sweep the sandy streets at 5am, they walk and practice meditation, yoga, taichi. My health has improved, and even my levels of neuralplasticity. I highly recommend you the challenge, eat,exercise,sleep well and we will meet at the top.What do you have to loose?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miguel Velez from :: The 4th Era ::
Scoop.it!

100 Search Engines For Academic Research | TeachThought

100 Search Engines For Academic Research | TeachThought | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it

by TeachThought staff

 

"Back in 2010, we shared with you 100 awesome search engines and research resources in our post: 100 Time-Saving Search Engines for Serious Scholars. It’s been an incredible resource, but now, it’s time for an update. Some services have moved on, others have been created, and we’ve found some new discoveries, too. Many of our original 100 are still going strong, but we’ve updated where necessary and added some of our new favorites, too. Check out our new, up-to-date collection to discover the very best search engine for finding the academic results you’re looking for."


Via Jim Lerman
more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, July 1, 2013 4:03 AM

Many more to add to the list:

Copernic Agent: http://www.copernic.com/en/products/agent/index.html

 

Under other niches - Zotero: http://www.zotero.org/

Search Credible: http://www.searchcredible.com/

 

Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

How Alzheimer's Spreads Throughout the Brain | Alzheimer's Reading Room

How Alzheimer's Spreads Throughout the Brain | Alzheimer's Reading Room | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Alzheimer's is not very well understood, and it is hard to understand. This video, in my opinion, serves as a "foundation" to understanding.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

What's the Difference Between Alzheimer's and Dementia? | Alzheimer's Reading Room

What's the Difference Between Alzheimer's and Dementia? | Alzheimer's Reading Room | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
There is confusion about the difference between “dementia” and “Alzheimer's disease.” The confusion is felt on the part of patients, family, the media, and healthcare providers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

New research sheds light on possible cause of Alzheimer's disease - OregonLive.com

New research sheds light on possible cause of Alzheimer's disease - OregonLive.com | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Toronto NewsFIX New research sheds light on possible cause of Alzheimer's disease OregonLive.com The OHSU study, published this month in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, investigated the physical interaction between amyloid-beta and tangles of...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Miguel Velez from Big Data, Cloud and Social everything
Scoop.it!

Big data brings new vigor to health research -- FCW

Big data brings new vigor to health research -- FCW | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
Today's data tools open the door to new scientific discoveries and better understanding of healthcare trends.

Via Pierre Levy
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

Academy's Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Dementia Initiative Tackles Obstacles ... - The New York Academy of Sciences

Academy's Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and Dementia Initiative Tackles Obstacles ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Velez
Scoop.it!

All-day event honoring those facing Alzheimer's disease set for June 21 in ... - The Huntsville Times - al.com

All-day event honoring those facing Alzheimer's disease set for June 21 in ... - The Huntsville Times - al.com | Keeping taps on the Alzheimer's Desease | Scoop.it
All-day event honoring those facing Alzheimer's disease set for June 21 in ...
more...
No comment yet.