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Keep the "serve" in customer service!
Listen to the voice of the customer, be passionate about "serving!"
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Six Habits of Highly Grateful People

Six Habits of Highly Grateful People | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Bad at gratitude? Six practices of people who know how to say "Thanks!"

Via Cathryn Wellner, Bobby Dillard
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Pat Headley's curator insight, March 21, 3:36 AM

Six Habits of Highly Grateful People

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Tweet from @TumblrEdits

Tweet from @TumblrEdits | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
A new way of judging customer service! http://t.co/obCd2V3A62
Robin Martin's insight:

Pretty brave...but appropriate?

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Meaning of effective customer care - Zambia Daily Mail (blog)

Meaning of effective customer care - Zambia Daily Mail (blog) | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Zambia Daily Mail (blog)
Meaning of effective customer care
Zambia Daily Mail (blog)
CUSTOMER care applies to everyone regardless of whether you work or not and regardless of whether or not you work for a profit-making organisation.
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Atlanta Comedian Ben Palmer is a Customer Service Rep on Facebook

Atlanta Comedian Ben Palmer is a Customer Service Rep on Facebook | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Comedian Ben Palmer is owning Facebook timelines across Atlanta right now.
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**What Happens When You Stop Listening To Your Customers? - The Email Marketing Blog

**What Happens When You Stop Listening To Your Customers? - The Email Marketing Blog | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
RT @freshbusiness: Email Marketing: **What Happens When You Stop Listening To Your Customers? http://t.co/MiqkUvgLNq
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How do you lose 82% of your customers? Bad customer service.

How do you lose 82% of your customers? Bad customer service. | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
No one really wants to lose 82% of your customers, right? They do if they have bad customer service. A recent survey published in the Customer Experience Impac(...)
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10 Reasons to Pick Up the Phone Now

10 Reasons to Pick Up the Phone Now | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Today fewer people get on the phone, preferring to text, chat, and e-mail. Here are 10 scenarios where a live voice is still the best option.
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Bad and Excellent Client/Customer Service Cartoons | Download Business Cartoons Online: Business Around The Globe.Com - Kothek SME/SMB Solutions

Bad and Excellent Client/Customer Service Cartoons | Download Business Cartoons Online: Business Around The Globe.Com - Kothek SME/SMB Solutions | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Business-Around-The-Globe has Client/Customer Service Cartoons and Images Online.
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Better customer service | Patients expect more than an eye exam | OD Social Net

Better customer service | Patients expect more than an eye exam | OD Social Net | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
People judge you by things they know and understand. They don't know beans about eye exams. They know how they feel and how they were treated by you and your staff (Patients judge your by what they understand not your skills.
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Customer Service -- May I Help You? - Huffington Post (blog)

Customer Service -- May I Help You? - Huffington Post (blog) | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Customer Service -- May I Help You?
Huffington Post (blog)
"Customer service -- May I help you?
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The Voice of The Customer – it is getting LOUDER! | Dembridge

The Voice of The Customer – it is getting LOUDER! | Dembridge | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
RT @Dembridge: It takes years to build a customer base. It can take 1 minute to destroy it. The customer speaks loudest. http://t.co/NTyujMKBku
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The Content Marketing "Keystone"...the mirage of inbound marketing

The Content Marketing "Keystone"...the mirage of inbound marketing | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
The biggest content marketing myth is that there is 1 key step. It is a system & inbound marketing success requires an integrated, relentless effort.
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Why a 20-Minute Presentation Always Beats a 60-Minute One - Forbes

Why a 20-Minute Presentation Always Beats a 60-Minute One - Forbes | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
The science behind your audience's attention span should influence the length of your next presentation.

Via JLAndrianarisoa, Bobby Dillard
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JLAndrianarisoa's curator insight, January 26, 2013 8:54 AM

Stick to the Goldilocks Zone

John Michel's curator insight, January 26, 2013 4:04 PM

it turns out 20 minutes is the optimal length of a presentation. Some people might argue, “I have too much to say. I can’t possibly deliver all the information in twenty minutes.” Try to do it anyway. Your presentation will be far more impactful and creative simply by going through the exercise. Matthew May’s new book, The Lawof Subtraction, explains the science behind it. According to May, “Creativity thrives under intelligent constraints.” May persuasively argues that by establishing a boundary or limit to the presentation, it provides a focus and a framework for creativity to flourish. “Recent studies offer evidence that, contrary to popular belief, the main event of the imagination—creativity—does not require unrestrained freedom; rather, it relies on limits and obstacles.”

////////

John Michel, experienced leader, humanitarian, visioneer, and renown status quo buster, is the author of the ground breaking book, Mediocre Me: How Saying No to the Status Quo will Propel you from Ordinary to Extraordinary. Check out his blog at www.MediocreMe.com or drop him a note at johnmichel@MediocreMe.com



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When the Self-Service Customer Smiles - Entrepreneur

When the Self-Service Customer Smiles - Entrepreneur | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Entrepreneur
When the Self-Service Customer Smiles
Entrepreneur
The route to your creating a positive relationship with customers who access a service without any direct personal contact is to simulate characteristics within a partnership.
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Customers Prefer Round Prices

Customers Prefer Round Prices | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Studies show that customers prefer round prices.
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Becoming a beacon of customer service - Intelligent Utility

Becoming a beacon of customer service - Intelligent Utility | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Becoming a beacon of customer service
Intelligent Utility
After facing a variety of challenges over the last decade—both internal and external—Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) customer satisfaction reached an all-time low in early 2012.
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Channel Your Inner Customer | NY Report

Channel Your Inner Customer | NY Report | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
NY Report |
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The Rewired Customer: Ready. Set. Change. Repeat.

The Rewired Customer: Ready. Set. Change. Repeat. | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it

 

There has been an astonishing stream of innovations in retail, as well as in health care, financial services, and other consumer-oriented sectors. But are changes in consumer shopping behavior simply the inevitable response to innovation? Or are there other factors that help explain the seismic shifts in consumer behavior that have taken place?

 

What’s driving this trend?

 

Through extensive research, Michael Merzenich and other neuroscientists have observed that the human brain is incredibly plastic, even in adulthood, constantly adapting to shifts in our circumstances and experiences. Although the research originally described how brains adapt to trauma, scientists now believe that it has broader applications.

 

“We have learned that neuroplasticity is not only possible but that it is constantly in action,” writes Mark Hallett, head of the Medical Neurology Branch of the National Institutes of Health. “That is the way we adapt to changing conditions, the way we learn new facts, and the way we develop skills.”  “Plasticity,” says Alvaro Pascual-Leone, a Harvard Medical School researcher, is “the normal ongoing state of the nervous system throughout the life span. Our brains are constantly changing in response to our experiences and our behavior, reworking their circuitry with each sensory input, motor act, association, reward signal, action plan, or [shift of] awareness.”


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Robin Martin's insight:

Ready, set, change! Yes, your customers can handle it, and...most likely appreciate it!

 

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 30, 2013 7:47 PM

How can companies shape and sense consumers’ rapidly evolving modes of engagement—with retailers and with each other—to support future growth?

Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's comment, May 1, 2013 6:13 PM
Very true. It is time for change.
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15 Important Tips To Help You Keep Your Customers

15 Important Tips To Help You Keep Your Customers | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it

Excerpted from article:
"According to the Harvard Business School, increasing customer retention rates by 5 percent increases profits by 25 percent to 95 percent.
In order to help you increase your own retention rates, we’ve compiled a list of our 15 favorite tips (backed by academic research and case studies) on increasing customer loyalty, divided into five easy-to-browse sections.

- Communication
It’s hard to create loyal customers if they aren’t paying attention to you. Given this fact, below are our favorite bits of research on clear communication with customers.
1. Stand for something;
2. Utilize positive social proof;
3. Invoke the inner ego;

- Selling
If customers don’t enjoy your selling process, they’ll likely never do business with you again. Thus, selling to customers the “correct” way is an integral part of creating customer loyalty. Below are a few studies to help you improve the process.
4. Use the words they love to hear;
5. Reduce pain points and friction;

- Reciprocity
Reciprocity is the social construct that makes the world go ’round… or in your case, keeps your customers coming back. The premise is simple: Go above and beyond for customers and get rewarded with repeat business. The execution, however, can be trickier, so below is a compilation of interesting research on how to improve reciprocity with your customers.
6. Realize that budget is negligible;
7. Utilize surprise reciprocity;
8. Make it personal;

- Support
This one is a no-brainer: You can’t create a tribe of loyal customers without an exceptional customer service experience that keeps them coming back. In this section, we’re going to bust a few customer service myths wide open, as well as tackle some important things you need to keep in mind when offering support online.
9. Speed is secondary to quality;
10. Customers enjoy businesses who know them;
11. Choose the right platform;
12. Make it a communal effort;

- Loyalty Programs
The key to creating customer loyalty programs that work is to know why customers use them and what gets customers to keep using them. Below you’ll find consumer research that answers these questions.
13. Get people started;
14. Get ideal customers to be VIPs;
15. Label your customers..."

Each tip is analyzed with more information. Read full article here:
http://www.convinceandconvert.com/social-media-marketing/15-important-tips-to-help-you-keep-your-customers/

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Rim Riahi's curator insight, March 14, 2013 1:56 AM

According to the Harvard Business School, increasing customer retention rates by 5 percent increases profits by 25 percent to 95 percent.
In order to help you increase your own retention rates, we’ve compiled a list of our 15 favorite tips (backed by academic research and case studies) on increasing customer loyalty, divided into five easy-to-browse sections.

Gaurav Pandey's curator insight, March 14, 2013 7:42 PM

Excellent post.

 

I'd like to add a few thoughts here: 

 

Customer retention is all about value creation and engagement. Don't make it all about your brand, some fun and entertainment such as polls, infographics, sweepstakes, pictures, videos etc. go a long way in retaining interest in your brand.

 

With the overload of one-dimensional posts on social pages of brands, it's even more important for marketers to go that extra mile  to gauge the pulse of your community. That said, you have to build a community first.

 

Social networks and communities are different, although there may be some overlap. It's these communities which will really provide momentum to your campaigns. By brining like-minded people together as part of these communities, businesses come across as more transparent and supportive than agressive. This is because in a community individuals come together and that gives them the power to decide collectively, to spread the word and take actions which are not forced on them.


If brands recognise this, they will understand that building communities and not just social networks is the way forward. Community building takes more than a few promoted posts and luring customers in with discount coupons, it takes sustained effort at building trust. And if a company manages to achieve this, the rewards are plentiful as their customers will then act as their brand ambassadors helping spread the message organically.

 

So my advice to marketers is be open, be responsive, be socially responsible and build trust through sustained effort. 

Please let me know your thoughts.

 

Cheers! 

Steve Bosworth's curator insight, March 27, 2013 12:47 AM

Excellent piece - read Convince and Convert #leadership 

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B2B Voice of the Customer: Commitment

B2B Voice of the Customer: Commitment | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Voice of the Customer (VOC) strategies are increasingly important for both B2C and B2B organizations as the market demands greater attention to customer experience, engagement and retention efforts....
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Listening Skills for Phone Conversations | Your Voice of Encouragement

RT @MeredithMBell: Do you stay focused as a listener when you're on the phone? http://t.co/GwmM3YRYfV #listening
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Tales of Customer Service | Under The Influence with Terry O'Reilly | CBC Radio

Tales of Customer Service | Under The Influence with Terry O'Reilly | CBC Radio | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
. video-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56. 25%; padding-top: 30px; height: 0; overflow: hidden; } . video-container iframe, . video-container object, .
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Princeton-based chef put through the ringer by Gordon Ramsay on Hell's Kitchen - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com

Princeton-based chef put through the ringer by Gordon Ramsay on Hell's Kitchen - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
Princeton-based chef put through the ringer by Gordon Ramsay on Hell's Kitchen The Star-Ledger - NJ.com “I went to see the casting directors in New York, and when I got the phone call saying they wanted to ship me out to L.A., I thought, 'Wow,...
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Companies struggle to use social for marketing and customer service: report

Companies struggle to use social for marketing and customer service: report | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it
With countless consumers around the world using social media, it's no surprise that companies have flocked to services like Facebook and Twitter.
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America's Happiest Companies Make More Money

America's Happiest Companies Make More Money | Keep the "serve" in customer service! | Scoop.it

Workplace happiness may seem like a fuzzy concept when it comes to financial value. But as the Parnassus Workplace Fund has proven, dignity has - and creates - value.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, AlGonzalezinfo
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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, February 22, 2013 10:50 AM

 

"At this point, the evidence suggests many of us remain suspicious of any firm that, say, allows its employees to play foosball or shoot hoops during work hours.

 

But our enduring cynicism may also have its roots in traditional beliefs about leadership effectiveness.

 

Many of us have been taught that it’s actually desirable to have some worker unhappiness. The idea is that keeping people under some constant tension actually is a more powerful driver of productivity.

 

There’s also the concern that when employees are cared for to any extent they’re likely to get soft in the middle--so sufficiently sated that motivation to work hard and produce is spoiled. "

 

Check out this article for evidence that suggests that our enduring cynicism  and thought patterns are wrong...

donhornsby's curator insight, February 23, 2013 9:03 AM

(From the article): According to a 1997 article in the San Francisco Chronicle, many business leaders dismissed Moskowitz’s earliest list of “Best Places To Work” and derided it as being “a ’beauty contest’ that didn’t matter to anyone outside of corporate personnel departments.” But Moskowitz, and soon after, Dodson, have gone on to prove that the leaders at organizations which ensure employees feel valued, supported, developed, and rewarded are the most enlightened. They inspire a greatly expanded bottom line and set an example for all to follow in this 21st century.