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The style of photography with your phone

The style of photography with your phone | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it
In these days everyone is carries mobile with them; most of the people have mobile phone with inbuilt camera. It this way the craziness among people about photography has been increased.

Via jack hollingsworth
Katie Webber's insight:

Almost everyone these days has a smart phone with a good camera on it. Most of the cameras have features that will make the photos look even better too and it is good to know how to use them. When you use everything correctly and add your creativity, beautiful pictures can be taken. Some people don't use their creativity and that makes the pictures they share not very good. I feel embarrassed for some people because they take the same boring photos all the time. So take a moment to think before you take the picture and doing just that will help your photography skills with your phone. 

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Rescooped by Katie Webber from Fuji X-Pro1
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What is street photography? | Ming Thein

What is street photography? | Ming Thein | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it

 

Sometimes, I think I’m a bit of a masochist. I actually like to shoot difficult subjects, and increasingly of late I’m also starting to write a lot about difficult topics. Today’s article seems like a very simple question to answer: what is street photography? The more I try to nail it down – and I spent a considerable amount of time on this before the Finding Light workshop – so I would know what to cover, and more importantly, what my students would expect me to cover. The first point of confusion comes when you try to decide what is ‘street’ and what isn’t: what about public spaces? What about museums, galleries, fora etc? Stairs? Restaurants? Hawker centers? Public transport, like the Underground? And here’s another question: does street photography always have to have human subjects in the frame? And when does street photography turn into travel reportage? You can see how this becomes confusing. I’ve decided that in general, the genre is loosely defined around several broad guidelines (at least for me; your mileage may vary). Let’s take a closer look at these.

 

Street photography is unplanned.
If you’re controlling any of the elements in the scene, then it starts to become a conceptual or even outdoor studio shoot – posed models in public definitely do not count as street photography: the photographer knew (or should have known) exactly what poses, look and lighting he wanted before beginning the shoot. (You certainly wouldn’t hire a model and get shooting permission if you had no intention to shoot there, would you?) There is also a reactive element to it – spontaneity and the ability to anticipate are both critical tools for the street photographer. You really never know what you’re going to get on any given day, and that’s what draws photographers to the genre: a never-ending source of material...

 


Via Thomas Menk
Katie Webber's insight:

Street photography is very spontaneous. It can't be planned if it is, it's a photo shoot of certain people. What you are taking a picture of is unexpected; it could be anything that happens. You don't need people to do street photography, but most of the time there is because you are on city streets and that is where all the people are. Buildings and objects in the streets are part of street photography. It's in public so it could be of anything with a subject. You are capturing life in action through a camera lens.

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The style of photography with your phone

The style of photography with your phone | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it
In these days everyone is carries mobile with them; most of the people have mobile phone with inbuilt camera. It this way the craziness among people about photography has been increased.

Via jack hollingsworth
Katie Webber's insight:

Almost everyone these days has a smart phone with a good camera on it. Most of the cameras have features that will make the photos look even better too and it is good to know how to use them. When you use everything correctly and add your creativity, beautiful pictures can be taken. Some people don't use their creativity and that makes the pictures they share not very good. I feel embarrassed for some people because they take the same boring photos all the time. So take a moment to think before you take the picture and doing just that will help your photography skills with your phone. 

more...
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Rescooped by Katie Webber from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Having to Explain the Beautiful Concept of Film Photography to Modern Kids

Having to Explain the Beautiful Concept of Film Photography to Modern Kids | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it
In today’s modern era, some photography enthusiasts might argue that smartphones and digital cameras have rendered film photography obsolete, but for those who remember the thrill of picking up developed photos at the camera store, of tearing into...

Via Thomas Faltin
Katie Webber's insight:

It is crazy to think back to when everyone did film photography. It's a lost art now. We all have phones now to take hundreds of pictures. Before phones came around we all had film cameras and when we took pictures we gave more thought to what we were taking a picture of because you had a limited amount of film. You couldn't look at the picture you took a second later. You would have to wait to develop the pictures. It's sad to think in the future people won't even know what film photography is. 

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Rescooped by Katie Webber from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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How Poor Graphic Design kills Your Brand

How Poor Graphic Design kills Your Brand | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it
A brand is one of the most amazing phenomenons in business. A great brand is a living, breathing specimen that must be cared for.

Via Thomas Faltin
Katie Webber's insight:

Graphic Design affects buisnesses greatly. Colors play a huge part with designs because people feel different emotions with different colors. Symbols and fonts do the same too. Graphic Designers need to make their art the emotion that the buisness wants their costumers to feel. You dont want too much going on with shapes and colors. If there are, then people get confused.

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Some Graphic Design Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

Some Graphic Design Mistakes and How to Avoid Them | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it
Graphic designing is both an art and science. Graphic designing is a field where the designer combines texts and graphics to create a visual communication with the target audiences.

Via Thomas Faltin
Katie Webber's insight:

In Graphic Design you need to make sure you spend your time wisely because if you don't then your work will look sloppy. Graphic Designers have to make sure they keep organized and know what their costumer wants so there are no mistakes. If you do make mistakes that will affect your reputation. When they are doing projects they need to make sure that it isn't similar to anyone else's because that will be bad. Graphic Design takes a lot of time and effort to make the details on projects perfect. 

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Graphic Design Education and Career Paths - GraphicDesign.com

Graphic Design Education and Career Paths - GraphicDesign.com | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it
Neil Tortorella, veteran in the Graphic Design industry enlightens us on various educational options for designers and provides useful links for further insight.
Katie Webber's insight:

This article really goes into depth of what it takes to major in Graphic Design. It's not just making logos. You also need to know a lot more about colors and shapes. It takes a lot of time and money to make it a career because after you graduate it's not easy to find a job right away. There will also be a time when there will be no jobs available so you will have to make your own business. Which means you should be familiar with sales and marketing in order to make that happen.

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Landscape photography, part one: a few principles | Ming Thein

Landscape photography, part one: a few principles | Ming Thein | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it


I’ll be straight up honest here: I’m not known as a landscape photographer. Far from it, in fact. But that hasn’t stopped me from experimenting, and as we all know, experimentation is the key to artistic development and evolution: applying what you learn in one discipline to your others can result in something unique, and vice versa. I think the relationship between landscape, cityscape and architectural photography is pretty obvious. Might I approach a watch or food plating as a landscape in future? Why not! Or treat a landscape as an abstract? Certainly. Let’s start – as usual – by throwing the rule book out of the window. Warning: I’m going to make some people very angry here. Forget the rule of thirds, fifths, golden proportion, whatever – if your subject doesn’t fit the composition, it doesn’t fit. And there’s simply no way the rule of thirds can apply universally across multiple aspect ratios; a square will have very different balance properties to a 16:9 cinematic.....


Via Thomas Menk
Katie Webber's insight:

I have always loved landscape photography and this article really gives a different perspective to it than I've ever thought of. I have to agree with all the tips given. The light used must be natural because the flash just doesn't give the same effect. You deffinetly need to plan ahead to what time of day you will be taking pictures because of the lighting at sertain times. The weather always has to do with a good photo. I myself have experienced that if it is too foggy, you won't be able to see the sunset or view of what you are taking a picture of as well.

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Edo Lucas's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:26 AM

Experimenteren is alles wat je kan doen als je geen expert bent. Genieten van je foto's is het belangrijkste wat er is

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Pop Art Design – review | Art and design | The Observer

Pop Art Design – review | Art and design | The Observer | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it
Partying meets pragmatism in an enjoyable new exhibition exploring the exchange of ideas between pop artists with the bold, playful designers of the day, writes Rowan Moore.
Katie Webber's insight:

I have always wanted to know more about pop art. All I knew before was that it makes pieces of art look 3D. Pop art is very modern because of all the new technology we have and makes the obects realistic and beautiful. It is an amzing art and gives people a different point of view of what it is.

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Rescooped by Katie Webber from Fuji X-Pro1
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Architectural Photography - Towering Sky | Ken Rowland

Architectural Photography - Towering Sky | Ken Rowland | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it


Architectural photography has always been one of my great interests. Capturing the essence of what an architect was envisioning when a plan was created can be challenging in a number of ways. Architectural photography requires you to take perspective into account as well as surrounding distractions as you attempt to create the image.


The Story

Pictured above is another SunTrust Bank building in downtown Atlanta. As much time as I’ve spent around their facilities one might think I was stalking them! They occupy some fantastic looking architecture in Atlanta. In studying this building, I was really intrigued with the patterns created by the blocks in the building. I envisioned a dramatic black and white image utilizing those patterns and the clouds above in the final product.


Equipment and Processing

This image was taken with the Fuji X-Pro1 and the Fuji 18-55mm zoom lens. After importing it into Lightroom for some minor adjustments I exported it to Photoshop where I applied a motion blur filter to the clouds to add some drama. I then converted the image to black and white using Silver Efex Pro. Some minor dodging and burning to retain detail in the building and it was finished.


Via Thomas Menk
Katie Webber's insight:

With architectural photography you really need to focus on perspective because of the structure of the building. Taking pictures of buildings always gives you a different way of looking at it then you usually would. When you are looking more closely at them you can see the beautiful patterns in the bricks. Architects envision there art in a certain way when they design it and that's what you want to capture.

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Rescooped by Katie Webber from Everything Photographic
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101 Portrait Photography Tips

101 Portrait Photography Tips | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it
These 101 portrait photography tips will help photographers learn to take their portrait photography of people to the next level by learning new techniques.

Via Tiaan Jonker
Katie Webber's insight:

When you are taking portraits, it is better to have the people doing what is comfortable to them. Being in a studio is awkward for most people and that shows in their face. It is also good to have the camera at the same eye level as the person you are taking a picture of. In every picture they don't need to be looking straight at the camera either. It looks better sometimes if you have them looking out into space. When you are outside with poor lighting it's always a good idea to have them face away from the sun because their face will be more shaded. Portrait photography has a lot of different tips you could follow. Take your time and take a lot of different pictures like of them smiling or not smiling. 

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Landscape photography, part two: applied landscapes | Ming Thein

Landscape photography, part two: applied landscapes  | Ming Thein | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it

 

In the previous article, we looked at some of the fundamental principles of landscape photography. Today, we’re going to question more of those assumptions and see how those principles apply equally to a very diverse range of subjects. Let’s start with what is, on the face of things, a fairly obvious question: At what point does a landscape turn into a cityscape turn into architecture turn into urban reportage/ flaneur photography? If you have an expansive natural scene with one remote house on it, is it still a landscape? I think nobody would argue with you on that one. Two houses? A small town? Maybe it’s a question of scale, or visual dominance? What about a physically small scene with predominantly natural elements – that’s a landscape, surely. But what if the scene is man-made with merely the inclusion of natural elements? I’m sure a carefully-planned Japanese garden is definitely landscape material. Regardless of the answer, I think we can all agree that the lines become increasingly blurred......


Via Thomas Menk
Katie Webber's insight:

There are a lot of different types of landscapes. If what you are looking at has something natural or man made it is still a landsape. Everything in the picture seems to be frozen. Even the water, cars, or people. You don't need to be far away from what you are taking a picture of. The landscape can be of something with detail, close up. As long as you have technique, you can capture beautiful things.

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Rescooped by Katie Webber from The world of photojournalism
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OBJECTIVITY AND PHOTO JOURNALISM

OBJECTIVITY AND PHOTO JOURNALISM | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it

ORIGINALLY SUBMITTED FOR BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY MA INTERNATIONAL JOURNALISM COURSE  It could be argued photos are one of the most important parts of news as they visualize events to the audience. 


Via Gisle Oddstad
Katie Webber's insight:

People may think thaht photographers are objective when they do their job. In reality though they can never be. It is just their judgement when they decide how and where they take the pictures. When photos are edited it takes away what is actually going on, but there are times when they have to be edited to make them better for the public. The pictures tell the truth and thats what people dont understand.  

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Rescooped by Katie Webber from Photography Now
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Joan Fontcuberta: The Photography of Nature & The Nature of Photography | Conscientious Photography Magazine

Joan Fontcuberta: The Photography of Nature & The Nature of Photography | Conscientious Photography Magazine | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it

Of course, pictures lie (or can be made to tell a tall tale). We all know that. If all Fontcuberta had ever done was to produce cleverly Photoshopped images of the aforementioned centaur, say, that would not be very interesting. That said, those people trying to sell us something with pictures (remember this or that?) might want to look at Fontcuberta’s work. What has struck me about all those cases that have recently made the news is how amateurish the fakery has been.


Via Mario Pires
Katie Webber's insight:

It is crazy that people can change photos easily with photoshop these days. Its hard to tell when pictures have been tampered with or not. So when there are pictures of mermaids we dont believe that it is even real because it could have been heavily photoshopped. Its sad to say that sometimes we can't even tell that there was anything done to pictures even though the original looks completely different.

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Mario Pires's curator insight, January 10, 5:34 AM

Joan Fontcuberta work tests the limits of our believability. All photographs lie.

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One day, a computer will fit on a desk (1974) - YouTube

Science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke makes the bold claim that one day computers will allow people to work from home and access their banking records. Wat...
Katie Webber's insight:

This video is so cool to watch because they are talking about what computers will be like in the 21st century. And here we are a computer dependent society just like he said. Not only do we have a computer on our desk but everyone has one that fits in their pocket. They do really help us though because we can learn and discover more with computers because they help us get tasks done they we weren't able to before.  

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How photography can affect your memory (if you aren’t paying attention)

How photography can affect your memory (if you aren’t paying attention) | Katie's Senior Project Becoming a Photographer | Scoop.it
    A research article just published in the journal Psychological Science has shown an interesting impact on people's memory if they photograph an event rather than simply observing it — but what the paper doesn't…...

Via planetMitch
Katie Webber's insight:

This study is really interesting. I have to say myself that I agree with all of this. Whenever I just take pictures of objects from far away, I don't remember it as well compared to when I do take close up pictures. The next time I take pictures I'm going to pay closer attention to what I'm taking so I can have a better memory of what I'm looking at.

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