Katie's Midsummer Night's Dream
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A Midsummer Night's Dream~Video~

A Midsummer Night's Dream~Video~ | Katie's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

"A Midsummer Night's Dream." Cambio. N.p., 03 Oct. 2011. Web. 05 Mar. 2013.

katie McMullin's insight:

This video demonstrates almost the entire play of "A Midsummer Night's Dream". Each character is introduced and because it's a cartoon, it's relatively easy to understand. Most of the facts seem accurate and it really flows together nicely, as if it were a real movie. It shows the play in a comical way you wouldn't expect, but that's what makes the scenes so entertaining to watch. It just goes to show how influential Shakespeare was and still is to this day especially when geared-towards the entertainment industry. Personally, when I saw this video a few times, I laughed for a good ten minutes, however, most people probably won't think it's as funny as I did. I just thought the characters were funny and the way they talked all throughout the play made me appreciate how complex the story is. It also allowed me to come to the conclusion that even plays that don't appear to be funny or entertaining can be viewed in many different ways. That's why some people can see a video or read a play and think it's hilarious and others might see it as the complete opposite.     

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Matthew Ethier's comment, March 10, 2013 10:16 PM
Hey Katie! I liked your scoop it vdeo and it helped me understand the play better!
Jennifer Houde's comment, March 10, 2013 11:41 PM
I agree with Matt, I liked this video a lot because it showed the play in a clear and funny way!
Julia Cloutier's comment, March 13, 2013 8:51 PM
I also agree with Jen and Matt! Your video wasn't like everybody else's and I liked the new twist you took on the video representaton.
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Puck in the Play "A Midsummer Night's Dream"~Picture~

Puck in the Play "A Midsummer Night's Dream"~Picture~ | Katie's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

"Lori Ann DeLappe-Grondin Photography Home." Lori Ann DeLappe-Grondin Photography Home. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2013.

katie McMullin's insight:

I really liked this picture when I first looked at it because Puck is my favorite character in the play. I think he's mischievous and different than the rest of the characters and that's what makes him so special. This picture really shows what he can do and how valuable he is to the story. He brings a new light that none of the other characters bring and that's why a lot of people may find him to be the most interesting. He shows us that although many different things can be going on in someone's life, it's important to always make time for fun and that bringing something exciting or different into someone else’ life can benefit them. 

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WAS SHAKESPEARE GAY? SONNET 20 AND THE POLITICS OF PEDAGOGY~Historical Article~

WAS SHAKESPEARE GAY? SONNET 20 AND THE POLITICS OF PEDAGOGY~Historical Article~ | Katie's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

CHARLES, CASEY. "Was Shakespeare Gay? Sonnet 20 And The Politics Of Pedagogy." College Literature 25.3 (1998): 35. Literary Reference Center. Web. 3 Feb. 2013.

katie McMullin's insight:

The following article demonstrates the common misconception of William Shakespeare's sexuality. Most students studying the artist assume Shakespeare was gay, based on the constant usage of both male and female characters in his plays and sonnets, but, truthfully, these accusations have never been confirmed. The article also talks about how people had difficulty identifying themselves as gay or straight. The term "gay" itself was never used back then and men who were, essentially, gay never grouped themselves in a specific category because what they believed they were wasn't unusual for the time period. Shakespeare not only used mature, sexual content between both males and females, in plays such as "Romeo and Juliet", he also incorporated some male-on-male action in sonnet 20. "A man in hue all hues in his controlling, which steals men's eyes and women's souls amazeth." The play "A Midsummer Night’s Dream" was one of the many plays written by Shakespeare which emphasized the meaning of love between males and females. It also illustrates the role of women in society and how they weren't really respected. However, Shakespeare himself had two girls who he cared about a lot and from what history tells us, he respected them and their decisions. Therefore, although Shakespeare has been said to be gay or homosexual, "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is one of his many plays where he shows his utmost respect for women, by allowing them to have a key role in the play, even though the characters were acted out by men. It appears that Shakespeare was very unsure of himself and his sexuality, based on the literature he wrote, but he was wise beyond his time and he went against society, not only on a potentially personal level, but also a professional level, considering being gay wasn't looked highly upon. Either way, gay or straight, Shakespeare is still, and always will be one of the greatest writers of all time.

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Matthew Ethier's comment, February 6, 2013 8:10 AM
Very good anylisis Foofy!
Allison Mosichuk's comment, March 12, 2013 8:14 PM
I really like this article! Is there a reason you chose article over all of the other articles?
katie McMullin's comment, March 13, 2013 9:46 PM
I just really liked it!! Haha.. It was interesting and anything about Shakespeare himself always left me curious considering he lived hundreds of years ago! :)
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A Literary Criticism of "A Midsummer Night's Dream"~Literary Criticism~

A Literary Criticism of "A Midsummer Night's Dream"~Literary Criticism~ | Katie's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

Kerr, Calum A. "Literary Contexts In Plays: William Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Literary Contexts In Plays: William Shakespeare's 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' (2008): 1. Literary Reference Center. Web. 21 Feb. 2013.

katie McMullin's insight:

This article examines the obscurity and origionality of the play "A Midsummer Night's Dream", using specific examples from the text. It incorperates different parts of particular acts and scenes from the play to prove the point that there are, in fact, some arguable cases to be made. Towards the end of the document, the author includes some further feedback, relating to the story as a whole. The review talks about the similarities between "Romeo and Juliet", another famous Shakespearean novel, and "A Midsummer Night's Dream". It even refers to the surroundings described in the play and how they may appear misleading in relation to what was occuring between the characters. This literary criticism points out exactly what could potentially draw viewers away from the play and depicts certain faults Shakespeare may have encountered when creating "A Midsummer Night's Dream". It also points out major advantages to the play and what Shakespeare did well when constructing the piece, futher enhancing his point. The author of the literary criticism doesn't really say what position he takes reguarding whether he liked the play or not, but aside from that, this article is very interesting and knowlegable for people who either like or dislike the play. 

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katie McMullin's comment, March 13, 2013 9:44 PM
sorry!! It didn't do anything. It didn't have a specific opinion. It's the last sentence in the inside
katie McMullin's comment, March 13, 2013 9:44 PM
sorry!! It didn't do anything. It didn't have a specific opinion. It's the last sentence in the inside
katie McMullin's comment, March 13, 2013 9:44 PM
*insite
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Hermia in "A Midsummer Night's Dream"~Source~

Hermia in "A Midsummer Night's Dream"~Source~ | Katie's Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it

FINDLAY, ALISON. "Hermia." Women In Shakespeare (2010): 185-186. Literary Reference Center. Web. 13 Feb. 2013.

katie McMullin's insight:

In this article, Hermia is described as a tough, hard-headed woman who stands up for herself and doesn't let others walk all over her. Its strange how in "A Midsummer Night's Dream," she is portrayed a little differently then what the document states her as. It also mentions that she's closely linked to the Greek God Hermes, God of mischief and trickery. It's odd how Shakespeare used the name of a mischievous creature for a character seemingly nice and respectable. It almost seems as though Helena, Hermia's best friend in the play, should switch names with her, which was a creative idea on Shakespeare's part. In my opinion, it seems as though Hermia tries her best to be a kind, genuine person who attempts to do what she thinks is best for her and the people she's surrounded with. She also appears to be a rather logical person who doesn't care what other people think. It is evident that she knows she cant please everyone, but I wouldn't say that's a bad thing, if anything, it shows that she's a very strong person who can do things on her own which was practically unheard of in the Elizabethan time period. Back in this time era, women weren't treated with much respect, but the fact that Hermia seems to demand respect from her father to marry Lysander without his consent shows true character and confidence. The fact that Hermia is a strong women in the play doesn't come accross as a bad thing, it just confirms that even people who are seen as underpriveleged or "less than" the common folk can still prove others wrong and become active within society, which is an admirable trait, especially with women.   

   

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