Karankawa
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The Karankawa Indians

The Karankawa Indians | Karankawa | Scoop.it
Student made video about the tribe that inhabited the Texas Gulf Coast.
Meredith Johnston's insight:

A great presentation by a highschool student.  Be sure to read the captions as well as listen.

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KARANKAWA INDIANS | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA)

KARANKAWA INDIANS | The Handbook of Texas Online| Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) | Karankawa | Scoop.it
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The Karankawa Indians

The Karankawa Indians | Karankawa | Scoop.it

The Karankawa used a crude canoe, commonly known as a Dugout, to travel by water. They would take a large tree trunk,about twenty feet long and hollow it out. The Indians used a crude tool called a Adze to hollow out their Conoes.The Indians would take hot coals and place them on top of the tree trunk, then taking the Adze they would hollow it out. They propelled themselves, in their dugouts, by hand or erected a crude sail out of animal skins.


Via Deborah Valdez
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The Cannibals' Tea

The Cannibals' Tea | Karankawa | Scoop.it
The Karankawas of the Texas coast get a bad rap regarding cannibalism.
 
While they did...

Via Maridel Martinez
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Maridel Martinez's curator insight, June 2, 2013 1:21 AM

and in Texas too!

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Karankawa Indians

Karankawa Indians | Karankawa | Scoop.it

During the summers in Texas, fish moved back into deep water off shore in the Gulf where the Karankawa could not reach them. The oysters and clams are not safe to eat in hot weather. So, to find food the Karankawa would break up into smaller groups or bands and go inland to hunt and gather. In the summer there are lots of berries and edible plants and plant roots. Early accounts tell that the Karankawa seem to like a certain root that grew in shallow water. They would wade into the shallow water and collect lots of these roots. No one nowadays is really sure just what plant these roots came from. There are also deer, rabbits, turtles, turkeys and other edible animals. Sometimes food was hard to find and they went hungry for days at a time.

The Karankawa are all gone now. They disappeared sometime in the early 1800s. In 1840 only about 100 Karankawas were left. By 1850 they were gone.


Via Deborah Valdez
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