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Rescooped by Lisa Kimmerling from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Wiley: The Molecular Life of Plants

Wiley: The Molecular Life of Plants | Kaleidomicroscopic | Scoop.it

I've got a copy of this on my desk - it's very nice!

Several people have asked, "Is this the new edition of  Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plants?" - no, this is an undergraduate textbook that surveys plant processes from germination to senescence and reproduction - same Russell Jones, different book.

BMBP ed 2 should be out next year (http://www.aspb.org/publications/biotext/)


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Lisa Kimmerling from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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Introducing Microgreens: Younger, And Maybe More Nutritious, Vegetables

Introducing Microgreens: Younger, And Maybe More Nutritious, Vegetables | Kaleidomicroscopic | Scoop.it

Researchers have conducted the first scientific analysis of nutrients in trendy seedlings known as microgreens. They found that most microgreens have higher levels of nutrients than their mature counterparts.

 

The researchers looked at four groups of vitamins and other phytochemicals – including vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta carotene — in 25 varieties of microgreens. They found that leaves from almost all of the microgreens had four to six times more nutrients than the mature leaves of the same plant. But there was variation among them – red cabbage was highest in vitamin C, for instance, while the green daikon radish microgreens had the most vitamin E.


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Rescooped by Lisa Kimmerling from The Integral Landscape Café
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Interesting call for papers: Ecopoetics

Interesting call for papers: Ecopoetics | Kaleidomicroscopic | Scoop.it
Call for Papers: Conference on Ecopoetics February 22-24, 2013 University of California, Berkeley (Berkeley, CA) Contact and submissions e-mail: ecopoetics.conference@gmail.com Deadline for panel a...

Via Anne Caspari
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Rescooped by Lisa Kimmerling from Nature Therapy
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Walk in the park might improve cognition in depressed individuals

Walk in the park might improve cognition in depressed individuals | Kaleidomicroscopic | Scoop.it

Researchers from Baycrest’s Rotman Research Institute in Toronto, the University of Michigan and Stanford University teamed up for a study that suggests that when paired with therapy, nature walks have positive cognitive benefits for individuals struggling with major depression.


Via Josué Cardona
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nancercize's comment, December 14, 2012 10:02 AM
This is a major finding, in my opinion. We should try this before pills.
Rescooped by Lisa Kimmerling from Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo
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Shamanic Illuminations an exhibition of the Art of Pablo Amaringo, Alex Grey, and Mieshie

Shamanic Illuminations an exhibition of the Art of Pablo Amaringo, Alex Grey, and Mieshie | Kaleidomicroscopic | Scoop.it

Shamanic Illuminations an exhibition of the Art of Pablo Amaringo, Alex Grey, and Mieshiel at the ACA Galleries NYC September - October 2011

 

www.ayahuascavisions.com


Via Ayahuasca & Visionary Art
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Rescooped by Lisa Kimmerling from Ayahuasca Visions of Pablo Amaringo
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Shamanic Illuminations an exhibition of the Art of Pablo Amaringo, Alex Grey, and Mieshie

Shamanic Illuminations an exhibition of the Art of Pablo Amaringo, Alex Grey, and Mieshie | Kaleidomicroscopic | Scoop.it

Shamanic Illuminations an exhibition of the Art of Pablo Amaringo, Alex Grey, and Mieshiel at the ACA Galleries NYC September - October 2011

 

www.ayahuascavisions.com


Via Ayahuasca & Visionary Art
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Rescooped by Lisa Kimmerling from ayahuasca
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Do trees communicate?

Suzanne Simard, The University of British Columbia
A forest ecologist explains how an underground network of fungi connects "mother trees" and plants together and shuttles resources, allowing trees to help one another survive and thrive.


Via Jerónimo M.M.
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Yamuna Flaherty's comment, May 17, 2013 10:02 PM
This is amazing!
Scooped by Lisa Kimmerling
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Americans Toss Out As Much As 40% of Their Food, Study Says : The Permaculture Project LLC

Americans Toss Out As Much As 40% of Their Food, Study Says : The Permaculture Project LLC | Kaleidomicroscopic | Scoop.it
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Rescooped by Lisa Kimmerling from Amazing Science
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DNA-damaging E. Coli Strain Causing Inflammatory Bowel Disease Linked to Cancer in Mice

DNA-damaging E. Coli Strain Causing Inflammatory Bowel Disease Linked to Cancer in Mice | Kaleidomicroscopic | Scoop.it

The trillions of microbes in the human gut contribute to obesity and to the risk of diseases such as diabetes. This microbial menagerie — the microbiome — also has a role now in cancer. Mice with inflammatory bowel disease contain higher proportions of toxin-producing bacteria that may lead to colorectal cancer, the researchers say. Moreover, people with colorectal cancer were found to be more likely than healthy people to harbour these bacteria. Researchers have known for decades that microbes can cause cancer. Many viruses turn infected cells cancerous as means of spreading their genetic material.The pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori lies at the root of most of peptic ulcers, which can seed stomach cancers. The latest work, however, indicates that an ordinarily harmless strain of Escherichia coli, a common gut bacterium, can cause cancer when the gut is inflamed.

 

Many humans also harbour bacteria that produce colibactin. The researchers found them in the stools of 20% of 24 healthy people, 40% of 35 people with inflammatory bowel disease and 66% of 21 people with colorectal cancer. But how the colibactin-producing bacteria lead to cancer isn’t clear. Gut inflammation causes colibactin-producing strains to bloom while simultaneously weakening epithelial cells that line the gut, making them more susceptible to DNA damage. If this happens for long enough, a cell will turn cancerous.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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