K.G. Taratuta's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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K.G. Taratuta's A Midsummer Night's Dream
The influences the world had on Shakespeare
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EBSCOhost: Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream Literary Criticism

EBSCOhost: Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream Literary Criticism | K.G. Taratuta's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Kevin G Taratuta's insight:

An insightful criticism that covers everything from Nick Bottom's song, THe Names of the Faires, to the very Dialouge choosen by William Shakespeare.

 

 

Evans, G. Blakemore, et al., eds. The Riverside Shakespeare. Boston: Houghton, 1972.

Ruskin, John. Love's Meine. Ed. E. T. Cook and Alexander Wedderbum. London: George Allen. Vol. 25 of The Works of John Ruskin. 39 vols. 1904-1912.

White, Gilbert. The Natural History of Selbourne. London: J. M. Dent, 1906.

 

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By DAVID-EVERETT BLYTHE, Thomas More College

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Brian Rowe's comment, March 11, 2013 8:18 AM
I really enjoyed when you presented this information! Very inspiring!
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EBSCOhost: "When Blood Is Their Argument": Shakespeare on War, Freedom, and the Nature...

EBSCOhost: "When Blood Is Their Argument": Shakespeare on War, Freedom, and the Nature... | K.G. Taratuta's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Kevin G Taratuta's insight:

The Elizabethan era was not just a historic time for England's literature, it was also a time of war and Shakespeare lived in the middle of it all. This article focuses on theories of how the time of war could have influenced Shakespeares writing. England during this time period went to war with the Irish, the Spanish, and the Armidians all of them were long and bloody that changed England and her people. As the common English man was influenced by the wars so was Shakespeare, he often mimicked the themes of war and the emotion it birngs out of his plays, like rage which is found in Romeo & Juliet between Tybalt and Romeo and even in A Midsummer Nights Dream where Demetrious and Lysander plan to duel eachother for Helena's love. Shakespreare also wrote about violent events in history like his plays King Henry V and Julius Caesar both storys based on wars. This article gives the idea that Shakespeare did not like war but he also saw it's uses and inspirations for great stories. 

 

 

Adorno, Theodor. 1997. Aesthetic Theory. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Heinemann, Margot. 1991. “‘Demystifying the Mystery of State’: King Lear and the
World Upside Down.” Shakespeare Survey. Vol. 44, Shakespeare and Politics. Ed.
Stanley Wells. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Cambridge Collections
Online. doi:10.1017/CCOL0521413567
Shakespeare, William. 1997. The Riverside Shakespeare. Ed. G. Blakemore Evans. New
York: Houghton Mifflin.
Taylor, Mark. 2002. Shakespeare’s Imitations. Newark: University of Delawar

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Brian Rowe's comment, February 13, 2013 7:56 AM
I am enlightened. This has brought a tear to my eye. Gold star.
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EBSCOhost-Book of Theseus

EBSCOhost-Book of Theseus | K.G. Taratuta's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Kevin G Taratuta's insight:

This article reveals the shocking stroy that Shakespeare may have stolen more than "Pyramus & Thisbe" for A Midsummer Night's Dream. The Great Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio wrote the epic poem The Book of Theseus over two-hundred before Shakespeare even considered being a playwright. The article reveals the contents of Boccaccio's epic poem, which tells the story of Theseus after he kills the Minoaur and returns to Athens. The young hero is crowned King of Athens and he inevitably ends up fighting a war with the Scythians (A.K.A. the Amazons) and forces their Queen, Hippolyta to maryy him and unite Scythia and Athens. Shakesperae didn't take just character names from Boccaccio he also took part of his plot. Two Greeks aprroach Theseus named Acrites and Palemon, they both wish to marry Hippolyta's sister Emilia and they ask their king to judge who can marry her. The real problem is that Emilia loves Acrites and loathes Palemon, to make matters worse Theseus declares the two will fight each other and the winner will take Emilia. The final thing Skaespeare robbed from Boccaccio is intervention from Divine powers, only instead of the troublesome fairie monarchs it is the Roman gods Mars and Venus who cause trouble. Mars favors Acrites and Mars' lover Venus favors Palemon so of course the battle is not a fair fight with the two gods using their powers to influence Acrites and Palemon. It is ironic that Boccaccio wrote the story first and no one wanted to hear this story but Shakespeare writes the same one with a few tweaks and everyone wanted to hear his version.   

 

Cottrell, Alan. "The Book Of Theseus." Masterplots, Fourth Edition(2010): 1-4. Literary Reference Center. Web. 6 Feb. 2013.

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Brian Rowe's comment, February 6, 2013 1:51 PM
Wow. This is gold.
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A Midsummer Night's Dream: Titania and Nick Bottom

A Midsummer Night's Dream: Titania and Nick Bottom | K.G. Taratuta's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
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Sows the affection she feels for Nick Bottom despite him being part donkey.

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Sir Jake DeCelles's comment, March 10, 2013 5:12 PM
This affection is quite intriguing.
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Mickey Mouse - Midsummer Night's Dream

Kevin G Taratuta's insight:

This varient of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream is portrayed using the famous disney characters featuring Mickie Mouse as Lysander, Minnie Mouse as Hermia, Donald Duck as Demetrious, Daisy Duck as Helena, Goofy as Puck, Ludwig Von Drake as Theseus, and Scrooge Mcduck as Eugeus. The dialouge does contain the original Shakespearean lines although it is quickly followed with a modern translation.

 

 

First television showing : September 25, 1999 Mickey, Minnie, Donald and Daisy compete in Shakespeare's tale of mismatched lovers and a special love potion.

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