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Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Story as a path to transformative leadership & business success    www.juststoryit.com  619-235-0052
Curated by Karen Dietz

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Look up, Connect and Share A Story--video

My daughter shared this emotionally powerful video with me, and it made me reflect on how we as salespeople waste so much time in sales cycles, because we're...
Karen Dietz's insight:

The other night my husband Tim and I were out to dinner. At the table next to us was a teenage boy with his mom and dad. The kid was totally engaged in his meal and having a good time gobbling up the food. No phone or iPad for him!


His parents though? They spent the entire meal on their phones checking email and texting. They never once said a word to their son. You could tell the boy was used to it and was entertaining himself in their absence. Tim and I just shook our heads.


If ever there was a strong case for putting down the phone and connecting with others -- and swapping stories back and forth -- it's this video. I loved it and it really got me thinking. I think you will enjoy it too. It's a great reminder to stop, talk, and share stories.


It's OK if I'm not tethered to my cell. When work is done I can ignore it and my iPad to share the story of my day with my husband -- and listen to his in return :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Computer generated stories? Turns out it's like really, really hard

Computer generated stories? Turns out it's  like really, really hard | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Researchers at Australia's University of New South Wales recently designed the Moral Storytelling System, a computer program that forgoes all the messy human parts of writing a story to bring you undiluted, AI-generated narratives.
However, the Moral Storytelling System, or MOSS, focuses exclusively on fables, because less straightforward storytelling remains still too complex for artificial intelligence. Developer of the ...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Whew! It looks like us business storytellers won't be totally replaced by a computer anytime soon. Dodged that bullet for now.


This is a quick post perfect for a Friday. It talks about the attempts to create a Moral Storytelling System (MOSS) -- and its failures to actually come up with a decent story. 


The program focuses on fables first and a sample is included -- that's quite sorry (yeah!).  Turns out storytelling is quite a complex skill to master. And very difficult for a computer to emulate.


But the vision for storytelling's future shared here gives us pause -- computers will make meaningful contributions to literature within the decade...and the computer will definitely be doing some of the work of writing.


Hmmm -- what do you think?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Interactive narrative marketing with Snapchat Stories

Interactive narrative marketing with Snapchat Stories | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Coca-Cola, Taco Bell and Victoria’s Secret are some of the first brands to test out Snapchat Stories as the social messaging application steps up its marketing potential. 

Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is an article about some innovative ways companies are using Snapchat for delivering stories now that the platform has added video and text message chatting.


No question -- doing this kind of storytelling takes planning and time. Maybe you can do it on the fly but I'd want to think through a strategy first. The examples in this article will get you started.


Bottom line -- there are so many ways for companies to share their stories! Figure out what technologies/channels work for you. Maybe Snapchat is a powerful medium for you.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Wendy Flanagan's curator insight, May 8, 8:16 AM

Kids are wild about Snapchat - will adults join in?

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Michael Bay's Epic Fail : What to do instead (hint: storytelling)

Michael Bay's Epic Fail : What to do instead (hint: storytelling) | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Michael Bay blanked out during his Samsung presentation at the CES conference in Vegas. A teleprompter issue had him at a loss for words and walking off stage.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Michael Bay's presentation disaster has been making the rounds for days now. Here's a SlideShare piece with advice for how to avoid something similar in your life.


I like most of the points made here -- especially 'know your stuff' and the insights about a presentation not being about perfection.


The point I disagree with is practicing in front of a mirror. Why? Because storytelling is practiced with a trusted listening partner.  


In the end, if Michael had actually prepared his presentation as a story several things would have happened:

  1. He would have remembered all of his points
  2. He wouldn't have needed to rely on technology or a teleprompter to deliver his talk.


I can tell story was never part of his presentation -- I bet it was just a bunch of boring facts and figures. Which is why he got flustered and walked off stage saying he couldn't remember what he was supposed to say.


Never ever let this happen to you. Craft your presentation as a story! You'll will not have to worry about technology failing. And you will always win the day.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

 

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Memloom: A New Way To Tell Stories

Memloom: A New Way To Tell Stories | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Memloom, a new startup launching today, is looking to find a niche somewhere in between blogging and photo-printing services, like those provided by..
Karen Dietz's insight:

This new technology looks pretty interesting and I did sign up for it. Now I'm just waiting to receive the invitation so I can play and test it out.


When working with photos, videos, etc. to tell a story, when you want to add text and audio, it can be clunky. Photos themselves don't tell a story following the traditional story arc -- they require context and a narrative to do that.


So maybe Memloom is the answer. Try it out or tuck it away for future reference. And let us know what you think!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Character Minutes's curator insight, January 9, 11:14 AM

Interesting  idea,  could use as a class project too!

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's curator insight, January 9, 11:31 AM

Is Memloom all that different from other digital storytelling tools?  I am hoping for a iPhone version where stories can be compiled on the fly, reflective of the chaos of real life.

corneja's curator insight, January 10, 5:27 PM

Memloon seems an easy tool for building stories for our photos. Could it will be used by brands? Maybe, I guess.

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Saving Storytelling in the age of the Smartphone

Saving Storytelling in the age of the Smartphone | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
“I am going to be a little boring,” Sherry Turkle announces as we sit down to tea in the living room of her sprawling Boston townhouse.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This article makes me both sad and more committed to storytelling than ever before. The author, Meg Garber, is talking with and about Sherry Turkle, the writer of the book Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less From Each Other, and working on her next book Reclaiming Conversation.


The article is about how we are so focused on the screens in front of us that we are sacrificing actually talking with each other. Where does storytelling go, along with its benefits of building empathy, relationship, context, meaning, wisdom, imagination, inspiration, passion, purpose, creativity, etc.)? Down the tubes, I'm afraid.


This phenomenon is prevalent in the US today. This is a consequence of technology that I don't think is such a great outcome. The article is a fascinating discussion of what is happening today and well worth the read.


So my resolve to engage in more storytelling through face-to-face conversations just ramped up today. Because this also provides significant business benefits.


How about you? 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Character Minutes's curator insight, January 9, 11:16 AM

Lots of ideas inside  article

Paul Dixon's curator insight, February 3, 11:13 PM

There is nothing more enjoyerable then a good rabbit with friends, or talking to a new person finding out about THEM, not telling them how great we are. Nature gave us two ears and one mouth!

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Presentations: A Throwable Microphone To Get The Audience Sharing

Presentations: A Throwable Microphone To Get The Audience Sharing | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Throw the mic in the air like you just don't care. Catchbox is a new throwable microphone designed to liven up audience participation, and in turn reduce the..
Karen Dietz's insight:

This article falls into the realm of tools for presentations and that can help us in our work.


When we are sharing stories in presentations, it often sparks a story in the minds of your listeners. Now comes along a throwable microphone so you can quickly have audiences share the stories (or comments/feedback) they'd like to share with you.


No more awkward pauses until someone is handed a mic. No more logistics nightmares when it comes to audience participation. No more asking folks to 'speak up' because we can't hear them -- even in small group settings.


And it's fun! I often use a soft ball that we can throw around the room to designate who gets to speak next. I love the idea of this also being a microphone that we can throw like a ball.


Check it out -- it sounds really cool!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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The ‘Visual Revolution’ is here: How one startup wants to help brands become better storytellers

The ‘Visual Revolution’ is here: How one startup wants to help brands become better storytellers | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
There's an old adage that says a picture is worth a thousand words. In today's society, everyone is a storyteller, but not just about their lives, but about the brands and products ...
Karen Dietz's insight:

OK -- I haven't tried this service but I think you should know about it. This is an article by Ken Yeung reviewing tech company Chute. Chute offers a way to help companies tell their stories visually.


Here's what caught my interest: "Every image tells a story, but we’re beginning to see trillions: trillions of images, trillions of stories, trillions of Instagram moments — but no narrative. What’s missing is the care and curation that makes stories great. This is every brand’s greatest opportunity" says one of the founders of the company.


As Yeung states, the company was started by serial entrepreneurs Ranvir Gujral and Gregarious Narain, Chute has a goal to help brands create “powerful stories” with its technology. "...the emphasis isn’t on working with a specific set of tools to get the story told, but how these tools work around the story. Their technology aims to put brands back in touch with their customers."


I find all of this interesting because it shows that folks are finally waking up to the notion that visuals across platforms do need to be coordinated in order to tell a story. Otherwise it's just disjointed stuff. Whether Chute is the answer, or some other company is, remains to be seen. Or maybe just being conscious of creating a coherent story with images is enough and we don't need technology to help us. I don't have any answers -- but it's an important development to watch.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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7 Great iPad Apps for Creating Comic Strips for Biz Stories

7 Great iPad Apps for Creating Comic Strips for Biz Stories | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

The art of comic creation is one of the best representation of creativity at work. As teachers and educators, we can use the power and versatility of iPad to cultivate a creative culture within our classes and among our students through helping them tinker with and design comics. Here is a list of some great iPad apps you can use for this purpose...


Via Baiba Svenca
Karen Dietz's insight:

What fun! Looking for a creative way to share your business stories? Try turning them into a comic book.


Here is a list of apps (I found this on fellow curator @Baiba Svenca's 
 Digital Presentations in Education scoop.it) for the iPad to help you do this.


For folks like me who's drawing skills are at the level of stick figures, it looks like the first 3 on the list are the best. Some of the other tools require actual drawing/sketching skills.


Hope you have fun playing with these :))


This was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, November 5, 2013 2:18 PM

How much fun is this!  Whether you're an individual or an organization, you can make use of these tools to tell your story.

LundTechIntegration's curator insight, November 5, 2013 4:50 PM

Great resources for CCSS

Susan Connor's curator insight, November 21, 2013 5:50 PM

Comic Strips... who would have thought

 

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Singapore, Kindness and a Story Game-A Biz Can Do This Too!

Singapore, Kindness and a Story Game-A Biz Can Do This Too! | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Kindness is in everyone. The Singapore Kindness Movement (SKM) wants to encourage everyone to start, show and share kindness.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Right on the heels of the last article I curated about the future of storytelling comes this article about how the Singapore Kindness Movement is using a storytelling app that's a game. The purpose is to promote being kind, gracious and friendly in communal spaces.


This is exactly wha the Wild (?) Future of Storytelling article was mentioning: stories will make the world a better place.


This is a very short article but delightful. The stories in the app are based on fairy tales. And each story is interactive.  Sounds like fun.


For businesses, it begs the question about how you want to use stories, and in what innovative ways can you do so? Would it fit with your Vision/Purpose to create a story app in a similar vein to Singapore's app? Hmmmm.


Many thanks to colleague Evelyn Clark @corpstory for pointing me to this post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Alessandro Rea's curator insight, October 17, 2013 2:10 AM

SINGAPORE, 7 March 2013 – Students and parents will have something to look forward to this term break as the Singapore Kindness Movement (SKM) announced today the launch of its first mobile game application, Kindly Ever After. Through a series of tightly-woven storylines, players are reminded of the importance of being kind, gracious and friendly in communal spaces.

 

Held at Orchard Xchange, the launch attracted lively participation of commuters, many of whom were working adults and students. Despite the morning rush, commuters stopped by the Kindly Ever After game counter to try out the game.

 

Kindly Ever After is the brainchild of four students from the Singapore Polytechnic. With Diploma in Games Design & Development, Tng Bing Rong, 19, Chng Yang Da, 19, Jack Kew Zi Jian, 19, and Shawn Cheah Chenxuan, 19, drew inspiration from the timeless closing phrase, “happily ever after”, in fairy tales.  The game features four animated stories that are real-life depictions of ungracious acts often seen onboard public transport, at hawker centres, on public roads, and in cyber spaces. Players will first be engaged in the tales of graciousness before embarking on their quest to eradicate ungracious acts committed by characters in the game.

 

In each stage, the player will have to “fire” the kind spirit towards the unkind spirit to transform the latter into a kind soul. As the game progresses, obstacles get increasingly challenging at each level. The aim is to transform unkind spirits into kindhearted souls to create a friendly and gracious environment.

 

Read More: http://kindness.sg/blog/2013/03/07/kindly-ever-after-a-fairy-tale-of-graciousness-to-come-true/#.Ul-pM5ROrEz

malek's curator insight, October 17, 2013 4:23 AM

Karen Dietz keeps hammering this fact:  our product, idea, or personal brand, is dead on arrival.Without a compelling story. Here's another inspiring example from Singapore

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An App To Help The Government Stop Street Harassment via Storytelling

An App To Help The Government Stop Street Harassment via Storytelling | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The Hollaback app has long helped women document the abuse they get on city streets. Now it goes a step farther automatically creating a government...
Karen Dietz's insight:

I find this app and article (authored by Sydney Brownstone) fascinating for a couple of reasons. First, the founders of the app talk openly about street harassment storytelling as a vehicle to stop unwanted/undesirable social behavior.


As the article explains, if you are harassed on the streets of New York City you can use the app to immediately report the incident to city council members and related agencies. And part of the report you file with the app is "your story" about what happened. Wow! The whole piece is ingenious.


Read the article to understand all the implications here.


But here's another way this app and article fascinates me -- it's about a company (ihollaback.org) embedding storytelling directly into their product/service. It is not an add-on or afterthought. Given the nature of what the app is targeting, it would be silly to quibble if stories are actually being shared through this app, or if it is more information. I like that they are actively using the words story and storytelling as a way to capture people's experience. So bravo.


The question for reader is: how can you bring story and storytelling more direclty into the products/services you offer? Maybe this article will spark some ideas.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Tony Gough's curator insight, September 3, 2013 3:50 AM

An app that may help women on holiday or working in cities.

Karen Dietz's comment, September 4, 2013 12:12 PM
Thank you Malek, Kati and Tony for your comments. I really hope this app travels to other cities. I think it could really make a difference. And the storytelling aspect of the app really will help city officials understand the context of the harassment -- which is something numbers can never do.
malek's comment, September 11, 8:50 AM
an interesting topic..keep on going
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How Stories are Changing: Why Living in the Present Is a Disorder

How Stories are Changing: Why Living in the Present Is a Disorder | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"R.U. Sirius: You describe five symptoms — pathologies, really — of “presentist” culture. One of these is “narrative collapse.” Can you explain it for those who haven’t read the book?


Douglas Rushkoff: Narrative Collapse is what happens when we no longer have time in which to tell a story."

 

[Image: HBO]


Via Gregg Morris
Karen Dietz's insight:

ooooh, ooooh, ooooh -- here's a piece about storytelling, technology, and 'presentism' that will get you thinking.


Are we experienceing 'narrative collapse'? This is an interivew with Douglas Rushkoff, author of Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now. Rushkoff makes the case that our daily and moment-by-moment interactions with technology are leading to us being always in the present where everything demands our attention and where we are caught up in responding immediately (I probably stated that poorly, but you get the idea).


He goes on to say that this tyranny has some good aspects, and some not so good results. One of them is that our stories are changing.


Over the last few years, when people say to me that storytelling is changing -- that digital storytelling and transmedia storytelling is radically altering stories -- I seriously question the supposition.


Rushkoff is the first one who is making sense about this, and it is the first time that I can say, "Sure, this is happening."


Narrative collapse is when video games and role playing fantasies keep a story going without ever ending it. There is no conclusion. And TV shows are becoming similar -- where there is no conclusion, there is no real protagonist, and the story line is not building to a climax. Think Game of Thrones or Once Upon A Time. Lots of mini-climaxes and cliff-hangers, but resolution never ever comes. For me it's exhausting and I've stopped watching shows like that.


But there are other points Rushkoff makes about story shifting away from finalizing victories into sustainable experiences. Hmmmm -- you'll have to read the article yourself to form your own opinion. For sure, he presents a very balanced view about "presentism" and narratives chaning, pointing out advantages and disadvantages of both.


For myself, I am much more optimistic. Yes, technology is reshaping how we live. And I think it is also reshaping our brain. But when I canvas the whole of the human experience, I still see stories -- and the human dynamics of storytelling in all their glory -- alive and well.


I still love how this article makes me pause and reflect. There is more to this article too about oppression, dropping out, the difficulty in managing multiple realities, etc. What do YOU think about all of this?


Many thanks to fellow curator Gregg Morris for finding and sharing this!

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Justine Pardoen's comment, April 19, 2013 3:36 PM
Reading the book is worthwhile!
Karen Dietz's comment, April 24, 2013 3:51 PM
Good to know Justine!
Curated by Karen Dietz
Karen is available for workshops, coaching, public speaking & consulting on telling your story, making values/vision come alive, uniting people to achieve audacious goals, & building transformative leadership. Remember, whoever tells the best story wins!