Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Growing leader's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com
Curated by Karen Dietz
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Spoiler alert! Do spoilers make you enjoy stories more?

Spoiler alert! Do spoilers make you enjoy stories more? | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Did someone spoil the next episode of "Game of Thrones"? They might have done you a favor.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Just yesterday a client asked a question about good storytelling and spoiler alerts. Does sharing the end of a story always reduce our enjoyment of it?

 

For the latest research, check out this post. The article explains what the scientists found out about spoilers. And you will be surprised.

 

Their discoveries make sense. I won't spoil it for you by telling you the answer. Go check out the article and let me know what you think.

 

Do you agree with the research?

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Robots get a crash course in humanity by interpreting stories

Robots get a crash course in humanity by interpreting stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
As it turns out, the key to crafting intelligent machines that won’t go rogue and slaughter us all might be some very thoughtful storytelling. Mark Riedl and Brent Harrison from Georgia Tech are trying to mold the way artificial intelligences wrap their incorporeal heads around human ethics by feeding them stories, and rewarding them for
Karen Dietz's insight:

"Gotta love this -- artificial intelligence devices are now reading stories in order to get trained to behave well in human societies.


This is the latest project and research from Georgia Tech scientists mark Riedl and Brent Harrison. It's fascinating. Read what these two have been up to and the great strides they are making.


The famous anthropologist Gregory Bateson told a story in the 1970s that goes like this:

A man wanted to know about mind -- not in nature, but in his large private computer. He asked it (no doubt in his best Fortran), "Do you compute that you will ever think like a human being?" The machine then set to work. Finally the computer printed out an answer. The man ran to get the paper and found, neatly typed, the words: "That reminds me of a story..." (Steps to An Ecology Of Mind, 1979)


Looks like we may be getting there.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, February 16, 2016 1:19 AM

Wow, robots are learning one of the mostly human capacity, the story-telling...

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Research, Data, and Stories With No Ending: Fab Storytelling Tips

Research, Data, and Stories With No Ending: Fab Storytelling Tips | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Rigorous research and attention-grabbing storytelling are very different trades and it is clear there are professional and personal risks for academics looking to translate complex data into bite-s...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Having sat through various mind-numbing academic research papers at conferences over the years, I was thrilled to find this article about how storytelling can come to the rescue.


Now, as a business person -- why should you care? Because many of us will have to deal with data and research at some point in our careers -- even if it's just sales charts.


This post, written by Cheryl Brumley, has great tips for how to find relatable imagery in the research so anyone can grasp its significance.


Then she gives us a structure that will help anyone organize the research into a comprehensible story instead of complex mess.


Now here's a particular storytelling truth: not all of our stories have endings. Conclusions can't be reached, except to say "stay tuned" or "more to come". This is the exact dilemma for research storytelling where the ending is not about a conclusion, but about pointing out pathways for more research to be done. Brumley gives suggestions for how to wind up the story when you find yourself in this position.


Overall, this is another solid example of storytelling in a different arena (academics) and learning more about storytelling in different applications.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Prasanna's curator insight, March 21, 2015 8:30 PM

Excellent- research storytelling

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Latest Research On Effecitve Biz Story Endings

Latest Research On Effecitve Biz Story Endings | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Just another WordPress site
Karen Dietz's insight:

Kendall Haven, author of Story Proof: The Science Behind the Startling Power of Story recently wrote me about his latest research on business story endings.


It's way cool stuff. Bottom line: positive characters and positive endings are not as effective as we thought when desiring to shift behaviors.


Read the brief conversation between myself and Kendall, and then use the latest information to start crafting stories that will act as catalysts for change.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Digital Storytelling Evaluation Rubrics

Digital Storytelling Evaluation Rubrics | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Via José Carlos
Karen Dietz's insight:

I discovered this from fellow curator Jose and I thought you would find it both interesting and helpful.


The bane of storytellers and biz story professionals are decent evaluation tools. We have scant few. I'd say we don't have any at all, but I'm not aware of everything in the universe :)


How do you know a story is good? If you hear a less than compelling story, how do you know what's wrong?


The same is true for digital stories. And believe me, I view lots of digital stories and pass on most. Now I have some rubrics to help me tell you why.


Standard evaluation measures are essential -- they help build consistency and take evaluations out of the land of white-washing or personality contests.


These rubrics were developed for teachers, but any business can use them! I hope they help you as you craft your stories, and to know why a story (digital or otherwise) falls flat.


Until we have our own Roger & Ebert (so sad they are both gone now), we'll have to find rubrics where we can, eventually develop our own, and keep testing them out and refining them.

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ozziegontang's comment, April 10, 2013 11:12 AM
Here's a nice story from the word-detective: The Latin "rubrica" meant "red ochre" (a clay-like soil used in coloring) or red coloring itself, as used in makeup and dyes ("ruber" being the Latin word for "red").

One of the earliest uses of "rubric" in English, in the late 14th century, was in reference to the practice at the time of printing directions for the conduct of services, as well as other instructions and explanations, in red letters in religious texts. These sections of the text, designed to catch the eye and command the attention of worshipers, were known as "rubrics." This use eventually produced two other senses of "rubric," that of "an explanation or definition" and "a rule or custom of conduct."

The use of red ink to draw the reader's attention to important points was widespread in secular works as well, and "rubric" was applied to a chapter title or other heading in a book or manuscript printed in red. By the 19th century, this had produced the figurative meaning of "a designation or category"
Karen Dietz's comment, April 10, 2013 4:08 PM
Love the history of the word Ozzie! Thanks for sharing. And I knowing your metaphoric mind, yes, everything out of your mouth is a story :)
Karen Dietz's comment, April 11, 2013 11:46 AM
Thank you Ken, Cavett, and Jose for your comments! So glad you found it useful :) Have an awesome weekend.
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East Palo Alto adds personal touch to planning process by asking residents to tell their stories

East Palo Alto adds personal touch to planning process by asking residents to tell their stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
As they draft a new Comprehensive General Plan, East Palo Alto officials are collecting oral histories of residents — a process praised as a novel approach to…
Karen Dietz's insight:

Love this story! It's about a city using the power of storytelling to chart their future. Hooray!


Don't you wish more organizations -- whether businesses, nonprofits, or governments -- would do the same? I know everyone's experience would be much richer with better outcomes, too.


My only little criticism of the process the City of East Palo Alto is using are the questions they are asking. They are OK. But if they reaslly wanted stories they would be using story prompts to make sure they really heard stories. The questions they are now using will get them information or opinions and maybe not stories.


Instead of asking, "How do you make use of the city's parks?" they could ask, "Tell me about some of the best times you've had in the city's parks..."  The first question gets you information like, "We go picnicing, we use the playground, I like running in the park..."


If you ask the second question you actually get a very rich story that tells you more. "I really like to run in the park every morning. The scenery is beautiful and I like how the city replants its flowers each season so the park is constantly changing and pleasant to be in. I run with my buddies. It is easy to find parking and we can hang out at the picnic tables afterward."


You get the idea. We now have meaningful experiences to help guide decision-making about plant maintenance, parking facilities, places to congregate, etc. that we never would have gotten by asking the first information-based question.


So if you plan to do something similar in your organization, focus on the "Art of the Question" and investigate story prompts and the Appreciative Inquiry process for more help.


Many thanks to fellow curator Bill Palladino @LocalEconGuy for sending this article my way!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Tribe Pictures's curator insight, January 16, 2013 2:26 PM

Story telling makes for good city planning

Karen Dietz's comment, January 17, 2013 4:30 PM
It certainly does! And it is a much more rewarding experience for all involved.
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Consumers Hungry for Brand Stories

Consumers Hungry for Brand Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"An October 2012 survey by Edelman Berland and Adobe found that American consumers are looking for deeper brand engagement than banner ads and social media “like” buttons. 73% of the 1000 adults surveyed agreed with the statement, “Advertisements should tell a unique story, not just try to sell.”

 

Well, there can be no argument now about the case for business storytelling! At least as far as branding and marketing is concerned.


Enjoy the chart this research shows. I know I'll be using this in my work with clients!


Thanks to fellow curator Gregg Morris @greggvm and his Story and Narrative Scoop.it curation for finding this and sharing :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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When Good Storytelling Goes Bad - Biz Myth Busted!

When Good Storytelling Goes Bad  - Biz Myth Busted! | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

What we discovered was that neither the Yale nor the Harvard study actually exists. There is no evidence that the studies took place and no papers were ever published. Yet the "goal-setting to-money" study is a particularly imperishable business myth that has circulated for several decades. It persists despite sound debunking efforts on the part of entities such as Fast Company, which conducted an in-depth investigation of the myth in 1996.


Here's an interesting piece about phantom research, business mythology, and evaluating the research stories we hear.


It's a good and interesting read -- not so much about being skeptical, but questioning and thinking carefully about research that is presented to us, particularly when it is imbedded within a story.


No question -- it's a tricky dance. The best way to convey data is through a story -- doing so builds trust credibility, believability, and emotional connection. The easiest way to manipulate and skew research is through the stories you tell about it. 


What to do? Obviously for the teller it is to represent the research accurately.  In presentations when I talk about story research, I always offer the original research up for review for any listener who wants it.


For the listener, it's to check the research you hear about. Don't accept it unquestioningly. Ask for the original document.


Now go read the article to discover what popular biz myth was busted!

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Once upon a Time at the Office: Learning to Recognize, Interpret and Tell Stories in Organizations

Once upon a Time at the Office: Learning to Recognize, Interpret and Tell Stories in Organizations | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

This study investigates the use of narrative in organizations by (1) examining current organizational storytelling practices in a variety of industries and (2) identifying key features that characterize stories with powerful impact. Sixty survey respondents reported narrative is used by leaders to transfer knowledge, shape culture, and motivate or curtail employee behavior, as well as by employees to manage stress. Interviews with eight experts on narrative revealed, perhaps surprisingly, that skimping on details is what makes stories powerful.


Consider this post more a long-read but rich with great material. I love the bar charts about the findings, and the articulation of exactly what makes stories 'stick.'


The insights are all replicatable for your business.


Yes, this article is in academic-speak. But don't let that stop you. It's solid research that we can all use to help us get smarter about biz storytelling, and/or to storify to share with clients.


Good job!

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Karen Dietz's comment, March 11, 2012 9:19 PM
Glad you like this one too!
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Who's more attractive to women? Men Who Can Tell A Good Story

Who's more attractive to women? Men Who Can Tell A Good Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
If you're a man who tells good stories, congratulations. A new study says that your talent makes you more attractive in the eyes of women.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Ha ha ha ha!! How perfect for our Friday Fun. Guys, according to the latest research, if you want to get lucky with the ladies, you'd better be a good storyteller.

 

Well, this argument should clinch it for men in business and leadership roles. Now we know how to pitch our storytelling services :))

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Creativity, Innovation, and Storytelling For Business Success

Creativity, Innovation, and Storytelling For Business Success | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

“We're taught to think that all great minds think alike. While this may have worked during pre-21st century industrial times, this is no longer the case today”

Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here's a piece coming from the worlds of creativity and education about the necessity for storytelling -- but it is directly applicable to business.


As you read the article by Menno van DijkLaurie Kemp, whenever the words "education" or "school" are mentioned, simply substitute the word "business" and you'll get their points. 


The authors discuss research from the journal of Creativity And Innovation Management. The focus of the research was how storytelling skills build creativity and innovation abilities. There's even a link to the original research article that you can download for free.


And a business's competitive edge today is in creativity and innovation, right? In fact, that's the competitive edge for the US economy in the global marketplace.


The research focuses on storytelling in schools. But if it's good for students, it's good for business.


The take away? If you are in business of any size, training in storytelling could be a key to your sustainable future. If you are a consultant or coach, adding storytelling skills to your repertoire could keep your pipeline fed (but get trained in storytelling first, please).


Storytelling, creativity, innovation -- go forth and prosper!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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David Hain's curator insight, May 13, 2015 11:25 AM

We're hardwired for stories since cavemen. A 21c communication necessity for change, for sure!

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Participant Index--Finding Out Why 1 Film Spurs Action, While Another Doesn't

Participant Index--Finding Out Why 1 Film Spurs Action, While Another Doesn't | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
A film company, two foundations and a university want to know what motivates people to support an issue on social media after they see issue-oriented movies, TV shows or online video.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Now this is very interesting. We all know that our business stories are crafted to move people to action. But how does that happen really really, and how do you measure or evaluate it?


Here comes along Participant Media, an activist entertainment company to answer these vexing questions. They are developing a measuring tool to determine emotional response and level of engagement to films (stories).


There's still a way to go, but we should keep this on our radar screen for its application to business storytelling. Learn more about what's happening, the tool they are developing, and what's in store for us in the future by reading this post.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Patricia Stitson's curator insight, July 26, 2014 1:27 PM

Karen Dietz, you should take a look at the marketing anaylysis developed by Emotient using CERT technology.  I hear rumour that one of the founders might be talking at an upcoming TEDxAmericasFinestCity evnt ;-)

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6 case studies proving the results of content marketing (& storytelling)

6 case studies proving the results of content marketing (& storytelling) | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
In October 2012 Econsultancy ran a survey which found that 90% of brands felt that content marketing would become more important over the following 12 months.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Many people ask me what results business get when they focus on storytelling. Well, here are some impressive stats for you!


The focus of this article are the results that happen when businesses create content about their business that they then share with others. But we know what makes content so popular -- stories!!


When ever a company creates articles, blog posts, videos, infographics, SlideShare programs, etc., these are the places to share stories. In fact, if your content isn't a story, it's been shown to not do well.


A few of the corporate examples listed here used stories. Some of the others don't mention stories outright. But enough has been written by content creation/marketing gurus to know that storytelling is the key to success here.


If you craft great content -- and share your business stories and the stories of your customers in the process -- you too will probably be able achieve the results discussed here.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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LaraBadioli's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:09 AM

Secondo me tutti i sei casi hanno in comune:

 

- un cambiamento radicale che ha rivoluzionato il modo di pensare aziendale (partire da un nuovo punto di vista);

- uno sguardo interno sulle storie e vicissitudini che avrebbero messo in luce la loro attività (coscienza di sè);

- uno sguardo fuori per capire quali canali sono più ascoltati dal target di riferimento e da quelli da raggiungere;

- la produzione intensa di contentuti (es. 3 post a settimana generati dal blog, video, articoli commissionati);

- la pianificazione del feeding editoriale centellinata e calibrata per rendere l' onda di informazioni costante.

 

Il primo punto è quello più importante.

 

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Science & Stories: what every biz storyteller needs to know

Science & Stories: what every biz storyteller needs to know | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The thesis of this study – that storytelling skills gave an evolutionary advantage to our early ancestors – is an original perspective on human development, and in probing how this inheritance affects our modern lives, I draw on ...
Karen Dietz's insight:

In this latest research -- available as a downloadable e-book from the BiteSize science series -- we learn how stories were essential to our evolution. And still are.


And that science, scientists, and storytelling are intimately linked. Love that. And who knew there is a new discipline -- the psychology of narrative -- that's investigating all of that?


Read this article and e-book through the lense of business. Businesses evolve. Learning more about how stories support evolution -- or not -- would be wise to know about. Turns out metaphor is key.


The e-book is $2.99 on Amazon and I am adding it to my library (I have no affiliation with the author or publisher). And then make sure I use this material when working with physicians, engineers, and other science types.


I hope you enjoy this latest research. It sounds like it is written in plain language.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How alternative storytelling can help impact project evaluation

How alternative storytelling can help impact project evaluation | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Using digital technology to tell stories can help charities with impact assessment, says Kieron Kirkland...


Using stories to evaluate resultsQuantitatively??!! You bet!!

Here is a fabulous article after my quantitative heart.


The author Kieron Kirkland talks about how the organization, Nominet Trust, worked with the org story company Cognitive Edge to capture stories and then have the story authors rank what their stories are about on a scale.


Once the story was captured, there were several types of scales the storytellers ranked their stories on -- generating big data!


See -- storytelling and evaluation can be done effectively if constructed properly.


This article goes hand-in-hand with newer qualitative evaluation processes for arts-based techniques (like storytelling) talked about in one of my favorite books, Method Meets Art; Arts-Based Research Practice by Patricia Leavy (2009).


If you struggle to connect stories about your projects to quantifiable results, then run to read this article. 


Having helped organizations articulate measures so they can see progress, the first critical area to tackle are which measures are going to be used that are the most meaningful, given the project's objectives. 


This article will give you several ideas for how to get started.


Enjoy!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Sandra V. Barbosa's comment, November 5, 2012 10:17 PM
I'm Brazilian. I'm English teacher. Follow me. Thanks.
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What Data Can't Tell You About Customers -- Evoke Stories Instead!

What Data Can't Tell You About Customers -- Evoke Stories Instead! | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

To really know customers you must engage them face-to-face.

This is a handly little article reminding us all that data and "likes" can only take us so far. If we really want to know our customers to help guide for innovation, marketing, business relationships, and ultimately business growth, then face-to-face interactions are imperative.

OK -- now we've gotten that message, and we are in front of a customer, now what? How do you maximize your time together?

The practical answer is to ask for, and listen to, their stories! That is what this article does not say. Yet that is your path to success.

What stories do you ask for? Ask them to share with you their experiences of your product/service, your company, your marketing/branding, or whatever burning question you need an answer to.

Just remember, most people ask information questions where they get lots of description but little story. That's not so helpful. They will ask someone to describe what they like about their product. In return they will gets answers like, "I like the blue color, and how it fits in my hand." interesting, but not so helpful.

Ask for EXPIENCES instead: "Tell me about the first time you used our product and what that was like ..." In return, you will receive a story rich in material and meaning: "One day I was really struggling one day to open a jar. For some reason my arthritis was really bad that morning and I couldn't get the strength to open that jar. I didn't want to ask my daughter for help because i hate feeling dependent on someone just to open a jar! A friend had given me your handy opener as a gift but I hadn't even taken it out of its packaging yet. That morning I grabbed it but had a devil of a time getting it out of its plastic wrapping! I finally took a scissors to it, which means I probably have blunt scissors now [HINT for changing packaging]. But I finally got it opened and used it on that jar I was struggling with. Voila! It was so easy! I had that jar open in a jiffy. Your design made it very easy in my hands. I checked out your website to see if it came in other colors so I could give it as a gift to friends. Was kind of disappointed in the color selection but I'll make do. I'm sure they will appreciate its ease and cool design like I do."

You get the picture -- haven't customers share experiences is much more valuable. From the little story above you can now dig deeper into the story, or keep asking for later experiences.

Enjoy this process. Take your time -- no need to schedule 20 interviews to aquire tons of material. A handful will do to get you started. Remember you are going for quality, not quantity. You will learn as you go and interviews down the line will be richer and more complex because you will have gotten better at evoking stories from your customers.

I would love to hear about your experiences doing this activity!

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 6, 2012 9:32 AM
Yes, I am so impressed about this illustration of a fact. Through consistency and perseverance of digging the actual facts and remedies to problems, we can solve problems. It may not be so easy as we thought it could be, but with the proper motivation, we surely can get the optimum results to our goals.
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Just Story It - The Best Ever Biz Story Book List For You

Just Story It - The Best Ever Biz Story Book List For You | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

I have finally added a list of my favorite biz story books to my website that you can now access and explore yourself. There are 26 all total!


These books are the best I've found that will help you build practical storytelling skills, and make us all smarter about business narratives. I've added little reviews for each book explaining why I like it.


The books include everything from conducting narrative research within organizations, how leaders can use storytelling, stories in marketing/branding, how to use stories for change and transformation, and using stories for break-through communication.


The books include many business examples, processes, and how-to steps. I hope they prove useful for you. Enjoy!


PS -- and let me know if you have recommendations!

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Cyndee Haydon www.SandbarsToSunsets.com's comment, March 11, 2012 4:39 AM
Karen I was going to say "The Story Factor" - my favorite book of the last 5 years - great stuff in there that has helped our business & blog - thanks, Cyndee
Karen Dietz's comment, March 11, 2012 9:17 PM
Thank you for re-scooping this Stephane! Have a wonderful week :)
Karen Dietz's comment, March 11, 2012 9:18 PM
Thank you Gimli! Have a wonderful week :)

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