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Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Growing executive's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com  619-235-0052
Curated by Karen Dietz
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Start With WHERE, Not WHY In Your Stories

Start With WHERE, Not WHY In Your Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

My business storytelling colleague Paul Andrew Costello shares great wisdom with us as he challenges the popular notion of "start with WHY", so rampant today in business/business storytelling circles. 

Karen Dietz's insight:

Paul, I couldn't agree more. WHY has it's place, but WHERE is much more powerful. I like your approach much better. 

Folks -- check out Paul's post and let's get unstuck from WHY


Click on the link above to read the entire recent thread from Worldwide Story Work group on Facebook. In the post, participant names are hyperlinked so you can check them out.


Here are the opening paragraphs:

START WITH WHERE, NOT WHY

Paul Andrew Costello The new book, all the rage is, "Start With WHY" (Simon Sinek), but Why? dare I ask?

I want to write a book in reply, titled, Don’t start with WHY, start with WHERE. Because Why assumes there is a reason, whereas more times than not, WHY is a SITUATION, not a reason. Why are police in controversy? Why are young men from minorities being targeted? Why is America still so scared of terrorism? Don't formulate some grand theory about racism or class, just go into those streets and meet those people and you understand that a thousand reasons wont do justice to the situation. 

A why question implies that people have the luxury of an answer, as if the world must always conform to cause and effect logic, or that people always have the freedom to have reasons, rather than acting out of necessity. Most human complexities are compounded by answer-denying situations and once you give an answer, its immediately wrong because there is no one answer. 


Go read the blog post for the entire conversation and what people in the biz story world really think about the notion "Start With Why".

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Conveying Change Better: The Strategic Narrative How To

Conveying Change Better: The Strategic Narrative How To | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Strategic narratives are a form of storytelling, and like all good stories, they need a compelling plot, characters, a climax, and a conclusion. By telling this story, employees and other stakeholders will understand their place in the larger narrative and how they can take an active role in shaping the future of your organization.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This article, written by Chris Cancialosi, features my biz storytelling buddy Christine Cavanaugh-Simmons. She contributes the information on creating a strategy narrative, which is a solid take-away for any business who is into succeeding.


The biggest failures with strategies is first the inability to convey them, and then second, to implement them. And if you can't convey them, you can't implement. Which is why this article is so important because it focuses on how to communicate your strategy. You communicate your strategy to staff, vendors, and even customers.


Christine answers the question "What is a strategy narrative?" and gives us the structure for it. The author, Chris, gives us the 'why' and 'how'.


Go read this post now so you don't stumble once you have your strategy figured out.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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The importance of storytelling for business change, social change

The importance of storytelling for business change, social change | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

“A new world requires new stories, but people will only listen to them when they themselves are included in the storyline.”

Karen Dietz's insight:

What a thoughtful, rich, and informative article this is! Yes, it's about what needs to happen in storytelling for social change to happen. But the author, Simon Hodges in the UK, makes a strong case that the same points apply to business as well.


In fact, they apply to anyone who desires to inspire people to make a change. Any leader, marketer, brander, or social change activist will be better equipped to use stories to advance business or a cause after reading this. This is because the author doesn't focus on plot, characters, emotions or other story mechanics -- but on precious story dynamics instead.


This is a must read, IMHO.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Mixing Long-Term Goals w/ Short Term Wins in Your Storytelling For Success

Mixing Long-Term Goals w/ Short Term Wins in Your Storytelling For Success | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Share your victories, but don't focus on them so much that your audience loses the big picture.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's a quick nugget of advice on business storytelling for the weekend. When your storytelling has a big job to do -- like change public views on a topic -- craft lots of stories that move you toward your long term goal. 


In other words, forget the notion of a big all-encompassing 'brand story' and go for stories creating lots of small wins.


As I work more and more with advocacy storytelling, this makes perfect sense to me. And it's a big difference from how many companies approach storytelling.


So read this article and add the tips made here to your toolkit.

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Stories: What Sinks Organizational Change Infographic

Stories: What Sinks Organizational Change Infographic | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Some aspects of organizational culture are visible on the surface, like the tip of an iceberg, while others are implicit and submerged within the organization. Because these ingrained assumptions are tacit and below the surface, they are not easy to see or deal with, although they affect everything the organization does.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Karen Dietz's insight:

Gotta love this. Here's an infographic that takes a lot of the mystery out of why change efforts fail. This particular piece is about organizations, but it applies to any size business, and even to personal change.


Look at where stories sit: they are the biggest factor, just a hair above feelings. Now look at where shared values are -- near the top of the iceberg. Yet how often are we told with stories to tell ones that focus on shared values? Lots! So -- bzzzzzzz (buzzer sound) -- wrong answer. Or "give folks a vision and share stories about the 'why' behind it". Hear that buzzer again.


OK -- what this infographic is telling us that we've got to go deeper into the underbelly of the iceberg. In other words, listen for the stories people are telling and identify those deep emotions to understand what they really mean. This leads to understanding unwritten rules and behavior norms. Then start working on shifting the stories of "how we do things around here". Keep working up the chart.


Want personal change? Here's the process.


No question -- it's hard work and not easy. But at least this offers a clear road map. Keep it handy.


Many thanks to fellow curator icki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor for originally finding and sharing this piece.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 



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Anne Egros's curator insight, May 17, 2:33 PM

What really drives organizations ?

Gudrun Hoehne's curator insight, May 20, 4:49 AM

In global companies sometime the organizational cultures differ according to the subsidiaries. This is also of importance for virtual tems who work acroos different subsidiaries and countries.

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 8, 11:07 AM

Lo que hay bajo el Currículum: El Currículum Oculto

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Storytelling Is The How--Leadership Courage: Creating A Culture Where People Take Risks

Storytelling Is The How--Leadership Courage: Creating A Culture Where People Take Risks | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The human ingenuity within any organisation are it's greatest competitive advantage. Yet according to the latest statistics, over half of todays workers are disengaged . When leaders are committed and actively working to engage, inspire and embolden – they unleash untapped potential and raise the bar not just on productivity, but on the value their organization contributes to all stakeholders.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Karen Dietz
Karen Dietz's insight:

The infographic above says it all -- beyond the numbers, this is the work of leaders. The article by Margie Warrell does a great job explaining what each of these 3 activities are and why they are important.


Now here's my 2 cents: one of the most powerful and efficient ways to get all 3 done is through effective storytelling. Want to succeed as a leader? Want to make a difference? Want to change the world/your company? Master storytelling skills.


Enjoy this post and many thanks to fellow curator Dr. Susan Bainbridge for originally finding and sharing this article in her Transformational Leadership curation.

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Andrea Payne's curator insight, January 27, 3:23 PM

I've been reading "Real Influence" by Robert Ullman and John Goulston (http://www.amazon.ca/Real-Influence-Persuade-Without-Pushing/dp/081442015X), and they talk about the importance of connecting authentically.  In Real Influence, Ullman and Goulston refer to this authenticity as "Connected Influence".  

W. Bradley Gooderham's curator insight, January 28, 4:38 PM

The future need innovators and the present needs innovative teachers to nurture them.   Creativity and the ability to innovate are natural characteristics but they must be built up and encouraged in our students, colleagues, and selves.


IteratED is committed to bringing out and nurturing the best in all of our faculty and students. We understand that this requires greater autonomy to make decisions and more trust in the natural ability to learn through exploration.


Are you a teacher who wants to reach for your highest potential? We are here to help you get there. Contact IteratED for more information on how together we can provide exceptional 21st-century education.

Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, March 26, 9:03 AM

Be strong and courageous.

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Can You Instill Hope Via Stories? If Not You'll Fail Miserably As A Leader

Can You Instill Hope Via Stories? If Not You'll Fail Miserably As A Leader | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
You may think you're an effective leader, but if you're crushing hope in your organization, you'll fail.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This post is all about leadership and storytelling -- specifically, the ability to be hopeful, and instill that hope in others. And how do leaders instill hope? The way it's been done for 100's of 1000's of years: through effective storytelling.


This article is an interview with Libby Gill who is on a mission to bring hope, and "hope theory" back into the workplace, and a front-and-center activity for leaders.


A business axiom these days is "hope is not a strategy". I say that holds true only when the context is about not taking action. At any other time, hope definitely IS a strategy, and one of the most important activities of a leader. Crafting stories with messages of hope is critical for success.


I like the etymology of hope that Gill provides. I'll add a bit to it. Before the 12th Century, hope meant "trust; reliance". Good words to ponder.


Gill shares a lot about hope theory, research into hope, and the dynamics of hope in the workplace. She distinguishes hope from positive thinking, and gives us tangible steps to take -- and some to avoid -- to instill this emotion in others.


It's time to get our hope mojo on. Read the article -- you'll be glad you did.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, December 3, 2014 3:03 PM

Good one, Karen Dietz, and thanks for your overview

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Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling

Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
“What I’ve seen is a leader doesn’t start with storytelling, they start with story listening.” -John Maeda, Design Partner, KPCB During the past two years, B2C as well as B2B marketing leader…
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1yFRJRQ 


B2B companies must engage in storytelling to enhance their growth, says author Tony Zambito. That's not new news to us -- and in fact, applies to all businesses.


But what I particularly like about this article is how Zambito focuses on developing the skill of story listening in order to make that B2B growth happen. And Zambito should know -- he's an expert in creating buyer personas -- a critical storytelling step for marketers.


The author shares a video from John Maeda who does a fabulous job talking about how story listening always comes first for leaders -- of any kind, in any industry -- and then links this practice with design thinking, human-centered marketing, empathy, and vision.


Since 2001 I've been training my leadership clients first in story listening and it's made all the difference. I love how Maeda has put it all together in such a succinct and engaging way.


Enjoy this article along with the video. The author did a great job putting together the material. You'll be glad you watched it and gathered the wisdom from this post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Zeb WATURUOCHA, PhD's curator insight, October 31, 2014 1:00 AM

It is true that if you don't listen to me, I will not listen to you though I might pretend to be listening because you are my boss.

Raymond Godding's curator insight, October 31, 2014 4:01 PM

Leiders die beweging tot stand willen brengen, beginnen met luisteren voordat ze gaan vertellen. 

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Storytelling Implications: Appealing To Values, Not Attitudes

Storytelling Implications: Appealing To Values, Not Attitudes | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
In any industry, some of the most successful new business ideas are the most radical. But these are also the most likely to fail, fast. Having a proposition that goes against the prevailing view can be game-changing; if you can get people to agree with you. And there’s the hard [...]
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's something to think about over the weekend -- when you are sharing your stories is your objective to change attitudes or values?


Turns out the answer could make a world of difference for you if you want to be more successful.


For many years I wrote about values (personal and organization), did workshops about them, and diagnosed companies regarding them. Here is part of what I taught:  values generate beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes. But the foundation is always a person's values.


So if you really want to fundamentally change yourself -- or facilitate change in someone else -- look to values.


This article does a handy job of explaining all of this and shares some important research from 2012 about circumventing resistance.


Bottom line for storytelling: craft your stories to address values, not simply attitudes. If you do so, you will rock the world.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Data Storytelling: How To Make A Big Difference

Data Storytelling: How To Make A Big Difference | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Many people will be familiar with signs by the side of the road exhorting drivers to take their litter away with them. In the past, those signs would remind transgressors of the penalties they faced if caught. Nowadays, they are more likely to feature a statement along the lines of [...]
Karen Dietz's insight:

As I continue to help clients and students integrate data into stories and presentations, I'm finding great truth in the ideas presented in this article.


This post focuses on a specific category of information that when shared can move mountains. The information simply conveys what "other people do."


If you need to influence people in any way, take the advice in this article to heart. The author writes about how to share "what other people do" and gives fab examples to back it up.


Enjoy reading this piece and adding these tips into your data storytelling toolkit.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Story Skills Are Critical for All Rungs of Org Ladder

Story Skills Are Critical for All Rungs of Org Ladder | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago we were asked to analyze a competency model that had been created by a client. The assumption of their model was that as leaders move up to higher levels in the organization, some competencies become more important. For example, in their model they proposed that a [...]
Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here is a study showing how influence and motivation skills are necessary for both managers and leaders. This is unique because instead of just focusing on leader skills, this study surveyed senior executives, middle-managers, and lower level managers.


You'd think that the skills would differ as you go up the org food chain. Not so! As you can see from the chart, motivation, influence, communication skills and authenticity are critical at all levels.


How does this connect with storytelling? Because the way to realize "inspiring and motivating others", "display high integrity and honesty", "communicates powerfully and prolifically", "builds relationships", and the like is being able to listen for and share compelling stories that move people to action.


There are several more key insights this article shares. 332,860 bosses, peers, and subordinates participated in this study by Zenger/Folkman. Wow! Anyone in charge of people needs to get their storytelling game on in order to survive and thrive in today's business climate. This applies to nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and solopreneurs also. 


For the solopreneurs, it's taking these skills and applying it to marketing and sales to grow you business. For nonprofits it's taking these skills to build donations, staff and volunteer commitment, and building communities.


Bottom line: keep building those story skills to reach your dreams.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What are the top skills every leader needs? Story makes it happen.

What are the top skills every leader needs? Story makes it happen. | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Fail to develop these at your peril.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's the latest research on needed leadership skills -- and storytelling is the way to achieve results for #1, 2, 5, 7, 10, 13, 14, and 16.


This covers inspiring and motivating others, displaying integrity/honesty, building relationship, developing others, championing change, connecting the company to the outside world, and practicing self development.


Stories play a role in all of these. Yes, who knew? It's all about knowing what stories to tell when, how to tell them effectively, how to listen for stories, and how to foster both engagement and achieving goals through stories. 


Now stories won't cure everything. But storytelling (and all that involves) is a core competency for leaders.


Enjoy reading all about the research and findings. It's a short article.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Climate Change Storytelling: How Stories Can Help Turn the Tide On Any Complex Issue

Climate Change Storytelling: How Stories Can Help Turn the Tide On Any Complex Issue | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
There is no shortage of discussion on climate change; it seems almost pervasive these days. The media report extreme weather events, animal extinction (think polar bears floating off to sea), health problems, and the political push and pull around the issue.  The problem is also prevalent in popular culture, with magazines running special issues, movies showing the end of our days, and video games that presenting post-apocalyptic scenarios.  Yet, we have very little consensus about how to deal with it. Robert Redford recently wrote a blog post calling for more storytelling on “complicated, politically charged issues like our environment and the need for swift action to combat climate change.”
Karen Dietz's insight:

If you are committed to positive change happening on any complicated social issue, stories can help. And here's a terrific post by Roxanne Bauer discussing how storytelling makes a difference -- and its limitations, too.


Years ago I coached the top global expert on grizzly bears. Her lament: "We scientists keep doing the same thing over and over again (sharing data and danger) and expecting different results. I think storytelling may be the answer to bring about needed change."


She is so right. Her stories about the importance of, decline of, and what to do about supporting grizzly bears got standing ovations.


This is not so much an article about "Yes we can". It's understanding more about how stories work on making complex issues less intimidating, and how they overcome the limitations of technical language where eyes glaze over.


I particularly like Bauer's statement that stories can/should address the underlying consequences of an issue that hit home for people. She's got good examples to make her point.


To change the world, get your storytelling game on. Let's remember what doesn't work/hasn't worked and share stories to experience different results.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, June 15, 2014 8:41 AM

Glad to see influential people who know how to tell a story get involved.

Joao Leao's curator insight, June 17, 2014 11:43 AM

Climate change is NOT a Story!

 

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Using Metaphor Maps To Move Groups Forward -- Storytelling Process

Using Metaphor Maps To Move Groups Forward -- Storytelling Process | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Using Art to Create A Safe Place for Dangerous Truths When you walk into a room and see people leaning back with crossed arms, responding to words like “teamwork” with rolling eyes and cynical smiles, or worse, staring into space with blank faces...
Karen Dietz's insight:

When working with groups, sometimes getting people to open up to really get to the stories driving them can be tough. Because what you are going for is not the "Tell me about the time your team's most successful project..." or "Tell me about the time your team made a big mistake..."


Nope -- those won't do. What you are going for is the underbelly, the stories that are building walls, divisions, mistrust, turf wars, and the like. Sometimes to move groups forward, you've got to dig into the guts and bring some light to the situation.


But you also don't want to get stuck in unleashing a horde of "Ain't it awful" stories full of blame and victimization.


So what do you do? As biz story colleague Annette Simmons so eloquently shows us, you need to break down barriers and have people reframe what's going on. They way to do that is using art and metaphor maps.


Simmons shares with us a handy process that gets this work done. Metaphors are building blocks of stories. If you need to change the stories of a group, start with metaphors maps.


Thanks Annette! There's timeless wisdom here combined with good story work technique.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How a government agency ditched its macho culture with storytelling

How a government agency ditched its macho culture with storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Storytelling and breathing techniques are among the ways senior leaders say BIS has achieved a 50/50 gender balance on its leadership team
Karen Dietz's insight:

Well, if a government agency in Britain can positively change its culture, then any one can. This article talks about how they did it. And it includes storytelling.


Sure -- they made some systems changes, like removing 4 layers of management. But they also focused on storytelling. It's the perfect one-two punch that ensures success.


The leaders of the organization say that storytelling has helped them go beyond their traditional ways of communicating to be more honest, personal and open in talking and listening to staff. This has led changing the way people lead the department, and finding solutions that have dramatically changed their culture for the better.


Read the article for another example of how storytelling in leadership actually works.

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Morgan Newall's curator insight, April 24, 10:24 AM

This is really interesting, and very closely aligned to the work I'm moving towards, and passionate about. Creating and living a created Brand Story. If it can be done in such an organisation steeped in bureaucracy, it can be done anywhere. 

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Storytelling: The Foundation For Change

Storytelling: The Foundation For Change | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Personal change is difficult and rare. These 3 strategies help us change even the most intractable habits.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article LInk: http://www.forbes.com/sites/kathycaprino/2015/02/06/the-3-most-powerful-ways-to-change-people-who-dont-want-to-change/3/


The original title of this article by Kathy Caprino for Forbes Magazine is "The 3 Most Powerful Ways To Change People Who Don't Want To Change". You'd never know that storytelling is the bedrock for all change.


Caprino is interviewing David Maxwell, one of the authors of a favorite book of mine, Influencer. Before social, personal, or structural can be leveraged to make a change, the dominating story needs to be dealt with first. Tips for how to do so are shared.


Go read the article. It makes tons of sense. Want change? Story it first.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Getting Your Team Thinking Differently About the Future: Avoiding Narrative Fallacy

Getting Your Team Thinking Differently About the Future: Avoiding Narrative Fallacy | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Thinking about the future is hard, mainly because we are glued to the present.
Karen Dietz's insight:

ARTICLE LINK: https://hbr.org/2015/01/an-exercise-to-get-your-team-thinking-differently-about-the-future


This post by Leonard Fuld for HBR is both interesting and problematic. I am always on the hunt for good articles about creating future stories -- because they are not easy to do.


So this one caught my eye. Fuld describes a team who used a technique for scenario planning from Daniel Kahneman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist and author of Thinking, Fast and Slow. Kahneman uses a technique that promises to avoid "narrative fallacy" -- seeing the future as merely a slight variation of yesterday. 


I was having a wonderful conversation last Friday with Alan Briskin, author of Collective Wisdom, where he was sharing with me some brain research. It's been documented that humans are terrible at forecasting into the future because of cognitive and emotional biases (how I will feel in the future: "if I'm successful in business all my problems will be solved"), plus projection bias (projecting my current state of mind into the future and onto others: "my boss will never change"). Yet neuroscience researchers are finding that mindfulness, "walk a mile in my shoes" stories creating empathy between people, and the quality of storytelling might  help us overcome these barriers.


HEADS UP: Future stories help us communicate about the future we are deliberately and consciously creating. Scenario planning is a process for uncovering hidden risks and better planning for the future.


So you can see why I was interested in Kahneman's process for avoiding those biases and "narrative fallacy". It is hard to think about the future and craft stories about what we are creating/or what we can plan for that aren't pie-in-the-sky junk or totally miss the mark.


Here is where the article disappoints, however. The actual technique is never shared so we don't really know how to avoid "narrative fallacy". Bummer. The article instead focuses on the scenarios and implications the group came up with.


Bottom line: this is an interesting development in "future story" that we need to know about, but we are not out of the woods yet. Hopefully really good techniques for avoiding our biases and learning how to use story processes to create effective future stories of all types will continue to emerge.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How To Tackle Mistakes + Feedback Through Storytelling

How To Tackle Mistakes + Feedback Through Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Whether it's the sandwich method of criticism, direct criticism, or persuasion methods, there are plenty of strategies you can use to convince someone to change their ways. Tell someone a relatable, convincing story to get them to see the consequences of their actions and change.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This is a very quick article that connects directly with another post I curated today on Similar Stories and their use in sales.


This article by Tori Reid talks about how to talk about mistakes by sharing a Similar Story. The application in this case is to help someone change their behavior. Of course, it could apply to sales situations also. In the field of Folklore we would call these 'cautionary tales'.


Regardless, the point of this piece is how to offer criticism in indirect, yet powerful ways through storytelling. Reid shares 2 reasons why this works.


I wouldn't use this technique 100% of the time, but it is important to have in your storytelling tool box.

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Skill Great Leaders Have: How to Reframe a Story

Skill Great Leaders Have: How to Reframe a Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The story you tell yourself and others can make all the difference.

Via Kevin Watson
Karen Dietz's insight:

My fellow curator Kevin Watson originally scooped this for his curation Leadership Lite. I love it and thanks for finding and sharing it Kevin!


Every business story can be reframed -- and should -- depending on your intention for telling the story, and your audience at that particular time.


Leaders who have mastered storytelling know how to do this. You can do it too! The author of this post, Minda Zetlin, shares 3 steps for how to reframe our stories. 


Read the article, grab the 3 steps, then take one of your stories and reframe it per the tips here. Reframing is a great way to refresh your stories and keep them alive.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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donhornsby's curator insight, January 8, 9:11 AM

(From the article) As a leader, the way you frame your stories affects more than just you. "You have to understand the importance of narrative," Bolman says. "A great leader tells a great story. The story serves as an intellectual framework, but it's also emotional and even spiritual. Typically, it's a story of great challenge, adventure, and achievement. A great story orients the leader, but also everyone around the leader. That helps them understand what the business is about and where you are trying to go."

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Good Storytelling--Why Your Brain Loves It

Good Storytelling--Why Your Brain Loves It | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Studying the neuroscience of compelling communication.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1tj3Kea 


Here is an Harvard Business Review (HBR) article from researcher Paul Zak with more information about the neuroscience behind why stories work so well.


Zak explains the latest they have found in their brain research on storytelling. It's good stuff! And we now know more about what stories produce in the brain.


LOL -- we've known storytelling works because it's been around for 100,000 years. Now science can tell us why. And now when I work with clients I often have to start with the science of storytelling so people will accept that storytelling works. This just goes to prove Zak's point that we always want to know the "why" before taking action!


Enjoy reading about the latest insights on the neuroscience of storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Stories and change -- the good, the bad

Stories and change -- the good, the bad | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
We’ve just been listening to a talk on BBC Radio 4 by Philippa Perry about why stories are so powerful. Philippa’s background is in psychotherapy, and she talks about the subject in terms of the...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is a thoughtful post from Sparknow on a part of storytelling we seldom dwell on -- if we are not used to hearing a certain story we may not be able to take it in.


Hmmmmm. The article shares a great example of how this happens. The author then goes on to point out that businesses can be just like that too.


Ah hah -- maybe this is another clue as to why organizational change efforts fail so miserably. People can't hear the new story; they can't take it in.


There are fascinating insights here that I am definitely incorporating into my work.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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One Secret to Nike's Success? Story Tips From Nike's Chief Storyteller

One Secret to Nike's Success? Story Tips From Nike's Chief Storyteller | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
How Storied Leadership Fosters Employee Engagement I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Nike’s Chief Storyteller and Sr. Director of Global HR Talent Development, Nelson Farris. Wow — what an amazing 30 minutes! http://juststoryit.com/podcasts/KDietzPodcast-NelsonFarris-edited.mp3 I’ve known about Nelson since 1999 when I first saw his name in an article about organizational storytelling. I’ve been following... View Article »
Karen Dietz's insight:

Storytelling  in marketing/branding is all the rage. And Nike does a fabulous job at that.


But how else do they work with stories internally to ensure success? Well, my 30 minute podcast with Nike's Chief Storyteller and Sr. Director of Global HR Talent Development brings to light some of their practices and story philosophy.


If you are an entrepreneur, manager, corporate exec, or nonprofit, Farris' insights can apply to you.


Grab this podcast and continue to leverage the heck out of storytelling for your business.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Answer These 3 Questions For Fab Success At Your Next Storied Presentation

Answer These 3 Questions For Fab Success At Your Next Storied Presentation | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Delivering presentations is one of the best ways to build your brand and increase your network, yet public speaking is ranked ahead of death in the list of fears. To succeed at your next speech, focus on your audience and ask yourself these three critical questions.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Every presentation you give -- no matter what time and to whom -- is all about being able to tell your story and succeed.


To help us all get better at presentations of any kind -- whether it's at a team meeting, with senior executives, project managers, investors, sales proposals and presentations -- here are 3 critical questions you need to answer to be able to tell your story well and sell.


While the article is geared toward public speaking, the advice here crosses all applications. Whenever you need to present your ideas, make sure you can answer these 3 questions first.


Follow the tips here and be awesome!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Art Jones's curator insight, August 26, 2014 12:11 PM

Remember, your presentation is not a showcase for how knowledgeable and great you are. Your presentation is your opportunity to share ideas with your audience that position them to be more & do more.

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“Talk the Walk”: A Game Changer The Best Storied Leaders Do

“Talk the Walk”: A Game Changer The Best Storied Leaders Do | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Why words matter.
Karen Dietz's insight:

I like this article because it goes beyond the simple leadership phrase "Walk the talk," which means "live your values, don't just talk about them".


What the author Bill Taylor is focusing on here is the connection between thinking, language, communication, and action. His position is that when leaders start thinking differently, their language changes, then their communication changes, and then if all goes well, their words and actions line up.


In other words, if leaders can break out of the "isms" of their company, they will start thinking differently about the organization and talk about it differently, too. That can be a game-changer for everyone. Want more innovation? Then start thinking about it differently. That starts the cascade to language, communication, and action.


Taylor has good examples to share, and then asks: "So ask yourself, as you try to lead an organization, or a business unit, or a department: Have you developed a vocabulary of competition that helps everyone understand what makes your company or team special and what it takes for them to be at their best? Can you explain, in a language all your own, what separates you from the pack and why you expect to win?"


All of this languaging and communication happens best through storytelling--which then shapes and inspires action of done well.


While this article is all about using shaping and shifting language internally, the next piece of work is making sure it also connects with customers so you don't end up becoming extinct.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What's The Problem With TED Storytelling?

What's The Problem With TED Storytelling? | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
TED is changing the public discourse -- and not all for the better.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's an article that makes us question how TED talks have been shaping our business storytelling -- and maybe not in such a good way.


As the author, Nick Morgan, states -- and I agree with him -- TED talks are fabulous. We love TED. TED talks have definitely impacted business presentations for the better.


Yet Morgan makes 2 very important points regarding public speaking and business storytelling:

  1. Shorter personal speeches. What's wrong with that?? Well, as Morgan says, "What’s wrong with shorter speeches is that you can't persuade people to change in 15 minutes, because you can't make them emotionally uncomfortable enough with the status quo to be ready to embrace something new." He continues with some relevant stats.
  2. A story about your personal revelation might not apply to the goal of the speech. There are all kinds of stories to tell, but TED talks seem to tell us that the stories we should share need to be about a personal revelation we've had.


My take-aways from reading this article and the additional insights Morgan has?

  1. If you want people to change, stories need to be longer. Or presentations need to be longer with several different types of stories told.
  2. A springboard story (short anecdote) may get people started, but other story sharing is needed to sustain the effort.
  3. Personal revelation stories might not be the point -- share stories that are not about you.


There's good common sense wisdom in this article that makes us think twice about effective business storytelling. It is definitely worth the read.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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