Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Growing leader's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com  619-235-0052
Curated by Karen Dietz
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The Power Of Storytelling From John Kotter

The Power Of Storytelling From John Kotter | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
There’s enough evidence today that the brain is hardwired for stories and by that I mean that they can easily slide into our minds with a bit of emotional punch that keeps them memorable and ‘sticky.’ If the story holds some basic lessons, then they have a chance of staying around over time and modifying what we do: changing actions, reinforcing behaviors, making us do what we do (or need to stop doing) with more confidence.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here are 2 heavyweights talking about the power of storytelling: its stickiness, fables, Bruno Bettelheim, evolution and storytelling, and how storytelling can generate long lasting effects. 

 

John Kotter is Founder and Chairman of Kotter International and Professor of Leadership, Emeritus at Harvard Business School. In this post he's talking with his friend Michael McCaskey, author, photographer and former President of the Chicago Bears about the power of storytelling in personal and organizational life.

 

I had the privilege of being certified by Kotter himself in his change management system. He's always been deeply involved in stories, using them in his work.

 

This is a nice, easy read -- perfect for a Friday. Enjoy!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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From StoryCorps: How Storytelling Changes The World

From StoryCorps: How Storytelling Changes The World | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"It's about people connecting. The power of authentic stories is infinite."

Karen Dietz's insight:

Something to enjoy over your weekend: StoryCorps founder Dave Isay shares about the power of storytelling, listening, humanity, and leaving a legacy. These are the foundations upon which all business storytelling is built. 

 

Since its inception in 2003, StoryCorps has collected the largest collection of human voices ever recorded — 65,000 interviews with about 120,000 Americans from all walks of life, generations and backgrounds. StoryCorps hopes to at once preserve history and, as Isay puts it, "collect the wisdom of humanity."

 

This is a wonderful inspiratonal piece to enjoy. Happy reading!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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oconnorandkelly's curator insight, March 18, 12:46 PM

Something to enjoy over your weekend: StoryCorps founder Dave Isay shares about the power of storytelling, listening, humanity, and leaving a legacy. These are the foundations upon which all business storytelling is built. 

 

Since its inception in 2003, StoryCorps has collected the largest collection of human voices ever recorded — 65,000 interviews with about 120,000 Americans from all walks of life, generations and backgrounds. StoryCorps hopes to at once preserve history and, as Isay puts it, "collect the wisdom of humanity."

 

This is a wonderful inspiratonal piece to enjoy. Happy reading!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Conscious Storytelling For Decreasing Conflict and Violence

Conscious Storytelling For Decreasing Conflict and Violence | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
America's transition from a violent, war-like country will only come about if a compelling vision for peace is articulated and communicated widely, and results in a new social movement for peace.
Karen Dietz's insight:

In business we periodically talk about the role of storytellers and the critical role they play in consciously shaping thoughts, attitudes, and beliefs -- mostly as it relates to employee and corporate performance, i.e. culture.


But maybe in the wake of all the recent mass shootings, all of us -- individuals and companies -- need to up our storytelling game and claim our role as shapers around conflict more directly. 


Hence this article by Peter Coleman, Professor of Psychology and Education at Columbia Univ. who wrote this piece for the Huffington Post. He gives us 6 ways any one of us can shape conversations that lead us to a more peaceful workplace and world.


Read the well-written article for all the details -- and the eye-opening stats he shares.


Each of these 6 activities can guide our storytelling:

  1. Stories of tolerance, goodwill, and collaboration
  2. Stories of communities banding together to successfully overcome an obstacle (instead of a lone hero)
  3. Stories of independent folks cooperating together on a project and how it worked so well
  4. Stories of non-warring people/cultures
  5. Stories of symbols and rituals of promoting non-violence
  6. Stories of conflicts that were constructive; stories of how to move conflict from being destructive to constructive


We already have a multitude of stories in each of these 6 buckets. Now, more than ever, we need to tell them, and more widely.


Sadly, Coleman is already receiving hateful comments on his writing. Hate is easy. What is noble, and brings out the best in us as human beings takes work. Saying war is a part of our innate biology that we can't do anything about is a cop out.


For those who think I'm clueless about war, I grew up the daughter of a career Army officer, my dad survived Korea and Vietnam, I've been around generals and senior officers and the military industrial complex all my life, my dad (a tank engineer) had a significant role in creating the Abrams tank (the most successful tank ever), helped redesign the ballistics missile system in Europe in the 1970s, and when we were in Europe we lived with a "red phone" in our house so Dad could get the latest intelligence on terrorist activities. So I'm hardly a stranger to the culture of war. Conflict will always be with us, as will the military. 


Yet each one of us can work to make a difference by consciously choosing stories like those above as an antidote to war. Let's do it. Game on.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Storytelling For Social Change: NY City Police's Powerful Twist

Storytelling For Social Change: NY City Police's Powerful Twist | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
As part of efforts to raise public awareness about the risks and dangers of owning guns, a gun control group called States United To Prevent Gun Violence
Karen Dietz's insight:

This is a very powerful video designed to spark change. It takes the lessons from the Significant Objects Project (attach a personal story to an inexpensive garage sale item and purchasers bid to buy it at a 2,000-6,000 price increase) and applies it to social change. This time it's guns.


Whatever you think about gun ownership, this is an amazing example of what happens when people are told the story behind the weapon. It's a brilliant use of storytelling and gives us ideas of other ways to link stories and objects together.


If you are in favor of gun ownership, you are going to hate this video. If you believe gun deaths are a national health crisis, you will love it.


And don't think I'm naive on this topic. I'm no stranger to guns. I grew up in the military, was around weapons all my life, and back in the day won prizes for my marksmanship. I think this video is awesome and hats off to the NY City Police for putting this together.


Thank you to colleague Mary Alice Arthur for posting the French version to Facebook and pointing it out to me.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How to use stories to influence decision makers

How to use stories to influence decision makers | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Leaders are decision-makers. They have to be. As soon as they walk into the office in the morning, they’re bombarded with decisions that have to be made: ‘Can our business partner sell our product in that new market?
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a great post from my colleagues over at Anecdote. This one is all about influencing decision makers by exposing them to stories outside their own experiences. 


As Shawn Callahan points out, "And of the experiences that get noticed, a few are thought about and translated into a story that explains what happened. Over time, these accumulate into a repertoire of experience-based stories. It is this repertoire that guides intuitive decision-making. To influence a decision-maker, you need to change the stories their intuition relies upon."


He then goes on to give us tips for exactly how to do that. What I also love about Shawn's posts is how often then are based on solid research. At the bottom of the post you will find all the citations cited in the article. Yay! So we are talking hard science, not spouting platitudes. We need more of this kind of writing.


Thanks Shawn.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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2DiFore Marketing Solutions's curator insight, July 28, 2015 7:40 AM

Didn't you just love it when your parents, grandparents or other extended family would tell stories about "when they were young" it was so different!? Well, why don't you tell a story about other client experiences with prospective clients? Turn your successes into sales today.

Kevin Watson's curator insight, July 31, 2015 9:14 AM

What a great post from my colleagues over at Anecdote. This one is all about influencing decision makers by exposing them to stories outside their own experiences. 

 

As Shawn Callahan points out, "And of the experiences that get noticed, a few are thought about and translated into a story that explains what happened. Over time, these accumulate into a repertoire of experience-based stories. It is this repertoire that guides intuitive decision-making. To influence a decision-maker, you need to change the stories their intuition relies upon."


He then goes on to give us tips for exactly how to do that. What I also love about Shawn's posts is how often then are based on solid research. At the bottom of the post you will find all the citations cited in the article. Yay! So we are talking hard science, not spouting platitudes. We need more of this kind of writing.


Thanks Shawn.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, August 1, 2015 4:03 PM

What a great post from my colleagues over at Anecdote. This one is all about influencing decision makers by exposing them to stories outside their own experiences. 


As Shawn Callahan points out, "And of the experiences that get noticed, a few are thought about and translated into a story that explains what happened. Over time, these accumulate into a repertoire of experience-based stories. It is this repertoire that guides intuitive decision-making. To influence a decision-maker, you need to change the stories their intuition relies upon."


He then goes on to give us tips for exactly how to do that. What I also love about Shawn's posts is how often then are based on solid research. At the bottom of the post you will find all the citations cited in the article. Yay! So we are talking hard science, not spouting platitudes. We need more of this kind of writing.


Thanks Shawn.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Start With WHERE, Not WHY In Your Stories

Start With WHERE, Not WHY In Your Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

My business storytelling colleague Paul Andrew Costello shares great wisdom with us as he challenges the popular notion of "start with WHY", so rampant today in business/business storytelling circles. 

Karen Dietz's insight:

Paul, I couldn't agree more. WHY has it's place, but WHERE is much more powerful. I like your approach much better. 

Folks -- check out Paul's post and let's get unstuck from WHY


Click on the link above to read the entire recent thread from Worldwide Story Work group on Facebook. In the post, participant names are hyperlinked so you can check them out.


Here are the opening paragraphs:

START WITH WHERE, NOT WHY

Paul Andrew Costello The new book, all the rage is, "Start With WHY" (Simon Sinek), but Why? dare I ask?

I want to write a book in reply, titled, Don’t start with WHY, start with WHERE. Because Why assumes there is a reason, whereas more times than not, WHY is a SITUATION, not a reason. Why are police in controversy? Why are young men from minorities being targeted? Why is America still so scared of terrorism? Don't formulate some grand theory about racism or class, just go into those streets and meet those people and you understand that a thousand reasons wont do justice to the situation. 

A why question implies that people have the luxury of an answer, as if the world must always conform to cause and effect logic, or that people always have the freedom to have reasons, rather than acting out of necessity. Most human complexities are compounded by answer-denying situations and once you give an answer, its immediately wrong because there is no one answer. 


Go read the blog post for the entire conversation and what people in the biz story world really think about the notion "Start With Why".

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Conveying Change Better: The Strategic Narrative How To

Conveying Change Better: The Strategic Narrative How To | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Strategic narratives are a form of storytelling, and like all good stories, they need a compelling plot, characters, a climax, and a conclusion. By telling this story, employees and other stakeholders will understand their place in the larger narrative and how they can take an active role in shaping the future of your organization.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This article, written by Chris Cancialosi, features my biz storytelling buddy Christine Cavanaugh-Simmons. She contributes the information on creating a strategy narrative, which is a solid take-away for any business who is into succeeding.


The biggest failures with strategies is first the inability to convey them, and then second, to implement them. And if you can't convey them, you can't implement. Which is why this article is so important because it focuses on how to communicate your strategy. You communicate your strategy to staff, vendors, and even customers.


Christine answers the question "What is a strategy narrative?" and gives us the structure for it. The author, Chris, gives us the 'why' and 'how'.


Go read this post now so you don't stumble once you have your strategy figured out.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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The importance of storytelling for business change, social change

The importance of storytelling for business change, social change | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

“A new world requires new stories, but people will only listen to them when they themselves are included in the storyline.”

Karen Dietz's insight:

What a thoughtful, rich, and informative article this is! Yes, it's about what needs to happen in storytelling for social change to happen. But the author, Simon Hodges in the UK, makes a strong case that the same points apply to business as well.


In fact, they apply to anyone who desires to inspire people to make a change. Any leader, marketer, brander, or social change activist will be better equipped to use stories to advance business or a cause after reading this. This is because the author doesn't focus on plot, characters, emotions or other story mechanics -- but on precious story dynamics instead.


This is a must read, IMHO.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Mixing Long-Term Goals w/ Short Term Wins in Your Storytelling For Success

Mixing Long-Term Goals w/ Short Term Wins in Your Storytelling For Success | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Share your victories, but don't focus on them so much that your audience loses the big picture.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's a quick nugget of advice on business storytelling for the weekend. When your storytelling has a big job to do -- like change public views on a topic -- craft lots of stories that move you toward your long term goal. 


In other words, forget the notion of a big all-encompassing 'brand story' and go for stories creating lots of small wins.


As I work more and more with advocacy storytelling, this makes perfect sense to me. And it's a big difference from how many companies approach storytelling.


So read this article and add the tips made here to your toolkit.

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Stories: What Sinks Organizational Change Infographic

Stories: What Sinks Organizational Change Infographic | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Some aspects of organizational culture are visible on the surface, like the tip of an iceberg, while others are implicit and submerged within the organization. Because these ingrained assumptions are tacit and below the surface, they are not easy to see or deal with, although they affect everything the organization does.


Via The Learning Factor
Karen Dietz's insight:

Gotta love this. Here's an infographic that takes a lot of the mystery out of why change efforts fail. This particular piece is about organizations, but it applies to any size business, and even to personal change.


Look at where stories sit: they are the biggest factor, just a hair above feelings. Now look at where shared values are -- near the top of the iceberg. Yet how often are we told with stories to tell ones that focus on shared values? Lots! So -- bzzzzzzz (buzzer sound) -- wrong answer. Or "give folks a vision and share stories about the 'why' behind it". Hear that buzzer again.


OK -- what this infographic is telling us that we've got to go deeper into the underbelly of the iceberg. In other words, listen for the stories people are telling and identify those deep emotions to understand what they really mean. This leads to understanding unwritten rules and behavior norms. Then start working on shifting the stories of "how we do things around here". Keep working up the chart.


Want personal change? Here's the process.


No question -- it's hard work and not easy. But at least this offers a clear road map. Keep it handy.


Many thanks to fellow curator icki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor for originally finding and sharing this piece.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 



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Anne Egros's curator insight, May 17, 2015 2:33 PM

What really drives organizations ?

Gudrun Hoehne's curator insight, May 20, 2015 4:49 AM

In global companies sometime the organizational cultures differ according to the subsidiaries. This is also of importance for virtual tems who work acroos different subsidiaries and countries.

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 8, 2015 11:07 AM

Lo que hay bajo el Currículum: El Currículum Oculto

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Storytelling Is The How--Leadership Courage: Creating A Culture Where People Take Risks

Storytelling Is The How--Leadership Courage: Creating A Culture Where People Take Risks | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The human ingenuity within any organisation are it's greatest competitive advantage. Yet according to the latest statistics, over half of todays workers are disengaged . When leaders are committed and actively working to engage, inspire and embolden – they unleash untapped potential and raise the bar not just on productivity, but on the value their organization contributes to all stakeholders.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Karen Dietz
Karen Dietz's insight:

The infographic above says it all -- beyond the numbers, this is the work of leaders. The article by Margie Warrell does a great job explaining what each of these 3 activities are and why they are important.


Now here's my 2 cents: one of the most powerful and efficient ways to get all 3 done is through effective storytelling. Want to succeed as a leader? Want to make a difference? Want to change the world/your company? Master storytelling skills.


Enjoy this post and many thanks to fellow curator Dr. Susan Bainbridge for originally finding and sharing this article in her Transformational Leadership curation.

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W. Bradley Gooderham's curator insight, January 28, 2015 4:38 PM

The future need innovators and the present needs innovative teachers to nurture them.   Creativity and the ability to innovate are natural characteristics but they must be built up and encouraged in our students, colleagues, and selves.


IteratED is committed to bringing out and nurturing the best in all of our faculty and students. We understand that this requires greater autonomy to make decisions and more trust in the natural ability to learn through exploration.


Are you a teacher who wants to reach for your highest potential? We are here to help you get there. Contact IteratED for more information on how together we can provide exceptional 21st-century education.

Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, March 26, 2015 9:03 AM

Be strong and courageous.

Tony Palmeri's curator insight, October 24, 2015 12:40 PM

"...Human ingenuity within any organization is it's greatest competitive advantage". This quote alone made me scoop this resource. How do we tap into the resource that is our staff? Engaging with them in the classroom and in the hallways to build communication capacity is important. Inspiring staff to take risks is a tricky enterprise - leaders must value this sort of behavior. This means that attempts which result in failure must be cherished, not scrutinized as they often tend to be.  

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Can You Instill Hope Via Stories? If Not You'll Fail Miserably As A Leader

Can You Instill Hope Via Stories? If Not You'll Fail Miserably As A Leader | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
You may think you're an effective leader, but if you're crushing hope in your organization, you'll fail.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This post is all about leadership and storytelling -- specifically, the ability to be hopeful, and instill that hope in others. And how do leaders instill hope? The way it's been done for 100's of 1000's of years: through effective storytelling.


This article is an interview with Libby Gill who is on a mission to bring hope, and "hope theory" back into the workplace, and a front-and-center activity for leaders.


A business axiom these days is "hope is not a strategy". I say that holds true only when the context is about not taking action. At any other time, hope definitely IS a strategy, and one of the most important activities of a leader. Crafting stories with messages of hope is critical for success.


I like the etymology of hope that Gill provides. I'll add a bit to it. Before the 12th Century, hope meant "trust; reliance". Good words to ponder.


Gill shares a lot about hope theory, research into hope, and the dynamics of hope in the workplace. She distinguishes hope from positive thinking, and gives us tangible steps to take -- and some to avoid -- to instill this emotion in others.


It's time to get our hope mojo on. Read the article -- you'll be glad you did.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, December 3, 2014 3:03 PM

Good one, Karen Dietz, and thanks for your overview

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Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling

Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
“What I’ve seen is a leader doesn’t start with storytelling, they start with story listening.” -John Maeda, Design Partner, KPCB During the past two years, B2C as well as B2B marketing leader…
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1yFRJRQ 


B2B companies must engage in storytelling to enhance their growth, says author Tony Zambito. That's not new news to us -- and in fact, applies to all businesses.


But what I particularly like about this article is how Zambito focuses on developing the skill of story listening in order to make that B2B growth happen. And Zambito should know -- he's an expert in creating buyer personas -- a critical storytelling step for marketers.


The author shares a video from John Maeda who does a fabulous job talking about how story listening always comes first for leaders -- of any kind, in any industry -- and then links this practice with design thinking, human-centered marketing, empathy, and vision.


Since 2001 I've been training my leadership clients first in story listening and it's made all the difference. I love how Maeda has put it all together in such a succinct and engaging way.


Enjoy this article along with the video. The author did a great job putting together the material. You'll be glad you watched it and gathered the wisdom from this post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Zeb WATURUOCHA, PhD's curator insight, October 31, 2014 1:00 AM

It is true that if you don't listen to me, I will not listen to you though I might pretend to be listening because you are my boss.

Raymond Godding's curator insight, October 31, 2014 4:01 PM

Leiders die beweging tot stand willen brengen, beginnen met luisteren voordat ze gaan vertellen. 

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Virtual Reality Audiences — The Storytelling Guide

The Storyteller's Guide to the Virtual Reality Audience - Stanford d.school - Medium
As VR storytellers, we are charged with molding experience itself into story, and none of our storytelling tools have pr…
Karen Dietz's insight:

Virtual Reality (VR) storytelling is a hot topic today, and this article talks about the latest research in immersive storytelling.

 

It's one thing to use VR at IKEA or Lowe's home improvement stores to test out furniture and designs. It's quite another to share a story in VR. This post shares insights gained from recent research about what works and what doesn't in VR storytelling.

 

Stuff like:

  1. What is the audience's role in VR? It's fascinating what they discover!
  2. How does the position you stand in and the engagement you have in VR impact the effect of the story?
  3. What do visual constraits have on the story experience?

 

VR is a medium that truly changes storytelling. There are lots of opportunities and lots of pitfalls/dangers. Read this article to keep up to date on this trend.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Janet Vasil's curator insight, April 15, 7:48 AM
Excellent research into VR storytelling.
Minna Kilpeläinen's curator insight, April 15, 4:43 PM
"360° is more than full circle. The more complete the environment, the more it resonates."
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Leadership: It's a Conversation With Storytelling

Leadership: It's a Conversation With Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
How to improve employee engagement and alignment in today’s flatter, more networked organizations
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is an article fresh from Harvard Business Review (HBR) discussion the most critical part of leadership -- that a leader's effectiveness is not so much about command and control, but about conversations with storytelling.


This is how most of our storytelling in life occurs anyway -- in conversation. There's a continuum of business storytelling that starts on one end with conversational storytelling, which then moves all the way to the other end with performance storytelling at the podium.


What I like about this article is how it pays attention to the dynamics of great conversational storytelling. Like intimacy, trust, listening, interactivity, etc.


As a leader, if you want better results then read this article to understand more about the power of conversations. It's the foundation for making change happen.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Stories Told at Work: Their Unexpected Influence

Stories Told at Work: Their Unexpected Influence | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
New research on how ethics are contagious.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Harvard Business Review just came out with this article by Francesca Gina about how stories influence behavior at work -- and the research results organizations experienced. Yahoo!


This is solid documentation that every leader, organizational development specialist, HR director, social change advocate, and story practitioner needs to read.


Links to the research is provided. We've known anecdotally that storytelling provides these benefits, and now research is backing it up.


Enjoy this piece.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How To Create The Culture You Want With Stories

How To Create The Culture You Want With Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
What stories are told in your organization today? Are you aware of them? Do they reinforce your desired culture or do they inspire undesired actions?
Karen Dietz's insight:

The author of this article, S. Chris Edmonds, shares a few incredibly important points for leaders sharing stories. The first one is that stories help guide behavior. Tell the wrong stories and you'll be sorry.


On the other hand, if a leader knows the right stories to share, the bottom line increases. Gotta love that. Makes you wonder why more CEOs are paying attention this. And if you are a CEO who does -- yay!


I will also point out that sharing stories is not enough. Rewards and acknowledgement are critical for success. You'll see what I mean when you read the article.


What I also really like in this post are the 2 stories Edmonds shares to make his point. Not only are they good stories, they drive home the advice he brings to the table. Enjoy.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Elysian Training's curator insight, August 10, 2015 5:43 AM

The author of this article, S. Chris Edmonds, shares a few incredibly important points for leaders sharing stories. The first one is that stories help guide behavior. Tell the wrong stories and you'll be sorry.

 

On the other hand, if a leader knows the right stories to share, the bottom line increases. Gotta love that. Makes you wonder why more CEOs are paying attention this. And if you are a CEO who does -- yay!

 

I will also point out that sharing stories is not enough. Rewards and acknowledgement are critical for success. You'll see what I mean when you read the article.

 

What I also really like in this post are the 2 stories Edmonds shares to make his point. Not only are they good stories, they drive home the advice he brings to the table. Enjoy.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Denise Dyer Coaching's curator insight, August 10, 2015 10:06 AM

The author of this article, S. Chris Edmonds, shares a few incredibly important points for leaders sharing stories. The first one is that stories help guide behavior. Tell the wrong stories and you'll be sorry.

 

On the other hand, if a leader knows the right stories to share, the bottom line increases. Gotta love that. Makes you wonder why more CEOs are paying attention this. And if you are a CEO who does -- yay!

 

I will also point out that sharing stories is not enough. Rewards and acknowledgement are critical for success. You'll see what I mean when you read the article.

 

What I also really like in this post are the 2 stories Edmonds shares to make his point. Not only are they good stories, they drive home the advice he brings to the table. Enjoy.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Ian Berry's curator insight, August 10, 2015 8:46 PM

Good points about wandering around and engaging and listening. I ask 2 questions What's worth celebrating? What can be better?

Andrew Thorp is a leading expert in how to craft a better story about yourself and your business. I'm having a candid and convivial conversation with him on August 20th You can register from http://www.ianberry.biz/events/

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Keeping Your Story Current With Millennial Trends

Keeping Your Story Current With Millennial Trends | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Millennial customer experience lessons drawn from automotive retail (car dealerships): How consulting 5 key customer service trends can transform this industry - and yours - into something that appeals to customers today, whether millennial or Baby Boomer
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's a great post that list Millennial trends, and how one business -- a car dealership -- completely revamped how they interacted with this age group. In the end, they are telling a better story, and giving Millennials way better stories to tell about the business.


Gotta love that. Hey, if a stodgy old auto dealership can do it, so can you. Get hooked up with these trends, make the shifts you need to so you are telling a better story, and generate better stories that others will share about you.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Using Metaphor Maps To Move Groups Forward -- Storytelling Process

Using Metaphor Maps To Move Groups Forward -- Storytelling Process | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Using Art to Create A Safe Place for Dangerous Truths When you walk into a room and see people leaning back with crossed arms, responding to words like “teamwork” with rolling eyes and cynical smiles, or worse, staring into space with blank faces...
Karen Dietz's insight:

When working with groups, sometimes getting people to open up to really get to the stories driving them can be tough. Because what you are going for is not the "Tell me about the time your team's most successful project..." or "Tell me about the time your team made a big mistake..."


Nope -- those won't do. What you are going for is the underbelly, the stories that are building walls, divisions, mistrust, turf wars, and the like. Sometimes to move groups forward, you've got to dig into the guts and bring some light to the situation.


But you also don't want to get stuck in unleashing a horde of "Ain't it awful" stories full of blame and victimization.


So what do you do? As biz story colleague Annette Simmons so eloquently shows us, you need to break down barriers and have people reframe what's going on. They way to do that is using art and metaphor maps.


Simmons shares with us a handy process that gets this work done. Metaphors are building blocks of stories. If you need to change the stories of a group, start with metaphors maps.


Thanks Annette! There's timeless wisdom here combined with good story work technique.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How a government agency ditched its macho culture with storytelling

How a government agency ditched its macho culture with storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Storytelling and breathing techniques are among the ways senior leaders say BIS has achieved a 50/50 gender balance on its leadership team
Karen Dietz's insight:

Well, if a government agency in Britain can positively change its culture, then any one can. This article talks about how they did it. And it includes storytelling.


Sure -- they made some systems changes, like removing 4 layers of management. But they also focused on storytelling. It's the perfect one-two punch that ensures success.


The leaders of the organization say that storytelling has helped them go beyond their traditional ways of communicating to be more honest, personal and open in talking and listening to staff. This has led changing the way people lead the department, and finding solutions that have dramatically changed their culture for the better.


Read the article for another example of how storytelling in leadership actually works.

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Morgan Newall's curator insight, April 24, 2015 10:24 AM

This is really interesting, and very closely aligned to the work I'm moving towards, and passionate about. Creating and living a created Brand Story. If it can be done in such an organisation steeped in bureaucracy, it can be done anywhere. 

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Storytelling: The Foundation For Change

Storytelling: The Foundation For Change | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Personal change is difficult and rare. These 3 strategies help us change even the most intractable habits.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article LInk: http://www.forbes.com/sites/kathycaprino/2015/02/06/the-3-most-powerful-ways-to-change-people-who-dont-want-to-change/3/


The original title of this article by Kathy Caprino for Forbes Magazine is "The 3 Most Powerful Ways To Change People Who Don't Want To Change". You'd never know that storytelling is the bedrock for all change.


Caprino is interviewing David Maxwell, one of the authors of a favorite book of mine, Influencer. Before social, personal, or structural can be leveraged to make a change, the dominating story needs to be dealt with first. Tips for how to do so are shared.


Go read the article. It makes tons of sense. Want change? Story it first.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Getting Your Team Thinking Differently About the Future: Avoiding Narrative Fallacy

Getting Your Team Thinking Differently About the Future: Avoiding Narrative Fallacy | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Thinking about the future is hard, mainly because we are glued to the present.
Karen Dietz's insight:

ARTICLE LINK: https://hbr.org/2015/01/an-exercise-to-get-your-team-thinking-differently-about-the-future


This post by Leonard Fuld for HBR is both interesting and problematic. I am always on the hunt for good articles about creating future stories -- because they are not easy to do.


So this one caught my eye. Fuld describes a team who used a technique for scenario planning from Daniel Kahneman, the Nobel Prize-winning economist and author of Thinking, Fast and Slow. Kahneman uses a technique that promises to avoid "narrative fallacy" -- seeing the future as merely a slight variation of yesterday. 


I was having a wonderful conversation last Friday with Alan Briskin, author of Collective Wisdom, where he was sharing with me some brain research. It's been documented that humans are terrible at forecasting into the future because of cognitive and emotional biases (how I will feel in the future: "if I'm successful in business all my problems will be solved"), plus projection bias (projecting my current state of mind into the future and onto others: "my boss will never change"). Yet neuroscience researchers are finding that mindfulness, "walk a mile in my shoes" stories creating empathy between people, and the quality of storytelling might  help us overcome these barriers.


HEADS UP: Future stories help us communicate about the future we are deliberately and consciously creating. Scenario planning is a process for uncovering hidden risks and better planning for the future.


So you can see why I was interested in Kahneman's process for avoiding those biases and "narrative fallacy". It is hard to think about the future and craft stories about what we are creating/or what we can plan for that aren't pie-in-the-sky junk or totally miss the mark.


Here is where the article disappoints, however. The actual technique is never shared so we don't really know how to avoid "narrative fallacy". Bummer. The article instead focuses on the scenarios and implications the group came up with.


Bottom line: this is an interesting development in "future story" that we need to know about, but we are not out of the woods yet. Hopefully really good techniques for avoiding our biases and learning how to use story processes to create effective future stories of all types will continue to emerge.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How To Tackle Mistakes + Feedback Through Storytelling

How To Tackle Mistakes + Feedback Through Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Whether it's the sandwich method of criticism, direct criticism, or persuasion methods, there are plenty of strategies you can use to convince someone to change their ways. Tell someone a relatable, convincing story to get them to see the consequences of their actions and change.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This is a very quick article that connects directly with another post I curated today on Similar Stories and their use in sales.


This article by Tori Reid talks about how to talk about mistakes by sharing a Similar Story. The application in this case is to help someone change their behavior. Of course, it could apply to sales situations also. In the field of Folklore we would call these 'cautionary tales'.


Regardless, the point of this piece is how to offer criticism in indirect, yet powerful ways through storytelling. Reid shares 2 reasons why this works.


I wouldn't use this technique 100% of the time, but it is important to have in your storytelling tool box.

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Skill Great Leaders Have: How to Reframe a Story

Skill Great Leaders Have: How to Reframe a Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The story you tell yourself and others can make all the difference.

Via Kevin Watson
Karen Dietz's insight:

My fellow curator Kevin Watson originally scooped this for his curation Leadership Lite. I love it and thanks for finding and sharing it Kevin!


Every business story can be reframed -- and should -- depending on your intention for telling the story, and your audience at that particular time.


Leaders who have mastered storytelling know how to do this. You can do it too! The author of this post, Minda Zetlin, shares 3 steps for how to reframe our stories. 


Read the article, grab the 3 steps, then take one of your stories and reframe it per the tips here. Reframing is a great way to refresh your stories and keep them alive.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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donhornsby's curator insight, January 8, 2015 9:11 AM

(From the article) As a leader, the way you frame your stories affects more than just you. "You have to understand the importance of narrative," Bolman says. "A great leader tells a great story. The story serves as an intellectual framework, but it's also emotional and even spiritual. Typically, it's a story of great challenge, adventure, and achievement. A great story orients the leader, but also everyone around the leader. That helps them understand what the business is about and where you are trying to go."

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Good Storytelling--Why Your Brain Loves It

Good Storytelling--Why Your Brain Loves It | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Studying the neuroscience of compelling communication.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1tj3Kea 


Here is an Harvard Business Review (HBR) article from researcher Paul Zak with more information about the neuroscience behind why stories work so well.


Zak explains the latest they have found in their brain research on storytelling. It's good stuff! And we now know more about what stories produce in the brain.


LOL -- we've known storytelling works because it's been around for 100,000 years. Now science can tell us why. And now when I work with clients I often have to start with the science of storytelling so people will accept that storytelling works. This just goes to prove Zak's point that we always want to know the "why" before taking action!


Enjoy reading about the latest insights on the neuroscience of storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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