Just Story It Biz...
Follow
Find
136.1K views | +29 today

Just Story It Newsletter

Sign up for my rather infrequent newsletter
Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Story as a path to transformative leadership & business success    www.juststoryit.com  619-235-0052
Curated by Karen Dietz

${leadGenConfiguration.title}

$leadGenConfiguration.description
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

12 Most Transformational Business Insights From The Last 11 Months -- Lists Storytelling!

12 Most Transformational Business Insights From The Last 11 Months -- Lists Storytelling! | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Don F Perkins captures key business insights from the last 11 months.


So cool -- Storytelling ranks #1 and #12! Truly business storytelling is on the radar screen.  Read the rest of the list to get the whole picture and where this may lead in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Storytelling: The Shared Quest For Excellence in Document Review ...

Storytelling: The Shared Quest For Excellence in Document Review ... | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Storytelling is said to have no place in the hard-edged, logic driven, command-and- control culture to which the legal and business communities have grown accustomed. Euphemisms – like “business narrative” – have been ...


This is a great article focused on laywers, but has insights for us all.  The author talks about documents as narratives, suggesting they fall into three buckets:

  1. Linkage
  2. Gravity
  3. Resonance


He then goes on to suggest how to use those categories when crafting, reviewing, or using those documents and connecting them with implementation plans.  Very useful!


I know I'm going to start looking at my documents in slightly different ways now. Go read the article and get some ideas for how this might apply to your plans, proposals, and other documents.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen Dietz from PINTEREST Watch - Curated by Jan Gordon & John van den brink
Scoop.it!

Pinterest is Great for All Types of Professionals - Here's Why

Pinterest is Great for All Types of Professionals - Here's Why | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Carolyn Elefant for Smallfirminnovation and she has some very interesting suggestions for professionals and how they can take advantage of this exciting new site.

 

And review below was written by fellow curator Jan Gordon on her new Scoop.it curated content called Pinterest Watch. I've added this to the collection here because it looks like Pinterest is going to be a great visual storytelling tool.  I've already signed up for an invitation and can't wait to get started. 

 

Pinterest is definitely not going away anytime soon, I've been on here for a week and it's a whole new way connecting with people through points of interest by sharing topics that tell a story about your business. It's a wonderful way of interacting with them without being intrusive while observing who your customers and seeing how  you can might be of service to them.

 

Here are a few great tips that caught my attention:

 

Depending upon your practice focus, Pinterest can provide a similar source of content.

 

**For example, if you represent small business owners, you might create a board for low-cost office products.

 

**If you work with families with children with special needs, you could aggregate educational toys and products that might help overwhelmed parents alleviate stress.

 

**As you take a look around Pinterest, you’re sure to come up with ideas that work for you.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Pinterest Watch"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/yze3vV]

 


Via janlgordon
more...
Rowan Norrie's comment, January 13, 2012 6:45 AM
Looks interesting Karen. Have signed up, so see how it goes.
Karen Dietz's comment, January 13, 2012 11:07 AM
Yeah, can't wait to get started and share what I learn, along with my pinned pages. Stay tuned!
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Narrative Transport: Worry less about the shoelaces -- Seven Story Learning

Narrative Transport: Worry less about the shoelaces -- Seven Story Learning | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Wait a second, though – have you developed a compelling new branding story with the customer as the hero? As enthusiastic as you may be about the new product features, it may not mean much to a skeptic.


Love love love this article -- about the research and mechanics of narrative transport and how it actually applies to businesses in their marketing and advertising.


Understanding these principles not only makes us smarter about our work, but we have more control (read more success) when we know about, and can apply, these principles to our business storytelling.


The author cites academic research and links to the research article -- but writes in such an engaging (re: storied) way that we completely understand what narrative transport is and what to do about it by the end of the article.


Yahoo!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Stories on the Go! Digital Storytelling with Mobile Devices

Simple K12 presentation! Find the resources here: http://tinyurl.com/shellyterrell 


Here's a great resource that was created for teachers, but you can use it too in your business. The presentation lists a variety of story apps for both the iPad and Android platforms that you can use to create or record and then broadcast your business stories.


Now how cool is that?!  I don't care for the two videos included in the slide deck. And business readers will have to do some translation from the classroom to business. But other than that, this presentation should give you some great ideas for using mobile in your business storytelling.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

How to Create an Enchanting Pitch - Holy Kaw!

How to Create an Enchanting Pitch - Holy Kaw! | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

I’m going to start with a little dissertation on creating effective PowerPoint pitches for your company.


This post is from Guy Kawasaki and it's great. His topic?  How to create an Enchanting Pitch -- in otherwords, how to tell your story to get the contract/client/funds.


In addition to the 11-step structure he gives you, you can also download his PowerPoint deck for you to fill in. He talks about what to add in each slide.


Even if you never have to give a business presentation about your products/services, fill out the slide deck to help you figure out your story.


Guy's tips don't really go into specific storytelling devices you need to use (metaphor, contrast, sensory material, characters). But think of each slide as the place to share a personal story.


What a terrific tool and how-to! Make sure you read the article, grab the file, and start using it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Harnessing the Power of Story to Shape a City's Future | EngagingCities

Harnessing the Power of Story to Shape a City's Future | EngagingCities | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Every place tells a story. But, most don’t do it coherently or intentionally. The tricky thing about stories is that even if a city or a downtown doesn’t want to be telling one, it matters not, because they are telling a story anyway.


Here's what I love about this article -- it is connecting story to the physical environment.


As a folklorist, my specialty and PhD focused on architecture: how people built their buildings and created their environment that reflected their culture, values, creativity, etc.  It was all about the story that the built environment was telling.


Even today I am constantly looking at the landscapes, city scapes, homes and offices to understand the story of that place.  This is enormously helpful when I work at client sites because how their offices and the environments they create for themselves all tell a story about who they are and their view of the world.


So here is an article that talks about this and lays out a story framework for consciously understanding and creating environments that help tell a better story of place.


Enjoy the read and this unique perspective on storytelling.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen Dietz from Story and Narrative
Scoop.it!

The battle of substance and style

The battle of substance and style | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

[From Gregg Morris: I've linked to the book and a few writeups on it. This may be the best one yet.]

 

From the Article: Designers and journalists are coming up with some striking ways to tell stories and convey data visually. But a new book suggests there is something missing from the field that researchers could provide.

 

This article comes from fellow curator Gregg Morris and I really like that he's added it to his collection.  

 

I've seen this book, Visual Storytelling, promoted around the web in the last few months but have hesitated to dig into it.  I've explored it a bit and from what I've seen and read about it, it looked like all fluff and no substance.

 

So when I read this article, I thought it was a much more balanced review of the book, and expressed some of the same concerns I had.

 

I hope you like the review. Infographics and visual storytelling his hot now.  But it will simply be a flash in the pan unless we leverage this tool wisely and intelligently to create meaningful pieces that help us manage the world around us -- not just make us feel good.


Via Gregg Morris
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Seven things Oprah’s last show can teach us about storytelling

Seven things Oprah’s last show can teach us about storytelling | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Everyone who hasn't been living under a rock knows that Oprah ended her 25-year TV show last week. And it was a master example of storytelling, as onlly Oprah can. So what can we learn from her 'piece de resistance'?


I think it's great how the author Gail Kent breaks down Oprah's last show to illustrate effective business storytelling.  As Oprah delivered her "thank you" and "love letter" to her fans, she incorporated 7 steps that made it successful storytelling.


Learn what these 7 steps are and how to wrap up your storytelling with a 'higher purpose' key message.


You too can be as effective as Oprah in your storytelling!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

5 Exercises in Perceptive Listening

5 Exercises in Perceptive Listening | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Listening is a skill that all marketers must develop.


Here's another great read on developing listening skills (absolutely essential for story skills & growing your business) -- with 5 exercises to do.


Have fun!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

How to Become Your Company's Storyteller

How to Become Your Company's Storyteller | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Biographies, product histories and compelling anecdotes can lend a personal touch to any brand--and this resonates with consumers.


This post has great examples of companies who are telling their stories effectively -- including local San Diego business Chuao Chocolatier (one of my favorite chocolates).


Other companies discussed here include erincondren.com and Stauer -- small companies who are making a big impact because of their storytelling.


All businesses in this article either told their personal story in their 'About' and other website pages, or shared the 'history' behind each item they sold.


I had to laugh that the consultant interviewed in the article felt she had to ask nosy, rude and irrelevant questions in order to collect the companies stories.  Obviously she does not know tried and true story evoking techniques.  


There are many other great insights in this article to gather: understanding the 'underdog effect,' emotional connection, and figuring out what your goal is -- so go read it!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Cause Marketing and Fundamental Human Needs by @brianfmartin | Spin Sucks

Cause Marketing and Fundamental Human Needs by @brianfmartin | Spin Sucks | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Cause marketing is now expected from companies and brands. Instead, I propose marketers trace their efforts back to those basic human needs and start trying to meet them.


There are 2 points this article makes that I like:

  1. Make sure the business stories you are telling connect to fundamental human needs
  2. Make sure your business stories, values, and the values of your customers are aligned.


The author also makes the case for adding cause marketing into your efforts.  Read this article to see how KFC didn't connect these dots and got in trouble, and what happened when Yoplait did and won.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Infographics for Nonprofits: The New Storytelling

Infographics for Nonprofits: The New Storytelling | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"As Beth Kanter remarked on a public Google Plus thread about creating useful infographics, “I think that information visualization is a necessity in this age of data overload and seeing the forest beyond the trees.” I agree with that statement, and personally jump to view the “shiny new storytelling toy” whenever I see an infographic. Infographics represent an exciting new storytelling avenue for nonprofit organizations, enabling them to share important data stories, visually."


I don't know how I missed this post by colleague and fellow curator Debra Askanase but it's a good one!


Debra makes the point that infographics can and should tell a story.  She then gives tips on how to do so and resources to use.  


And I love the infographic at the top of the article! It's a perfect example of one that blends both data and storytelling elements.


What are the story elements an infographic can use to be more effective?

  1. It needs to be emotionally engaging in ways that offer people a way to make a difference
  2. Metphor
  3. A beginning, middle & end with a story arc
  4. Statement of a problem and ways for resolution
  5. Story triggers -- graphics and words that trigger stories within the minds of viewers
  6. A point, a key message
  7. Suggested actions to take


Not all infographics need to tell a story. Before embarking on creating an infographic, ask yourself the following strategic questions:

  1. Who is my target audience?
  2. What important information does my target audience need or want to hear?
  3. Is the purpose of the infographic to share information, educate people, or create a context for understanding an issue?
  4. Is the purpose of the infographic to spark action -- either donations, support, or advocacy?
  5. What is my key message? What do I want my viewers to take away from the experience?


If you answered YES to #4, then you need your infographic to tell a story.  If you answered YES to #3, then your infographic only needs to convey information.


Go read the article for more great infographic insights.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Storytelling Reconsidered - Upstart: Business and Management for ...

Storytelling Reconsidered - Upstart: Business and Management for ... | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
There is something crucial you have to deal with when telling a story about your business or personal brand, ... As you may already know, storytelling can be a powerful tool in any marketer's repertoire.


As the author of the post states, "The story you want to tell as a business owner, service provider, etc., doesn’t matter at all unless it intersects with your customers’ individual stories."


Ahhh -- so true! The author Donnie Bryant then goes on to give great how-to tips to stay on track: plot development, eucatastrophe, and it's all about 'them'.


Read this quick post, grab those insights, and keep your eye on the right storytelling ball.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

An Assessment to Find Not Your Story, But Your Story Type - A Storied Career

An Assessment to Find Not Your Story, But Your Story Type - A Storied Career | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"The assessment is based on a model created by Dr. Carol S. Pearson, who specializes in story archetypes. The site describes the index as a “story typing instrument for individuals that illuminates professional assets, values, and gifts through a story-based lens.”


I just took the Professional Values & Story Index (PVSI) assessment to find out my story type -- and no surprise I'm and Explorer! Kat Hansen and I share the same story type which is also fun.


You can explore the assessment too. It's free so go have fun.


In September I reviewed another piece (free ebook) from this company and I just re-wrote the review.  You can find it by using the TAGS tab above, select PR and the group of articles will appear -- you'll see the Storybranding post.


Take the survey and let me know what you think! I use archetypes in a limited way, and only in certain phases of marketing work with clients so I'm curious for your input. Is the information you learned helpful to you?


Thanks Kat Hansen for writing this blog post and pointing us to this resource.

more...
Kat Tansey's comment, January 10, 2012 10:57 AM
Loved this assessment tool, Karen - one of the best I've seen. Thanks for sharing this.

Karen Dietz's comment, January 10, 2012 11:43 AM
Wonderful Kat! Thanks for letting me know. I'll be taking it in just a few more minutes and will add my thoughts also.
Rescooped by Karen Dietz from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
Scoop.it!

Curation As Story – The Importance Of Human Filters

Curation As Story – The Importance Of Human Filters | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

This piece was written by Jeff Turner who has curated a great conversation from members of a tweetchat #tschat today.

 

The article and review below if from fellow curator Jan Gordon and her Content-Curation-Social Media Scoop.it. Thanks Jan for the article and great review! I then read that another fellow curator, Beth Kanter (Social Media & Nonprofits Scoop.it) created the graphic that's used here, but for different blog post of hers.  Ahhh, the social nature of the web!


I hope my readers start thinking about any content they are putting together (website, blog posts, curated topics, etc.) as a larger story that should all be hanging together as a coherent piece.

 

Here's Jan's review:

 

There are many forms of curation, I think this is an excellent real life example of the many ways you can use curation to add value for others.

 

I agree with this, no matter what you're curating, it has to have a story that ties it together:

 

"Curation is a form of storytelling. Curation tools need to support this truth."

 

**Collecting content without qualitative human judgement is aggregation, not curation. The best automation tools alone will never replace the ability of a human being to provide meaningful context.

 

****And the best curation, the curation I subscribe to via email, takes context to the next level. It tells a story.

 

**This post is being written, primarily to serve as an example of what I’m calling “social curation.”

 

**The act of curating a conversation, like the one that took place this morning at #tschat, should be a storytelling act.

 

**every act of curation is a storytelling exercise, whether you use a tool hosted on a third-party site, like Pinterest or Storify, or whether you choose to use tools that allow you to self-host your curation.

 

**In the end, the story is what matters. It’s what has always mattered. Have I told a story, or have I simply collected a bunch of links?"

 

Selected by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"

 

Read full post here: [http://bit.ly/uSxFoL]


Via janlgordon
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, December 27, 2011 11:49 AM
Just noticed that he used a graphic I created! Small world. Good one for my nonprofit curation list.

I really like that last question -- curation is a storytelling act
janlgordon's comment, December 27, 2011 1:06 PM
Beth Kanter -
I love that graphic:-) -

Yes, he makes alot of sense, simple, but to the point
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

What is "Mind Meld"? How to Use Story to Link Minds and Produce New Solutions

What is "Mind Meld"? How to Use Story to Link Minds and Produce New Solutions | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

In my 18 years of facilitating story workshops among every possible population, including groups that were in extreme conflict, I've seen the transformational results that happen when two or more minds are in sync.


The author, Juliet Bruce, talks in this article about when groups are stuck, and how the simple act of sharing a story can break the log jam. Creativity, brainstorming, and problem resolution often follow.


Bruce also briefly goes into the neuroscience of storytelling, and then shares an story about how story sharing unfroze a team, and allowed individual team members to move past difficulties.


This is a lovely, and very effective, application of story sharing in business. Grab the insights in this article and help your team move solve problems and move forward.

more...
Rowan Norrie's comment, January 10, 2012 6:36 AM
That's a great story Karen
Karen Dietz's comment, January 10, 2012 10:33 AM
Hi Rowan! Glad you like the article and story. I love reading about story applications like this one.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Stories and Games Part 1: Art

Stories and Games Part 1: Art | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Can games be art, and should we care either way? Every culture respects some activities and objects as 'art', and grants to these a certain esteem that is entirely apart from their practical uses...the question of whether games can be art is misguided, because all art is a kind of game. To understand why this is so, there's no better place to start than looking at the relationship between games and stories.


Here the author Chris Bateman covers the connections between stories, gaming, and art.  How cool!  I really like his points about the similarities and differences between games and stories because there is too much written out there saying every game needs storytelling to be effective.  But what the heck does that really mean?  This article does a nice job explaining it all -- and linking it to art.


As he says, "...because when we look at books and films as artworks we judge their artistic merits to a great degree on the quality of the story they produce, and the techniques they use to evoke that story, and thinking in this way makes games look like a poor candidate for the esteem afforded to art."


But gaming, art and stories to go together -- and there's more to this statement as Chris shares with us in the article! Enjoy the read.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Stories and Games Part 2: The Emotions of Play

Stories and Games Part 2: The Emotions of Play | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Nonetheless, there is a powerful sense that the fun of a game and the fun of a story are different in some way. What is that distinction?


I love this post because it goes into depth about the nature of play, gaming and story sharing. It's a great romp through the imagination and another facet about why storytelling is so powerful -- whether you are sharing a business story or just sharing a story with friends.


I've long said that storytelling is deep play.  This article explains the how and why of that. The author talks here about the emotions of play he has identified and how that connects to our imagination -- and the imagination of our listeners when we tell a story.


This post is Part 2. Part 1 is about Stories and Games: Art. Can't wait to read that one next!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Case Study: Zappos — How to Create and Tell a Unique Corporate Story

Case Study: Zappos — How to Create and Tell a Unique Corporate Story | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"When you create a strong brand, creating a memorable story is easy. Opportunities to tell your story begin with your employees and radiate outward.  Your story goes viral effortlessly."


So says author Gail Kent and she's right.  Whether you have employees or not, her advice for creating your unique brand story is useable for any size business. It has to do with values, passion, standing out.


Gail uses the company Zappos as an example to illustrate her points.  And there's a great video to watch where Zappos shares its story.


Read the author's tips and start creating your unique story. Enjoy!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

15 Copywriting and Content Marketing Blogs that Will Make You More Money | Copyblogger

15 Copywriting and Content Marketing Blogs that Will Make You More Money | Copyblogger | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Whether you're a professional copywriter or a business owner, read these 15 copywriting and content marketing blogs if you want to make your writing more effective and earn more money.


Well now -- here's a different article than what I typically curate. But once you craft your business stories, you've got to imbed them into your blog, website, other marketing content, and write a bunch of content around them. That's where these 15 copywriting blogs can help you!


It's not enough to simply write or tell your business stories.  We all need to get better and smarter and writing not just great stories, but creating compelling copy.


I've check out the blogs on this list and will definitely keep up with several of these. Ben Settle's looks great, as does Harrison Amy Copywriting, Men with Pens, Success Works, and Works That Begin With You.  And The Rant looks like it will provide the occasional much needed kick-in-the-pants!


I hope these blog writers really help you write great material.


Thank you Copyblogger for putting this list together!

...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

10 Rules for Visual Storytelling

10 Rules for Visual Storytelling | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

For some people, “visual storytelling” means photographs. For others, it means film or video. An epic movie such as the Lord of the Rings trilogy may spring to mind — and few would disagree with that as a fine example of visual storytelling.


What a great post this is because it really lays out all the best ways to think about, and implement, a visual storytelling piece.


A lot of people think visual storytelling is simply one photo or stringing together a bunch of pictures.  Not so! And this post explains why -- and what you need to do to make a successful visual story. Like:

  1. Include basic factual details
  2. You need more than one picture
  3. And know what the story is before you start


Get the rest of the 10 rules so you too can create impactful visual stories to share in your business!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Storytelling Devices for Memorable Personal Story Writing

Storytelling Devices for Memorable Personal Story Writing | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Storytellers need to remember these personal writing tips and include them in every single story, whether we’re telling it orally, or writing it to share on our blogs or elsewhere.


The best business stories are our personal stories or the personal stories of customers, staff, and vendors. But how do you write these stories really well in order to make them memorable and share-able?


This author has great tips for doing just that. Here's the advice I love the most: “You’ll need to write something to discover what your story is. Then you’ll have to rewrite it to work out why your story’s important, and rewrite it again to make the story clear to your readers. But put limits on rewrites. Don’t be a perfectionist and do quash your inner critic.” So true!


Read her other tips to write stories for great blog posts and website content!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Cognitive Biases in Times of Uncertainty--Telling Ourselves A New Story

Cognitive Biases in Times of Uncertainty--Telling Ourselves A New Story | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
We live in a world of increasing pressure and uncertainty, driven in large part by digital technology infrastructures.


Author John Hagel goes on to explain a vicious business mindset we face today that constricts our opportunities and keeps us either stuck, or trending downward.


There are several pieces contributing to this limiting cycle and the narrative we tell ourselves, and each other, is a HUGE part of the problem


Hagel documents the threat-based narrative we are surrounded by and its consequences for our businesses (and political life):

  1. Protectionism
  2. Polarization
  3. Short term focus
  4. Magnified risk while sacrificing potential rewards
  5. Urgent reactionism
  6. Uniformity versus innovation
  7. Minimal trust


This is not what we want for 2012. As writer Salman Rushdie says, "Those who do not have power over the story that dominates their lives truly are powerless, because they cannot think new thoughts."


In other words, if you want different results, change the story you are telling yourself.


Hagel brilliantly lays out the mindset problem and narrative we face today, and offers us an alternative.  The alternative starts with sharing a new narrative, and then supporting structures to make it real.


Read this article.  Shift the story. Add reinforcing structures to your business. You can do this in your own life and business -- you don't have to wait for some powers-t0-be to take action first. 


In this case, it is all about you!

more...
Meri Walker's comment, January 8, 2012 2:38 PM
Just back from 5 days with Byron Katie in Los Angeles and this is precisely what she teaches with The Work. What a great piece! Thanks for sharing it, Karen.
Karen Dietz's comment, January 8, 2012 5:02 PM
Glad you like it Meri! Byron Katie's work is fabulous. I've been talking a lot about this article a lot lately because I think it is so important for people to get. Have a great weekend!
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

3 Ways to Avoid Preaching when you Speak [Tell Stories]

3 Ways to Avoid Preaching when you Speak [Tell Stories] | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Most audiences do not want to be preached to outside of the church. However, it is sometimes easy to fall into preaching especially when you are very passionate about your message. Below are three guidelines you can follow to prevent destroying your speech due to preaching.


What a great article with really god tips! Beginnings and endings when telling stories always trip up my clients who I coach in storytelling.


The biggest concern people have is how to tell a personal story without sounding arrogant.


This article tackles both issues! Follow these tips for improved skills and greater confidence in your storytelling. 

more...
Ken Morrison's comment, April 27, 2013 7:33 AM
I really like this blogger. He shares some great points!
Karen Dietz's comment, April 27, 2013 2:35 PM
Chantal, you make some really great points that help frame the article and show its importance. Many thanks for your insights!
Chantal Sim's comment, April 30, 2013 6:21 AM
Thank you, Professor Morrison, and Mrs.Dietz. I feel so honorable to have both of your comments!
Curated by Karen Dietz
Karen is available for workshops, coaching, public speaking & consulting on telling your story, making values/vision come alive, uniting people to achieve audacious goals, & building transformative leadership. Remember, whoever tells the best story wins!