Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
194.7K views | +15 today
Follow
Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Growing leader's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com
Curated by Karen Dietz
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Why your brain loves music [& stories]

Why your brain loves music [& stories] | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
New neuroscience study sets out to explain why in some respects music offers the same sort of pleasure as a really good thriller.
Karen Dietz's insight:

I love reading about topics related to storytelling and music is definitely one of those.


So here is a wonderful article about how our brains and bodies interact with music. And what is going on in the brain regarding music is almost identical to storytelling!


I like how the article talks about being overwhelmed by a story (that's happened to me), and talks about the notions of 'pleasant surprise' along with 'thwarted expectation'.


And the final point is the kicker: some of the recent studies are too simplistic. As the author Ivan Hewett says, "What we need is a proper dialogue between musicians and scientists; then we might learn something really profound." 


I agree. Too often the studies are simply validating what we already know to be true. This is a necessary step in the research around both music and storytelling. But I think both Hewett and myself are looking for meatier stuff that delivers that 'pleasant surprise' and more.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

more...
Karen Goldfarb Copywriter's curator insight, May 3, 2013 1:18 PM

We are always trying to work out where the music or copywriting / story is heading, and enjoy the journey even if we're wrong. "There is pleasure even in being deceived."

Mirjana Podvorac's curator insight, May 4, 2013 2:08 PM

Some new research on some things teachers have known and used for a long time.

Nimah Nirvanova's curator insight, May 7, 2013 9:27 AM

brainy fun

Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Crafting Your Talk/Story for TED or TEDx

Crafting Your Talk/Story for TED or TEDx | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
A good short talk presents one idea, tells one story, and asks one question.
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a powerful article with a very simple idea: a winning structure to use for a 15-20 minute presentation!


If you are going to speak at TED or TEDx, or if you need to boil down an hour-long presentation to 15-20 minutes, how do you do it?


By following the 3 steps in the article. Written by Nick Morgan who works in public speaking, I think his advice really works.


And story is front and center. Now how great is that?!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 2, 2013 4:12 PM

I'd love to talk at a TED or TEDx conference.

Renee Baribeau's curator insight, May 10, 2013 11:34 AM

Thanks for sharing..

Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Storied Websites: How Eric Ries and Tim Ferriss tell stories on the web

Storied Websites: How Eric Ries and Tim Ferriss tell stories on the web | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
If you want to highlight a product, build a landing page. If you're an internet marketing guru, make a squeeze page. But if you want to start on online movement -- and maybe sell a few books, speak...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here is a new and revolutionary way to actually design a website that is a story, and tells a story.


Wow -- how great! As author John Koetsier says, Eric Ries of The Lean Startup and author Tim Ferris of The 4-Hour Body have figured out how to do this. The article explains the new way to design websites, and gives examples so you can see the difference.


This is not about taking a website and adding stories to it. That's old school -- taking a structure and trying to fit stories into it. This is about changing the website structure so the entire design matches storytelling.


Go read the article to get the full explaination and the examples. It is really cutting edge. Hmmmm -- this is making me rethink my website once again!


What do you think?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Using Cliffhangers: How to Keep Your Audience Reading/Listening

Using Cliffhangers: How to Keep Your Audience Reading/Listening | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Listen ... Just because you got people to read your headline doesn't mean your job is done. Nor is your job done if they read the first sentence. Or
Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here is an interesting article from Demian Farnworth at Copyblogger -- and it is all focused on how to create drama and intrigue in your business stories by using Cliffhangers.


Farnworth defines what cliffhangers are and how to use them in stories. Then he shares with us how to add them into our biz stories for maximum impact. Yeah!


He covers tips like:

Curiosity

Humor

Amazement

Doubt


Then he digs into internal cliffhangers that keep readers moving through non-fiction work (think data).


Very very handy -- and a great way to finesse your business storytelling to new levels in ways that will keep audiences listening/reading and engaged.


Go grab these insights and bring them into your storytelling, blogs, websites, and other content.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 30, 2013 11:48 AM
How great! I am happy you are finding different uses for the material here.
Teresa Carvalho's comment, May 1, 2013 5:42 PM
Thanks for your comments. They're always useful.
Karen Dietz's comment, May 1, 2013 7:31 PM
Thank you Teresa! Have a great day.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Supply Chain Storytelling! How Big Brands Are Doing It & You Can Too

Supply Chain Storytelling! How Big Brands Are Doing It & You Can Too | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

How Big Brands Are Using Supply Chain Storytelling -- MainStreet
Patagonia was one of the first companies to incorporate life-cycle storytelling into its brand narrative.

Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here is a new kind of story cycle to consider -- the stories of your product's/service's entire life cycle from beginning to end! This set of stories is also being called 'supply chain' stories.


And in the case of many of the examples shown here, the end is actually all about recycling, which then generates a whole new set of stories.


Wow -- life cycle stories will keep you busy for awhile and provide a never ending source of stories for your business.


I really like the examples shared in this post, along with the additional points the author points to like lessons Levi Strauss learned as it collecting these kinds of stories and what they did about the knowledge they gained, which created even more stories for them.


I love it. So expand your thinking beyond "Here's a story about how we make our product" or "Here's a story about how we crafted our process" to "Here are the stories along the entire life-cycle of our product/service." 


You will continue to keep customers engaged, and learn critical knowledge in the process. 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
Mike Ellsworth's curator insight, April 27, 2013 5:30 PM

Karen Dietz' insight:

Now here is a new kind of story cycle to consider -- the stories of your product's/service's entire life cycle from beginning to end! This set of stories is also being called 'supply chain' stories.


ME insight:

People want to hear your story. Here's a good way to tell it.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 2, 2013 4:21 PM

What is supply chain storytelling?

Indranil Bhattacharjee's curator insight, May 17, 2013 6:42 AM

Brand Life story

Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Key Insights on Telling a Story with Data

Key Insights on Telling a Story with Data | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Five rules for doing it right...(How to Tell a Story with Data)  @HarvardBiz http://t.co/CcaxzewsjB 

Karen Dietz's insight:

It must be the season for data storytelling because here is another terrific article on how to take data, shape it into meaningful material, and share it as a story to complement a presentation. This adds another influencing tool to your storytelling toolkit.


I really like how the author Jim Stikeleather reminds us of the different types of audiences we need to pay attention to when shaping data into a story. His list is excellent!


I also like this quote from the piece: "Finding the narrative structure will help you decide whether you actually have a story to tell. If you don't, then perhaps this visualization should support exploratory data analysis (EDA) rather than convey information."


And there are very good insights here on not censoring, being balanced, and the time you spend on editing.


For all of us who need or want to share data as part of our storytelling skills, this article is helpful.


This article was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
cristian rafael's comment, April 26, 2013 6:15 PM
hola
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Story With Data: The Ultimate Collection of Resources – @juiceanalytics

Story With Data: The Ultimate Collection of Resources – @juiceanalytics | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Your one stop shop for all you need to know about visual storytelling: http://t.co/ugfABM7nU4
Karen Dietz's insight:

HERE'S THE UPDATED LINK: http://www.juiceanalytics.com/writing/the-ultimate-collection-of-data-storytelling-resources


Hey folks -- I ran across this today and it looks like a fabulous list of quality resources about telling stories using data. Or using data to tell stories. Your choice :)


Data storytelling might not be your thing -- or it could be an activity that is part of your future. 


If so, you are going to want to keep this list available. Not only are there good articles (some I've already scooped here), but there are videos to watch and research papers to explore. I'm always a fan of research because it adds so much credibility.


I haven't read everything here, or watched the videos but they do sound substantial and helpful.


So dig in here. Data storytelling is not easy to do and we need all the help we can get. Many thanks to data geek author Zach Gemignani for putting this post and resources together!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
ozziegontang's curator insight, April 22, 2013 7:34 AM

Thanks to Zach and Team Juice for a site with insight on telling stories using data that is outa sight for all that is shared. II thank Karen Dietz of www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it for the cite. Look for her book coming out in the fall on storytelling for business.



Beth Kanter's comment, April 22, 2013 11:42 AM
Thanks for this great set of resources. I'm working on a module/workshop on data visualization so this is really timely
Karen Dietz's comment, April 23, 2013 9:52 PM
Wonderful Beth! I'm glad the list is going to be helpful for you. I know you will wow them at your workshop :)
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Mister Rogers, Boston Tragedy, & The Rest of The Story

Mister Rogers, Boston Tragedy, & The Rest of The Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
John Sutter says all of us are geared to help, and the responses to the Boston bombings show that.
Karen Dietz's insight:

The Mister Rogers quote about 'look for the helpers' has gone viral in response to the bombings in Boston. But a missing piece of his message is not making the rounds.


I'm on the road now working with clients. Well, this morning in my hotel I was listening to CNN Headline News while cycling through emails. I perked up when they ran the video clip of Mister Rogers where he shares words of wisdom from his mom. 


Yes, it is about helpers. But what all the other tweets and video clips show is only the beginning of the story. There is an even more important message that Mister Rogers conveys!!


I really like the clip shared here by CNN because it also talks about how the media can share more rounded stories. In the hunt for heroes (because we are slaves to the Hero's Journey), we often forget about sharing stories with the frame of 'community.' Telling the story of helpers and the individual stories of helpers helps us know and understand the power of community.


Should I tell you the end of the Mister Rogers quote/story?


Nope -- I won't spoil it for you. Watch the video -- it's short -- and get the powerful key message Mister Rogers wants to share with us all.


You'll be glad you did.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, April 19, 2013 6:32 AM

"Look for the helpers . . . "

Karen Dietz's comment, April 21, 2013 1:42 PM
I appreciate all of your comments and am delighted that you connected to the forgotten key message of the story :)
ozziegontang's curator insight, April 22, 2013 7:51 AM

We are herd/pack animals who call ourselves human beings or social animals.  The helpers are people who revert back to their instinct to help a fellow man.  Often at peril to their own lives. Often sacrificing their own life to save another.  When you look at the derivation of "sacrifice" it is made up of two Latin words "sacra" and "facio"  that is "to make holy."


Bombshel says it beautifully. This is how I shared the Power of One back in 2010 about a dear friend, Rauni Prittinen King who is the co-founder with Dr. Mimi Guarneri of the Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine.


The Power of One united is a force  that reunites body/mind/spirit back into the basics of being: human. 

Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Want to design great products/services? Start with storytelling!

Want to design great products/services? Start with storytelling! | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
It’s not uncommon for designers to confuse a beautiful looking product with one that works beautifully. A great technique for creating smarter, better products is to approach them using story-centered design.
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a great post that everyone can use to help them design their product or service better -- starting out with the customer experience.


How do you get at the customer's experience? Well, by talking with customer first. Then by using storytelling and story techniques to design your product or service based on how people interact with it.


Not sure how to get started? Then this article by Braden Kowitz will help. He makes some great tips you can start playing with. The article is not a step-by-step how-to though, which is unfortunate. But it will allow you to begin the process and make some discoveries as you go along.


Many thanks to fellow curators Giuseppe Mauriello and Baiba Svenca for both suggesting this article to me!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 18, 2013 2:55 PM
I agree GplusSage! More businesses need to think about doing this for their products and services from the customer's perspective. Thanks for your comment.
Karen Dietz's comment, April 18, 2013 2:55 PM
Thank you so much Alison! I appreciate the shout-out. You made my day :)
Tom Tabaczynski's comment, April 21, 2013 11:14 AM
Interesting.
Rescooped by Karen Dietz from Story and Narrative
Scoop.it!

What is a Natural Storyteller?

What is a Natural Storyteller? | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"You know that feeling, when you can’t wait to get home to tell your significant other about the crazy thing that just happened at work? The second you walk through the door, even before you kick off your pinchy-toe shoes, you’re saying, “You’re not going to believe this . . .” as you launch into the story, complete with revealing hand gestures, passion, and well timed pauses that effortlessly build to the riveting climax."


Via Gregg Morris
Karen Dietz's insight:

I love this post about our innate ability to tell stories, why that is, and how to get better at sharing our stories by asking ourselves a few questions.


Really, it is the reflective activity we do after we've shared a story that helps us get better at it. That, and lots of practice.


Lisa and I share a common experience. Over the years, every time I introduce storytelling from the place of structure and elements (beginning/middle/end; character, plot, challenge, resolution) people have a hard time telling a good story. In other words, I bomb!


When I focus instead of them experiencing a story and them get them to share a quick story right away, it's like I've uncorked the Story Genie and I completely lose control of the room. They are so busy, and having so much fun telling stories, they ignore me. And I say, "Yeah!" Then they tell me some of their stories and they are great.


This article talks about the exact same thing, but coming from a fiction writer's perspective. The questions posed here are really good, particularly as you take one of your oral stories and write it down. So use them.


Thanks Lisa Cron for writing this article, and thanks also to fellow curator Gregg Morris at Story and Narrative who scooped this first!

more...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 16, 2013 12:37 PM
And many thanks to Denyse, Comeja, Two Pen's, and Os's additional comments pointing out the value of this article.
Ally Greer's curator insight, June 10, 2013 3:29 PM

Anyone who knows me knows that I love telling stories. (Usually more than once.) The above excerpt essentially describes every single day of my life. Sharing life experiences with people who mean something to me is what makes these experiences that much more exciting.


Read below, as Karen Dietz sums up my thoughts way better than I ever could. Thanks Karen and Gregg!

Dawn Mullen's curator insight, July 4, 2013 9:11 AM
I am a Realtor not a writer. I still have to use the story in both pictures and words to tell the story of a home I am selling. It is true a picture is worth a thousand words and together a picture and a caption should be not just information but a story. Call me. I can show you the difference.
Rescooped by Karen Dietz from Story Selling
Scoop.it!

For Real Influence, Listen Past Your Blind Spots During Story Tending

For Real Influence, Listen Past Your Blind Spots During Story Tending | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"More than ever before, people see through the self-serving tactics and techniques that others use to persuade them."

 

"They don't like being pushed, played or nudged to comply, and they resist and resent agenda-driven influencers."

 

"The alternative is to use real influence to inspire buy-in and commitment."

 

"To invite genuine buy-in and engagement, we need to listen with a strong personal motive to learn and understand." by Mark Goulston and John Ullmen

 

Read more: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2013/03/for_real_influence_use_level_f.html


Via Ken Jondahl
Karen Dietz's insight:

It's the week of listening!


Here's the 3rd article in 2 days about ways to improve our listening skills. Well, all I can say is, it must be time to focus on listening :)


This is what I love about this article that fellow curator Ken Jondahl found: it talks about the 4 types of listening we typically do. And how to avoid those experiences. And how to engage in the kind of listening that does produce powerful insights and results. Yeah.


So go listen better and have fun practicing this weekend!

more...
Ken Jondahl's curator insight, March 24, 2013 6:24 PM

The authors discuss all 4 levels of listening and how the first 3 fall short.

 

In sales and marketing the power of story comes alive when we truly listen to our customers using level 4 as described in the article. However, there are many things which get in the way.

 

If you are in sales or marketing, think about how the customer feels when we do not "tend their story" using level 4 and what bad things can happen. Think about your good and bad "buying" experiences.

 

Was the person actively listening to your issues and needs? Or were they focused on something else?

 

To receive a story in sales, be prepared to go first and share a relevant story. Then actively listen and connect with the person telling their story in return.

 

In story selling, to "positively influence change" we need to build trust one story at a time. Just remember, the majority of these stories should be those of the customer.

Karen Dietz's comment, April 11, 2013 2:18 PM
Great article Ken! Thanks for sharing.
Ken Jondahl's comment, April 12, 2013 4:07 PM
Definitely a gem, recommended by a friend.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

The Power of Business Origin Stories + Tips

The Power of Business Origin Stories + Tips | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Get ready for a great example of an Origin Story. This is one of the most important stories to have in your storytelling quiver ...

Karen Dietz's insight:

Colleague David Lee once again comes through with a great blog post all about business origin stories.


Here he gives us the origin story of the Make A Stand Lemon-aid. It is a terrific example of the power of an origin story.


Don't have a social cause that got you started? Not so fast -- sure you do! You were passionate about some problem you wanted to solve. That's what we want to hear about.


This goes for whether you are an entreprenuer or a huge enterprise.


We all have our origin stories. They are the lifeblood of organizations.


Follow the tips Lee talks about in the article, watch the video for inspiration, and let your passion show!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, April 16, 2013 8:34 AM

Great concept.

THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*'s curator insight, April 17, 2013 12:53 AM
Colleague David Lee once again comes through with a great blog post all about business origin stories. Here he gives us the origin story of the Make A Stand Lemon-aid. It is a terrific example of the power of an origin story. Don't have a social cause that got you started? Not so fast -- sure you do! You were passionate about some problem you wanted to solve. That's what we want to hear about. This goes for whether you are an entreprenuer or a huge enterprise. We all have our origin stories. They are the lifeblood of organizations. Follow the tips Lee talks about in the article, watch the video for inspiration, and let your passion show!
Karen Dietz's comment, April 21, 2013 1:45 PM
Thank you for all your comments/additions Mike, Alison, and Andreas.
Rescooped by Karen Dietz from Digital Storytelling
Scoop.it!

Digital Storytelling Evaluation Rubrics

Digital Storytelling Evaluation Rubrics | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Via José Carlos
Karen Dietz's insight:

I discovered this from fellow curator Jose and I thought you would find it both interesting and helpful.


The bane of storytellers and biz story professionals are decent evaluation tools. We have scant few. I'd say we don't have any at all, but I'm not aware of everything in the universe :)


How do you know a story is good? If you hear a less than compelling story, how do you know what's wrong?


The same is true for digital stories. And believe me, I view lots of digital stories and pass on most. Now I have some rubrics to help me tell you why.


Standard evaluation measures are essential -- they help build consistency and take evaluations out of the land of white-washing or personality contests.


These rubrics were developed for teachers, but any business can use them! I hope they help you as you craft your stories, and to know why a story (digital or otherwise) falls flat.


Until we have our own Roger & Ebert (so sad they are both gone now), we'll have to find rubrics where we can, eventually develop our own, and keep testing them out and refining them.

more...
ozziegontang's comment, April 10, 2013 11:12 AM
Here's a nice story from the word-detective: The Latin "rubrica" meant "red ochre" (a clay-like soil used in coloring) or red coloring itself, as used in makeup and dyes ("ruber" being the Latin word for "red").

One of the earliest uses of "rubric" in English, in the late 14th century, was in reference to the practice at the time of printing directions for the conduct of services, as well as other instructions and explanations, in red letters in religious texts. These sections of the text, designed to catch the eye and command the attention of worshipers, were known as "rubrics." This use eventually produced two other senses of "rubric," that of "an explanation or definition" and "a rule or custom of conduct."

The use of red ink to draw the reader's attention to important points was widespread in secular works as well, and "rubric" was applied to a chapter title or other heading in a book or manuscript printed in red. By the 19th century, this had produced the figurative meaning of "a designation or category"
Karen Dietz's comment, April 10, 2013 4:08 PM
Love the history of the word Ozzie! Thanks for sharing. And I knowing your metaphoric mind, yes, everything out of your mouth is a story :)
Karen Dietz's comment, April 11, 2013 11:46 AM
Thank you Ken, Cavett, and Jose for your comments! So glad you found it useful :) Have an awesome weekend.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

How to Use Metaphors for Way Better Biz Storytelling

How to Use Metaphors for Way Better Biz Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Blog post at Enchanting Marketing : You know your writing needs to stand out.

You want to inspire your readers to take action, change their beliefs, or to buy something.
[..]
Karen Dietz's insight:

If you want to jazz up your biz storytelling, make a stronger impact, and get sticky, then using mephors is really critical.


I like this article because it not only gives a definition of what a metaphor is, the author then talks about where to find them and how to add them to your blog.


Then the author Henneke, in a stroke of genius, gives us the 3 common mistakes to avoid when using metaphors. Like don't mix your metaphors or you will be confusing. Yeah! 


Have fun spicing up your stories with metaphors and experiencing the difference they can make.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

more...
Denyse Drummond-Dunn's curator insight, May 2, 2013 5:39 AM

Useful explanation of what metaphors are and why they can add spice to your storytelling. Thanks Henneke for the post and Karen for sharing.

Hamid Hameed's comment, May 2, 2013 7:17 AM
interesting
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 2, 2013 4:10 PM

The magic of metaphors.

Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Once Upon A Rock Star... Story Tips From Jimi Henrix' Ghost

Once Upon A Rock Star... Story Tips From Jimi Henrix' Ghost | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Done right, sharing information through stories makes a message sing like NOTHING else can do. I stumbled across Mark Hermann's Rock and Roll Zen blog.
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a terrific interview with musican/storyteller/blogger Mark Hermann about business storytelling.


I like his advice for website 'about' pages, his tip for going for more empathy to connect with audiences, and all of the stories he shares about his work and storytelling.


And he has terrific tips for different ways to craft stories to engage readers.


Kick back, relax, and enjoy reading this post with all the insights shared here.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

more...
Jasmin Rez's curator insight, April 30, 2013 5:37 PM

via @kdietz

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 2, 2013 4:15 PM

A picture is worth a thousand words.

Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Anecdote: The world's best business story practitioners

Anecdote: The world's best business story practitioners | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

Hey folks -- looking for a great biz story professional to help you or refer to someone else?


Then here's the list for you! My biz story colleague Shawn Callahan in Australia put together this awesome list.


I am honored to be in such great company, but frankly, I am more thrilled to see my fellow colleagues and friends on the list because I think they are awesome too. And I am happy to give them a shout out.


Everyone's website is listed by their name, so go explore. But mine is listed incorrectly, so go visit me at www.juststoryit.com 


And if you haven't heard yet, I'm writing "Business Storytelling for Dummies" with colleague Lori Silverman for Wiley Publishers that will be out this Fall. Yeah! I'll keep you posted. Right now it's nose to the grindstone to meet the writing deadlines :)


Happy day everyone!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Strategy, Storytelling, and Being a Detective

Strategy, Storytelling, and Being a Detective | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's a short, quick but powerful recounting of how my colleague Shawn Callahan is using story, story elements, and story formats to help companies articulate their strategy. It is very informative!


We need more stories like this to help us all understand how powerful working with stories can be in different applications. I love the process Shawn used. In particular I like how he encourages his clients to stay in the questioning and possibilities stage before jumping into solution finding.


This is an underlying and profound place to remain because thinking gets clearer and sharper. And better pathways emerge for implementation than searching for the immediate quick answers.


What few people realize is that this is a little recognized story dynamic. If with our own business stories, if we are able to share our stories and at the same time understand that those stories are constantly in a state of flux and flow -- where understanding about their meanings and implications evolve over time -- then both the stories and the response to our environment improves.


Relating to our stories this way means we are in a continual state of discovery. Hmmmm, is the meaning of this story changing? What is the point of the story in the context I find myself in now? What is this story really pointing to? Are there other ways to tell this story that sheds a different light on the business?


BTW -- being in this place is kind of fun. It's like being a detective in a mystery book.


In our demand for immediacy, this can be a hard position to maintain. Yet it is an essential dynamic, and a quality of excellence, in storytelling. Relating to our stories from this place is the 'art' part of storytelling instead of the 'science' part of it.


Well, I hope this article and my little review gives you lots to think about.


What are your business stories continually teaching you? How can these insights help you with your strategies and generating solutions?


Thank you Shawn for this fabulous piece and the thought-provoking questions it generates!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

more...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 29, 2013 11:22 PM
It's spam Jose! I've already deleted the multiple spam postings to my comments today.
Samantha O'Leary's curator insight, April 30, 2013 9:12 AM

How is business related to literature?  What cultural traits help us know more about our ventures?

Sarosh Daruwalla's curator insight, April 30, 2013 9:51 AM

In an era where the quick fix is often celebrated, bringing in different perspectives to the table will only enhance the final decision making to be more focused and in the right direction.

Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

How to Really Understand Someone Else's Point of View

How to Really Understand Someone Else's Point of View | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
It's a necessary prerequisite for persuasion. (Good post on how to understand another's point of view.
Karen Dietz's insight:

It's easy to say, "Hey, just tell a story and you'll start a relationship."


But if our stories do not connect to the person's real needs and issues, we are whistling in the wind.


So understanding your audience -- whether as an individual or as a group -- is critical for your biz stories to make a difference.


Which is why I selected this article. I don't find too many posts on this topic, which is one reason why I brought it in to this collection. And it is also a really good article.


The authors provide specific steps and questions to ask that will allow you to connect more directly with your audience. They will come away from the convesation/story sharing with you saying, "He/she really got me!" That's a double-entendre by the way :)


I hope you get some great ideas from this article, and that your influence skills continue to soar.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
SooJin-Stella Lee's comment, April 30, 2013 7:08 AM
Thank you ^^ I definitely need these sort of information. And I learend lots of things from your strategies to do well in scoop.it.
Karen Dietz's comment, April 30, 2013 11:47 AM
My pleasure Soo-Jin. Keep up the good work!
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 2, 2013 4:24 PM

Put yourself in the other person's shoes.

Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Igniting Word-of-Mouth Marketing With Storytelling

Igniting Word-of-Mouth Marketing With Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Storytelling is by far the most underrated skill when it comes to business. Gary Vaynerchuk, master marketer and entrepreneur Even...
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a succinct piece this is showing the significance of story sharing to promote word of mouth marketing. Which we all love and desire.


The author, Jon Thomas, gives us nice stats of results companies have experienced using stories. And I like his point that in the old advertising model, 2% conversion was the goal. Today it is 100% engagement, and that word of mouth marketing through storytelling is the way to get there.


He then goes on to talk about how to create a brand narrative. That piece of the article is a bit more conceptual with less how-to tips. But what I do like is how he suggests sharing biz stories, and then gives examples.


Near the end of the article Thomas discusses the leap companies need to take to really stimulate word of mouth marketing. It is part of offering an experience that people will share stories about. I like how that gets me thinking!


The examples shared here are really good, and I know you will benefit from them. Yeah for word of mouth marketing!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
Ellyn Winters's curator insight, April 25, 2013 1:01 PM

I'm a huge believer in storytelling in marketing, but also in sales. It is our natural form of communication in life - so why would we abandon this format when talking business? 

Jean-Marc TRESOR's curator insight, April 26, 2013 10:44 AM

Storytelling

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 2, 2013 4:08 PM

I love storytelling, listening and telling.

Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Strategic Humor: Cartoons from the May 2013 Issue

Strategic Humor: Cartoons from the May 2013 Issue | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"Now can you explain that with a parable?"

Karen Dietz's insight:

LOL -- a grin for Friday! :))

more...
malek's curator insight, April 19, 2013 11:16 AM

Thank God, it's Friday

Anna V. A. Resurreccion's curator insight, April 21, 2013 5:19 PM

This says it all.  Communication is paramount.  So get that elevator pitch down pat--you never know when you will need it.

   

Anna Resurreccion, Ph.D., CFS

President

RSR International Group, LLC

 

Rescooped by Karen Dietz from Stories - an experience for your audience -
Scoop.it!

Using storytelling to make sense of corporations in transition | SmartPlanet

Using storytelling to make sense of corporations in transition | SmartPlanet | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
BARCELONA — Spanish start-up Quimica Visual guides companies in times of transition — mergers, takeovers, bankruptcy, rapid growth —

Via Hans Heesterbeek
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is a wonderful article about how consulting firm Quimica Visual works with corporations with storytelling to help them change their cultures.


Quimica Visual's co-founders are Eva Snijders and Montecarlo. I've come to know and respect Eva quite a bit through my curation process. 


What I like about this post is the model they share, along with their experiences of working with storytelling and other art forms in their work with clients. Anytime we can have windows into other people's work, we benefit. So many thanks for sharing!


Enjoy this quick piece, and get a taste of what colleagues/story professionals are doing in Europe.


And many thanks to fellow curator Hans Heesterbeck for finding and sharing this piece.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Karen Dietz from Story and Narrative
Scoop.it!

How Stories are Changing: Why Living in the Present Is a Disorder

How Stories are Changing: Why Living in the Present Is a Disorder | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"R.U. Sirius: You describe five symptoms — pathologies, really — of “presentist” culture. One of these is “narrative collapse.” Can you explain it for those who haven’t read the book?


Douglas Rushkoff: Narrative Collapse is what happens when we no longer have time in which to tell a story."

 

[Image: HBO]


Via Gregg Morris
Karen Dietz's insight:

ooooh, ooooh, ooooh -- here's a piece about storytelling, technology, and 'presentism' that will get you thinking.


Are we experienceing 'narrative collapse'? This is an interivew with Douglas Rushkoff, author of Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now. Rushkoff makes the case that our daily and moment-by-moment interactions with technology are leading to us being always in the present where everything demands our attention and where we are caught up in responding immediately (I probably stated that poorly, but you get the idea).


He goes on to say that this tyranny has some good aspects, and some not so good results. One of them is that our stories are changing.


Over the last few years, when people say to me that storytelling is changing -- that digital storytelling and transmedia storytelling is radically altering stories -- I seriously question the supposition.


Rushkoff is the first one who is making sense about this, and it is the first time that I can say, "Sure, this is happening."


Narrative collapse is when video games and role playing fantasies keep a story going without ever ending it. There is no conclusion. And TV shows are becoming similar -- where there is no conclusion, there is no real protagonist, and the story line is not building to a climax. Think Game of Thrones or Once Upon A Time. Lots of mini-climaxes and cliff-hangers, but resolution never ever comes. For me it's exhausting and I've stopped watching shows like that.


But there are other points Rushkoff makes about story shifting away from finalizing victories into sustainable experiences. Hmmmm -- you'll have to read the article yourself to form your own opinion. For sure, he presents a very balanced view about "presentism" and narratives chaning, pointing out advantages and disadvantages of both.


For myself, I am much more optimistic. Yes, technology is reshaping how we live. And I think it is also reshaping our brain. But when I canvas the whole of the human experience, I still see stories -- and the human dynamics of storytelling in all their glory -- alive and well.


I still love how this article makes me pause and reflect. There is more to this article too about oppression, dropping out, the difficulty in managing multiple realities, etc. What do YOU think about all of this?


Many thanks to fellow curator Gregg Morris for finding and sharing this!

more...
Justine Pardoen's comment, April 19, 2013 6:36 PM
Reading the book is worthwhile!
Karen Dietz's comment, April 24, 2013 6:51 PM
Good to know Justine!
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Doing the Impossible Story: Saving Polaroid Film & Cameras

Doing the Impossible Story: Saving Polaroid Film & Cameras | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
A Polaroid camera is nothing more than bookshelf eye candy if you don't have the magical film to go with it. Which is why The Impossible Project pulle...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is a little bit of inspiration for your Friday.


It's all about how a couple of crazy guys bought the last Polaroid film factory so that 300 million cameras around the globe could still be used.


Now how different is that?! And they succeeded, and are successful. It's a terrific little story.


Other than for your own inspiration, how could you use this story? How about when talking with teams about thinking outside the box. Or when working with executives about hidden market opportunities. Or anytime you are dealing with the principles of creativity and innovation. Just a few ideas :)


Enjoy this piece and have fun!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
Verone Medley Travis's curator insight, April 14, 2013 5:51 PM

Polaroids bring back a lot of memories for a lot of people. Glad to hear that the magic will continue.

Karen Dietz's comment, April 21, 2013 1:44 PM
Yes, I was sad about the demise of Polaroid and so glad there's still life beyond digital photography.
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

Listening to Needs in Your Customer's Stories

Listening to Needs in Your Customer's Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Moving beyond just hearing, to listening is an important skill to refine.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Today I'm curating 2 articles on an essential storytelling skill -- listening.


I like this first article because it makes the point that when we are evoking and listening to the stories of our prospects and customers, our ears need to be tuned to listening for their needs.


It's easy to get caught up in the drama of the story. But while you are listening, are you also trying to hear what needs are being expressed?


Connecting with the needs of customers/prospects is where all the gold is. If the stories you share in return do not connect with those needs, your business does not grow.


There's a handy chart that helps explain this, and some helpful perspectives.


But the article left me wondering, "So how do I really listen for those needs? What do I have to do that I'm not doing now?"


So the next article focuses on those how-to tips.


Happy listening!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

more...
streetsmartprof's comment, April 12, 2013 8:03 AM
Great finds for those of us in customer facing roles, which is every employee, some-way, some-how.
Karen Dietz's comment, April 12, 2013 3:12 PM
Many thanks for the additional review and comment! Love the way you think :)
Ken Jondahl's comment, April 12, 2013 6:13 PM
Driven in to me by many years of battle scares of what works and what doesn't...
Scooped by Karen Dietz
Scoop.it!

The 10 Principles of Listening to Customer Stories

Listening Skills are essential in any interpersonal relationship and for all interpersonal communication. Learn about the 10 principles of listening and improve your commuication skills.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Saying we need to listen for customer needs is one thing, but how do you actually do that?


This article gives us 10 tips for how to listen so we gain insight into customer and prospect needs.


And also I like the chart about how much time we spend communicating and listening. It really shows how we in business need to listen more!


Want to see better results in your business? Focus on listening....


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/tjust-story-it 

more...
malek's curator insight, April 11, 2013 7:11 PM

How to use "active listening" to make a conscious effort to hear and understand what customers are saying.

Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's curator insight, April 12, 2013 12:24 AM

Good skills for both work and home.


"If speaking is silver, then listening is gold." - Proverb

Karen Dietz's comment, April 18, 2013 2:56 PM
Thank you for the comments Malek & Brian! And I love the proverb your shared :)

Just Story It Newsletter

Sign up for my rather infrequent newsletter