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Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Growing executive's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com  619-235-0052
Curated by Karen Dietz
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Social Storytelling: How Brands Are Streaming Stories | MSLGROUP ...

Social Storytelling: How Brands Are Streaming Stories | MSLGROUP ... | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

“I had to know and understand my own story before I could listen to and help other people with theirs.” - Barack Obama, US President


“Once people make your story their story, you have tapped into ‘faith’.” - Seth Godin, US entrepreneur, author, public speaker 


This article is a little long, but it is a gem. It's focus is to highlight the various ways storytelling in marketing/branding has become more complex. And the author Dominic Payling gives us some ways to think about this complexity that helps us untangle storytelling in this area.


Truly, storytelling is creating fundamental change in the marketing and branding field. Payling lays this out, and offers us information about new patterns of attention that have emerged with the use of technology and the internet.


Payling doesn't offer any specific solutions, but clearer thinking about the evolution of working with stories in marketing/branding and some of the unique characteristcs that are emerging is always welcome.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 20, 2012 10:10 AM
This is an article which serves as an inspiration to everyone in terms marketing, branding and the use of the internet. It is promoting the power of technology to our everyday lives.
Karen Dietz's comment, September 20, 2012 12:36 PM
Thank you Victoria! Glad you got so much out of it :)
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Companies With The Best Stories Win: 10 Key Points For Telling Your Story - Forbes

Companies With The Best Stories Win: 10 Key Points For Telling Your Story - Forbes | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Winning entrepreneurs bond emotionally with employees, investors and customers--and dramatically increase their chances for funding and for long term success--when they hone their ability to tell meaningful stories about their businesses.


Here is an article discussing 2 examples of effective business storytelling for marketing/branding/identity purposes that really work. One is a small business (Baby Steals) and the other one is a large enterpriese (IKEA). You will notice the difference in their stories as the size of the business kicks in.


Pay close attention to what the founder of Baby Steals did/does -- because implicit in the example shared are story listening skills and how the stories she was hearing from customers/prospects also shaped the success of her company.


And then there are 10 tips for bringing storytelling into your business marketing/branding efforts. All are solid. A word of advice here -- working on several of these 10 tips takes time. The ideas you come up with during your first pass you will want to test with friends, colleagues, customers, and prospects. This is an iterative process where your focus and messaging gets sharper, clearer, and more powerful over time. So give yourself the opportunity to play. This goes no matter what size of business you have -- micro to large enteprise.


We are heading into the 4th quarter of the year -- what a great time to hone in on your business storytelling, laying a stronger foundation for your company in 2013.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her collection of articles on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Ken Morrison's comment, September 5, 2012 8:49 PM
Thank you for the recent rescoops! Hope you are having a nice weei.
Ken
Carole Pyke - The Business Bard's curator insight, April 15, 2013 4:53 PM

just testing

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Supercharge Your Brand With An Emotional Selling Point Story

Supercharge Your Brand With An Emotional Selling Point Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

In a competitive market like Singapore, many businesses are struggling to market their products or services among others. With a limited budget, many business owners might perceive branding as a good-to-have or only for companies that are cash rich.


Here's what I love about this article -- the author's advice that these days, a business does not need a Unique Selling Point (USP) but an Emotional Selling Point (ESP) for branding and marketing instead.


What a good point! I also like his sage advice to craft an attitude and a belief. 


Read the article for more insights on how to incorporate his ideas into your business. It's a short read, but worth it!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Brands: Stop Publishing Content on Facebook! - Integrated Storytelling

Brands: Stop Publishing Content on Facebook! - Integrated Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
No, this isn't another 'Facebook as a disappointment' story. It's about how we best use Facebook or, more broadly, our content marketing. With over 3.5 Billion pieces of content shared each week on Facebook, brands first impulse is to jump...


This article doesn't sound like it is about storytelling -- but it is.


What I like about it is the author's sage words of advice: quit publishing random content on Facebook (or any other social media platform) and start publishing content that tells an integrated story.


In other words, think of yourself as a curator, selecting only the best value-added content for your channels that reflects a consistent story about your business and what you offer. And stop the scatter-shot approach.


And don't worry if you are not sure what 'story' you need to tell consistently. You don't have to figure it all out now.  In truth, your 'editorial voice' will emerge over the first few weeks/months and get stronger/clearer as you go along.


So think deeply about the insights shared in this article, and about your business storytelling. Check and see if you need to shift your focus, eliminate any deadwood, and strength your 'story' so it is more consistent.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Visual aid for a story-based evaluation method

Visual aid for a story-based evaluation method | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

These illustrations are computer generated maps of the overlap between how an organization describes itself (to donors) and how storytellers describe the organization or some relevant social problem.

WOW -- what a great article! Using story word maps we can now do gap analyses showing the differences (or similarities) between the stories an organization tells about itself and the stories a community, customers, or the press share about it. This is so cool!

As this article demonstrates with the organizations they analyzed, you can clearly see where the intersections a, where the gaps are, and where the missed opportunities are. The author uses visual word maps to show us the results. The fact that the results are visual is fabulous! And easy to grasp/Interpret.

Oh, I can't wait to start playing with this. It doesn't appear as if there are easy tools yet to do this, so generating the word maps will take time and effort. But I think well worth it.

Any app developers out there who can take this and run with it? I hope so.

In the meantime, start thinking about how you can apply these principles and visuals to your biz story work. I can't wait to see your results!

Thank you to colleague and fellow curator Kat Hansen for finding and sharing this article.

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


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5 Places To Look For Your Brand's Story

5 Places To Look For Your Brand's Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
5 Places To Look For Your Brand's Story - 07/17/2012 (RT @BrandSquare: 5 Places To Look For Your #Brand's Story http://t.co/39Ush3XY #branding #storytelling...)...


Not sure how to get started in crafting your brand story? Here's a piece by Jim Signorelli with 5 tips on where to starting looking for the qualities and elements you want your brand story to embody. And don't forget his last tip -- ask your customers!


Start answering the questions Jim poses and it will make crafting and sharing your brand story much easier -- and just remember -- your brand story is made up of a set of stories that you get to share and tell, IMHO.


The creation of a 'grand narrative' -- a mono-story -- that reflects ALL you are about is passe and not as workable as in the past. We are moving away from the 'grand narrative' notion to the understanding of the power of sets of micro-stories -- even in marketing. This article really does not address this issue, so just keep this in the back of your mind as you are digging for your stories.


There is value in distilling these stories down to a workable few. So dig into these 5 places, have fun, and see what you come up with!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Six Characteristics of Highly Persuasive Stories | Neuromarketing

Six Characteristics of Highly Persuasive Stories | Neuromarketing | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
One of the toughest persuasion tasks is convincing a jury in a courtroom. Car salespeople have it easy by comparison – they control the environment and have the undivided attention of the customer.


What a great piece this is! I really like the story elements they identify for pesuasive storytelling, and explaining all using their experience in the courtroom. 


All their points are extremely relevant for understanding the crafting and sharing of business stories for marketing.


And read down to the last paragraph -- that's where the real gold is!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


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Soundcloud explores the four effects sound has on...

Soundcloud explores the four effects sound has on... | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Soundcloud explores the four effects sound has on us – physiological, psychological, cognitive, and behavioral – in a concrete complement to their wonderful abstract short film, Sound.


So cool! Think of audio branding to get the maximum out of this video.


In our business storytelling it is too easy to get caught up in the visuals. But what about sound?


This is a great primer on how sound affects us and will get you thinking about the necessity for adding sound to your visual storytelling for high-impact and memorable pieces.


Enjoy!


Original link:

http://exp.lore.com/post/21208635527/soundcloud-explores-the-four-effects-sound-has-on 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What a Lemonade Stand Taught Me About Storytelling

What a Lemonade Stand Taught Me About Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
I was on my way to play golf this past weekend when I drove by a young girl selling lemonade on the sidewalk in front of her house.


On the surface this quick article with 2 videos to share looks like it is the same old story -- storytelling is essential for successful marketing, sales, and business growth.


But there are 2 key -- yet subtle -- messages buried in the videos.


In the video with Seth Godin, he makes the point that not only do you have to have a good story, but you also have to create a product/service that combines both a need people are already hungry for and that also captures their imagination. Stories are your gateway because if you design your product/service and your business around the stories you want people to share about you, you will have a leg-up on  your competition. This is quite a notion and different to how we typically do business today.


In the second video, the Danish author Rolf Jensen shares with us a story that makes his point: people buy the story, not the product/service. And that storytelling is the future of business development.


The article is short, as are the videos.  But the insights are golden and will last a lifetime!


Article link: 

http://www.business2community.com/branding/what-a-lemonade-stand-taught-me-about-storytelling-0205747


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How To Move Your Brand From Good Enough To Remarkable

How To Move Your Brand From Good Enough To Remarkable | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
You've got great people on your team and you have a strong vision for the future. So does everybody else. What you need to work on is getting remarkable.


Yep, I couldn't agree more. So how do you get started? Well, first by digging into stories. That's advice tip number one from the author.


Next, get this story work out of the exclusive domain of marketing. Now this point I really like because it is rarely acknowledge. But true it is.


And finally, if your stories are lacking, or broken, or problematic in any way -- fix them! That happens in part through working with trained story workers. So look around you for help.


As the author says, "...then you have to jump in and get to work on being remarkable. It might be the difference between surviving or thriving in 2012 and beyond."


I am looking forward to hearing about more remarkable organizations.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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The Danger of a Single Story

The Danger of a Single Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.


OMG -- what an amazing video! It is about 12 minutes long -- and eloquent plus thought-provoking. It is inspiring and heartfelt. I know this will feed you well.


Here is how to view it through the lense of small business, enterprises, non-profit work, or social cause entrepreneurship:

  • There is not one story, but multiple stories of different people that together create or organization -- whether you are a sole proprietor, nonprofit or a multinational corporation. You would think that is obvious, but I can't tell you how frequently people come to me for their 'story' -- their one, defining story. But thinking that way is dangerous and extremely limiting -- and untimately not successful as this Chimamanda explains. There are your stories, stories of customers, stories of partners, stories of staff, stories of stakeholders, etc...


  • The tone of today's marketing/branding efforts reflects more the shallowness of story instead of its depth. Depth comes from the many stories, not the 'one'. We instead must engage with ALL the stories otherwise we rob people of their dignity, respect and humanity. That thievery does not create meaningful relationships -- and we are all in the age of relationship building/sustaining if you haven't figured that out yet. 


  • Over-storying happens all the time -- to silence different voices for the sake of efficiency. The result? Stereotypes that while true, are woefully incomplete. This ultimately creates an inability to reach and engage with more people/markets in your business.


  • Stories in organizations and public life can be used to dispossess and malign (our current political climate?) or to bring together and empower. There are dangers in storytelling -- yes, even in business -- and care must be taken so we hear and can operate from a balance of stories for the health and well-being of the organization.


In the end, your success in working with stories for engagement, connection and meaningful relationship is all about awareness, intent, and deep listening -- and getting really smart about the power of storytelling. Enjoy watching this video about the depth, richness, and beauty of storytelling that will help you truly engage with those around you.


As Chimamanda says at the end, reject the single story and regain a kind of paradise.


Many thanks to Gregg Morris who originally curated this for his Story and Narrative scoop.it.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


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Karen Dietz's comment, June 12, 2012 10:40 AM
Many many thanks for finding and scooping this Gregg! It is awesome and I've downloaded it into my personal collection also. Wonderful, wonderful ...
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Empowerment Marketing [Storytelling]: Advertising To Humans As More Than Just Selfish Machines

Empowerment Marketing [Storytelling]: Advertising To Humans As More Than Just Selfish Machines | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Editor’s NoteThis is the first of three excerpts that we’re running from Winning the Story Wars: Why Those Who Tell--and Live--the Best Stories Will Rule the Future by Jonah Sachs, the cofounder of Free Range Studios (the creative studio behind The...


Well, I am totally not crazy about this whole business of the 'Story Wars' and continue to find this framing about war and battles very limiting. And what I find amusing about the author's premise here is that for all of us to be successful in business, we need to move away from appealing to people's baser natures (like war?) and focus on empowering stories and advertising. Yet when you are in a battle, there are only winners and losers -- and extreme debilitating costs.  So while the metaphor totally does not work here, the ideas presented do.


I hardly find war empowering. Nevertheless, this article makes some great points. Take some time here -- between the text and the videos and additional links, there is lots to explore.


As a Folklorist, interestingly enough I am not wild about his Vimeo on "Winning the Story Wars - The Myth Gap". I hardly find that advertisers have been the mythologists of our age. I think people from the advertising world may think so however! So take that whole notion with a grain of salt please.


What's the bottom line here? Appeal to hope, courage, empowerment, community, and anything that enlivens us, expands our experiences, and calls us to something greater.


Surely we can all do this in our business storytelling!


Review written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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7 Universal Truths for Ensuring Brand Relevance (all are story skills)

7 Universal Truths for Ensuring Brand Relevance (all are story skills) | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The refrain’s all too familiar. We live in a time of radical transparency and thanks to the rise of social media, brands are now co-owned. Look no further than the recent twitstorms engulfing Kenneth Cole (spring collection causes Cairo uprising?


What is effective branding? It's all laid out right here. And better yet -- each one of these elements are also essential storytelling skills.


Hooray! No story, no brand. As my favorite storyteller Elizabeth Ellis says, "The storyteller's role is to comfort the afflicted and afflict the comforted." That does not ALWAYS hold true for biz storytelling but this saying certainly applies here when the author advocates for "Be The Cause" and "Be A Catalyst For Change." Frankly, I think if more companies took this advice there would be more win-win in the marketplace.


I also like the examples share in this post.


So grab these points, take them to heart, and create an awesome brand.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her Just Story It Scoops at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf 


I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.


This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.


Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 


3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.


5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


  1. If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories.
  2. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently.
  3. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master,
  4. Know what a story is and is not
  5. Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.


Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 1:15 PM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 4:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 4:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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The Future Of Storytelling: Immersion, Integration, Interactivity, Impact

The Future Of Storytelling: Immersion, Integration, Interactivity, Impact | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

As technology becomes more advanced and more accessible across multiple platforms, it’s only natural for consumers to expect increasingly higher standards of creativity and engagement from content creators. Experimentation is all well and good, but what do audiences actually want? To answer this question, research group Latitude has interviewed 158 early adopters and compiled a report that forms the first phase of its The Future of Storytelling project.

 

This article popped up today and I really like the 4 "I's" that it says the best business stories bring to the table: immersion, integration, interactivity, and impact. All stories, if told really well, do this. They immerse the audience and teller in the experience of the story, facilitate integration of messages, are co-created experiences that often generate story sharing back-and forth (interactivity), and have an impact on both the teller and the audience.


These 4 "I's" I really like -- they help capture the intent and purpose of our business storytelling. If your stories are not hitting all 4 dimensions, go fix them!


The author Martin Bryant is framing his points here in the world of transmedia storytelling -- where stories are told across multiple technology formats. The results of the study shared here contain no surprises if one is familiar with the dynamics of storytelling however.


For example: people influencing the media or producers in the creation of stories. Well, that's been happen for a hundreds of years now. Yet I do agree that the rate and amount of access has increased with technology, all of which is a good thing.


So what's the take-away here? 


First -- focus on the 4 "I's" in any business storytelling you do in order to be successful. And expand your notions of what Interactivity, immersion, and integration can be. The info shared in the article might spark some ideas for you. If you are in business, are a blogger or content creator of any time, take these 4 "I's" to heart and do more of them.


Second -- stay tuned for the next part of this report that looks very promsing: "Latitude is currently working on phase two of its study, which it describes as “a large-scale international exploration focused on quantifying storytelling trends and opportunities, and understanding key audiences for multi-platform and transmedia experiences.”


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Oreo image goes viral, offering lessons in branding & visual storytelling

Oreo image goes viral, offering lessons in branding & visual storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
To mark its 100th anniversary, Oreo is posting an image a day for 100 days. A recent picture marking the Mars Rover landing achieved viral gold. Here are the takeaways.


Now here's an article that should get your creative juices flowing! Got an image for your company that you can alter to link to world events or commemorative days?


That is what Oreo has done for its cookie. The photo here commemorates the Mars Rover landing (the red planet). Ingenious! This article by Michael Sebastian explains how Oreo keeps playing with its cookie to make it  immediately relevant. It's fun. It's play. The photos go viral.


Is this storytelling? Not in the classical sense. It is a visual story trigger -- which can be very effective.


Surely you can do something like this! Think about it .....  :))


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Finding the Human Element in Food Storytelling | @ppetite

Finding the Human Element in Food Storytelling | @ppetite | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

There’s lots of debate these days about “local food.” Is it better tasting, or better for you? Does it offer a viable economic model? Is it a fad? The answers to those and other pointed questions are best answered elsewhere. But, as a writer and consumer of food media I can tell you one thing with certainty. The local food movement has completely changed the way we tell stories about food. As the local farmer has found a voice, the narrative has shifted. Food is no longer an impersonal commodity. More often, it is a customized, nurtured, hand-crafted product created by a passionate and invested individual.


Here's a terrific article about how market forces and storytelling is changing marketing and branding. In this case, the author Tom Barritt is talking about the food industry.


I like how Tom chronicles this shift, and the food industry offers a great example. The key to this shift? Finding the human element in your stories. For maximum effect, your stories are not about the product, or the 'brand', but about people.


Take a lesson here for better business storytelling and enjoy better results!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Why Collaborative Storytelling Is The Future Of Marketing | Fast Company

Why Collaborative Storytelling Is The Future Of Marketing | Fast Company | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

For the last decade or so, there’s been a gradual shift in how marketers think about stories. Beyond thinking about how the brand tells the story, they’re increasingly focused on how people share the story of the brand.


What is the future of business storytelling? It's not story sharing. It's story making!


This is a quick article by John Coleman about the shift in marketing away from storytelling (past) to story sharing (present) to story making (future).


He's got some good points here and shares ideas about how this is going to manifest.


Enjoy this perspective and then start thinking about how you can make this shift.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Five Principles for Storytelling in a Multi-Screening World

The increase in multi-screening, coupled with time spent on social channels, means content creation strategies need to evolve.


Here is a quick SlideShare piece that does a nice job explaining how businesses (small and large) need to take advantage of sharing their business stories across platforms for maximum impact.


What I like are the visuals that quickly convey the different 'screens' (computer, cell phone, etc.) for sharing stories, how to think about them, and then how to start taking action.


Truly, it is a complex marketing world we face out there these days and we can use all the insights we can find. I hope these slides bring an insight or two for how you can continue moving forward and use your stories more effectively.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


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How To Build Positive Marketing Stories That Work

How To Build Positive Marketing Stories That Work | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Editor’s NoteThis is the third and final excerpt that we’re running from Winning the Story Wars: Why Those Who Tell--and Live--the Best Stories Will Rule the Future by Jonah Sachs, the cofounder of Free Range Studios (the creative studio behind The...


First -- I'm finally back curating after spending 5 days facilitting 2 back-to-back corporate retreats on story processes and tools for organizational change. They were both awesome and successful!


I mention this to not only explain my absence, but also as a lead-in to this piece.


This article is a long read, so take your time. It is written by marketing guy Jonah Sachs, the author of a recently released book "Winning The Story Wars..."  


Here is what I like about the article: it explains how our brain is wired for stories, and how to leverage 3 elements to create positive marketing stories: Freaks, Familiars, and Cheats. He then goes on to use 2 viral videos as examples to support his thinking. It is a good discussion and examination of the power of these little recognized elements in creating successful stories that engage. I love that he brings these 3 elements into our awareness!


Now here is where I have a few issues. One -- Sachs continually misses the underlying fundamental dynamic as to why these 3 elements work in marketing. That element is deep play. As human beings, play is fundamental to our existence. Deep play is when we are so engaged and enthralled with and immersed in an event (whether it be a video, game, work, or a parade) that we lose ourselves. This can be an experience that lasts only a few minutes, or several hours. Understanding the concept and experience of deep play is essential to understanding why these 3 elements of Freak, Familiar, and Cheat work.


When we use stories in organizational change work, understanding these dynamics is key to success. "Freaks" are those people we call 'positive deviants' -- they have discovered unique ways to implement a process successfully while others have not. "Familiars" are those we build tribes with in organizations, and "Cheaters" are those who have either broken out of the system, or who we use as cautionary tales of 'what not to do.'


Two -- this whole story 'wars' metaphor. I really have a problem with this because it pits us into win-lose scenarios that ultimately leads to significant ethical problems -- like using stories for oppression, and over-storying where one story dominates and drowns out another's story usually at the expense of truth, validity, innovation, creativity, etc.


Linking stories and war is not helpful when a business is trying to build value, a Unique Selling Proposition, be innovative, create change, etc., even though that dynamic is played out all the time (think of how people pitch their stories against each other in war, politics, religion, etc.).


War is a dominant metaphor that we rarely question, but that gets us into lots of trouble eventually -- typically with huge costs at the end. Think about the consequences of using the notion of 'story wars' in organizational change. Yikes!!


I bring this up so we can THINK better about what we are doing, and use our stories wisely, to enrich our lives but not at the expense of others. So we can THINK through the ethical and practical limitations of this metaphor. So we can find better ways to language and create our world.


Words create worlds. Stories create worlds. Use them wisely.


OK -- enough preaching :)  Go play with these ideas of Freaks, Familiars, and Cheats to build engaging stories that engage people in deep play!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Dealing with Internet fragmentation: The power of storytelling for brands

Dealing with Internet fragmentation: The power of storytelling for brands | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

2012 Global Players takes a look back at how corporate websites have evolved over the past year, to uncover why today it’s imperative for businesses to invest more time, imagination and resources in creating a corporate narrative.


Now here's an interesting article! The material that peeked my interest the most dealt with how the Internet creates fragmented stories which leads to businesses losing control over their narrative.


But then the article goes on to suggest that the typical ways companies create their websites does not work anymore in this fragmented environment.


Then the authors offer a link to a free downloadable study that show what companies can do to combat this fragmentation, develop and share their narrative, and succeed in today's Internet world -- with examples!


I checked out the study and it looks really good. I think as I study it I'll get lots of ideas for re-tooling the website which is going under another iteration of improvements.


I bet you will learn a lot too!


Original link: 

http://www.berghindjoseph.com/knowledge-bank/2012/06/exclusive-study-the-power-of-storytelling


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Not Just for Bedtime, Marketers Corner the Market on Storytelling - Forbes

Not Just for Bedtime, Marketers Corner the Market on Storytelling - Forbes | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
While technology continues to drive emerging forms of communications, it's ironic that the hottest trend in marketing today just might be the ancient art of storytelling. And that doesn't mean that all the stories being told are any good.


LOL -- I don't know if marketers have cornered the market on storytelling but there sure is a revolution going on in their world as they continue to leverage the power of storytelling.


Here's what I like about this article -- it's emphasis on crafting really great stories. And it is rare to find such candid remarks about this. But this author calls a spade a spade. Yes!


The author, Phil Johnson drives this point home and shares his experiences at recent conferences with bad storytelling.


He then gives marketers 3 tips for how to do it right.


Enjoy this quick read and keep crafting great stories!

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How to Become a Content Marketing Hero by Emulating Apple and Subway

How to Become a Content Marketing Hero by Emulating Apple and Subway | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

As we saw last time, your startup becomes a hero by making your customers and clients the main hero. And rather than starting with trying to sell our ultimate products or services, we attract and mentor our prospects with content first.


If you are going to use the hero model in your biz storytelling, then you are going to want to read this article (I say that because there are other story models available).


I really like the examples and videos from Apple, Inc. this author uses to illustrate his points -- they are very powerful. 


And I think the chart is brilliant. He also explains the structure for creating a hero story -- and focuses on the hero being your CUSTOMER, not you.


That is sometimes hard to get your head wrapped around, which is another reason why I like the examples & videos he chose. You will really experience the difference.


So go grab these insights and happy storytelling!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


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Karen Dietz's comment, June 14, 2012 2:39 PM
Many many thanks! You have made my day/weekend! :))
VIDEOWORLD's comment, June 14, 2012 2:50 PM
And you made mine also, it energized me beyond the normal "like it" my whole breakfast with my son was talking enthusiastically about the article , because the "Hero Journey" although a cliché has to be interiorized to apply it firmly and softly, and yor curation and the article are real examples of the long journey we have to achieve , more in the tradition of the Dao (wu wei) it has to apperar natural and effortless (although we know there is a lot of effort in achieving it)
Karen Dietz's comment, June 14, 2012 3:08 PM
You are so right Jose (I hope I have your name correct -- please illuminate me if not)! It takes work, effort and patience and to really be effective at this, must be internalized. I think the mono-myth of the hero does us a dis-service in many ways because it is not the only way to operate in the world. Yet I appreciated this article because it does such a good job of shifting the focus away from our own hero stories to those of our customers -- which will create much deeper relationships and meaning for us, them, and those hearing the stories. I'm glad it sparked such a fruitful conversation between you and your son!
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Marketing Needs a New Metaphor -- Telling Better Stories

Marketing Needs a New Metaphor -- Telling Better Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Last month, I learned what Dian Fossey must have felt like in Gorillas in the Mist, surrounded by mysterious creatures and unknown dangers, and yet compelled to edge ever closer.


This article proves my point EXACTLY about my criticisms of framing storytelling as a war (see the article and my review on "Empowerment Marketing") -- or any marketing as a war or battle.


I just posted a review of another article on the 'Story Wars' material that has just hit the scene ("Empowerment Marketing"). The author makes great points, but the framing of war totally undermines his basic premis.


Here's the article that explains why -- and offers a different metaphor to use to shape our marketing.


How we think about our marketing and our business storytelling shapes our actions and the types of stories we tell. So read this article's points about a better alternative metaphor to war. Everyone will benefit!


PS -- an don't forget to read the many comments posted at the end of this article. Very illuminating!


Review written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Four Ways Brands Can Build Better Relationships (via story sharing)

Four Ways Brands Can Build Better Relationships (via story sharing) | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Is your brand focused on transactions or interactions?


Why is this article showing up in this collection on biz storytelling?


Because the 4 ways brands can build relationships gets done through effective storytelling.


I love the 4 points made here in this quick read: branding is about building relationships to generate business, not pushing messages to make sales.


As a result, the game is now about human interactions instead of product transactions. What is the most effective way to promote human interaction? Story sharing!


This leads to point #4 -- relationships allow for organic discovery -- about your product/service, customer needs/likes/wants, potential innovations, new markets, etc.. The best vehicle for allowing organic discovery is story sharing.


Read the rest of the insights here. They make tons of sense. And if you like the ideas but want to know how to implement them -- then bring story sharing (telling your biz stories and listening to the stories of others in return) into your daily work life.


This is a game-changer.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her Just Story It Scoops at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Karen Dietz's comment, May 31, 2012 7:04 PM
Thanks for re-scooping the article Jeff! Have a great rest of the week :)