Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Growing leader's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com  619-235-0052
Curated by Karen Dietz
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Corporate Storytelling--The Art

Corporate Storytelling--The Art | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"Most managers are experts at crafting PowerPoint presentations, or producing reams of data analysis in meetings. But we also know that more than half the people in a conference room are daydreaming..."

Karen Dietz's insight:

Ay yi yi -- this article I really like, and then parts of it make me say, "Danger danger Will Robinson!" (for all of you Lost In Space vintage TV show geeks).


I love the introduction to the article about how business storytelling is so critical. And I like many of the types of stories that people can tell that the author mentions. 


I get a little concerned however when we are encouraged to tell tall tales where we exaggerate what happened; when we tell stories about the boss to brown nose; or when we share 'ain't it awful' stories about the org. Maybe the author was trying to use a bit of humor here and pull our leg. Hard to tell.


So be careful will tall tales and stories about the boss. You don't want to fib and you do want to be authentic. People can always tell if you are embellishing beyond what is necessary, so be careful you don't lose your credibility.


As a consultant, the 'ain't it awful' stories are a dime a dozen and easy to come by. But those stories won't help your business move forward. So know they are there, but there are better places to put your attention.


The other categories are great and I like how the author writes. And I like the reminders about biz storytelling here :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Annette Simmons's comment, June 17, 2013 10:26 AM
You got to admire this guys honesty!
Imparafacile's curator insight, June 17, 2013 11:47 AM

Se devi fare una presentazione, allora crea una storia

Karen Dietz's comment, June 19, 2013 3:48 PM
LOL Annette -- yes you do. And he's from another country where different rules apply I'm sure. So that has to be taken into consideration too :)
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20 + Tips for Optimizing Speaking Skills & Presentations

20 + Tips for Optimizing Speaking Skills & Presentations | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Improve audience engagement and sharing by optimizing your public speaking and presentations with these 20 plus tips.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Not a professional speaker but got a presentation coming up? Looking for some new ideas or tips for putting it together?


Then this article is for you! It's a quick read with lots of suggestions. Some I was familiar with, some not. If you are an old had at presentations, maybe this will refresh your memory of some tips you've forgotten. For the rest of us, the tips will give us new ideas for crafting our next presentation.


And don't forget to share stories :)


I hope you get inspired and have great results!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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LucaVanin's curator insight, June 15, 2013 4:23 AM

Questo è l'obiettivo anche del Corso che terrò in luglio: Presenta Davvero!
Ecco il link: http://www.insegnalo.it/corso-online/item/presenta-davvero

Terri Pawer's curator insight, June 17, 2013 10:27 AM

Great tips for getting the most mileage out of a tremednous amount of work.  Very relevant ideas.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 24, 2013 2:58 PM
Thank you Malek, Luca and Terri for your comments. Glad the article is proving helpful!
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Successful 21st-Century Brands Help Create Meaningful Lives

Successful 21st-Century Brands Help Create Meaningful Lives | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"Your customers are beginning to take a quantum leap into an era where a life meaningfully well lived is what really counts."

Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here is an interesting article showing how branding is continually evolving into meaningful interactions with customers.


I curated this article -- not only because it shows us what is happening today and tomorrow with branding -- but because business storytelling is the link. Effective compelling meaningful storytelling is how to make this future possible.


Well, I think it is a desirable future to aspire to. Others might disagree. That's okay. And if you, your business, your organization desire to connect with customers who focus on creating a meaningful life well lived then pay attention to this article. It has lots of great insights.


Storytelling is a very powerful meaning-making medium. The stories you select to share -- and evoke from others -- will either help the business and customers create more meaning or not, depending on your intention and your ability to craft and deliver great content.


The choice is yours -- check out this picture of the future.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Frédéric Rochet's curator insight, August 12, 2013 3:54 PM

an increasing group of companies is striving--intentionally or not--to focus on improving lives

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Storytelling w/ Data: What Are the Audience Impacts?

Storytelling w/ Data: What Are the Audience Impacts? | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Storytelling with data visualization is still very much in its “Wild West” phase, with journalism outlets blazing new paths in exploring the burgeoning craft of integrating the testimony of data together with compelling narrative.

Karen Dietz's insight:

This article is a little heady but fascinating. I love eavesdropping in on other fields to see the effects storytelling is having, and to understand how we are grappling with similar issues. And to understand what their contributions might be!


This is a perfect example. Data visualization or data storytelling or data narratives is a hot topic today. The internet is littered with smart, funny, interesting, or very dense infographics that we pass around like hot cakes.


For many years data-visualization has focused on how to take data and visually display it so it is easily understandable. Lately they want the data to tell a story, but haven't yet explored adding story structure and story elements into their end products very much. And they interchange the words narrative and storytelling a lot thinking they mean the same thing (not all narratives are stories: think Wikipedia entry).


Nevertheless, their efforts are admirable and I enjoy keeping tabs on this field. And what I like about this article is that it is beginning to ask two critical questions -- what effects do our data visualizations have on our audiences; and how do we measure that?


So the author, Nick Diakopoulos, identifies elements that story conveys that we are very familiar with: learning, memorability, insights, engagement, sharing, conversation, credibility, persuasiveness, emotional responses, etc. The author forgot 'taking action' :)


Fascinating! I love this because as people in the field of data visualization entertain these questions, how they organize and display their material is going to change and become more 'storied'.


Why else is this article important? Well, because I bet folks creating infographics can learn a lot from us biz storytellers. And likewise, I think that these brilliant data folks will come up with nifty techology solutions about audience reactions that business storytellers will be able to benefit from. And that's just my first guess.


Dealing with data runs along a spectrum -- from business people and storytellers wanting to know how to weave data into their stories to data geeks wanting to know how to display their numbers in ways that tell a story.


Through conversations and sharing between our fields, we can learn a lot from each other and be better for it. Here's to collaboration and cross-pollination!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Kati Sipp's curator insight, June 8, 2013 8:11 PM

Do you use data to tell stories in your work, as a journalist or organizer? You might want to check this out.

Marie-Sophie's curator insight, June 14, 2013 4:20 AM

#Therearedifferentwaystotellthisstory

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Sell More! Cool Story Process To Use w/ Your Sales Force

Sell More! Cool Story Process To Use w/ Your Sales Force | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Without a helicopter view of the customer’s world, salespeople are selling blind. And when they do stumble upon a customer’s pain point, they can only refer to vague pain points (i.e. ‘time consuming’ or ‘prone to error’), because their knowledge of the customer is superficial.

Karen Dietz's insight:

Sales guy and story professional Michael Harris shares with us one of the big issues we all have with closing more sales -- we don't know the customer well enough. Their pain points and needs are often not well understood.


So how do you fix that? Harris suggests a quick storytelling session with your sales reps to uncover new knowledge about your customer. What a wonderful way to transfer knowledge, fill in gaps about your customer, and keep it all lively + interesting! Even better, Harris shares the process with us.


Go read the article and keep this process handy. I bet you will also think of other applications outside of sales for it!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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CAEXI BEST's curator insight, June 4, 2013 11:32 PM
Vendez plus! Processus Histoire fraîche Pour utiliser w / votre force de vente
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Going Viral--The Science of Sharing Biz Stories

Going Viral--The Science of Sharing Biz Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Jonah Berger, Wharton School professor and author of Contagious: Why Things Catch On.

Karen Dietz's insight:

This is a 14 minute podcast with author Johah Berger who recently wrote Contagious: Why Things Catch On.


You will definitely want to listen to this quick piece because it is chock full of critical information about creating content that is shared. Berger talks about the science behind why people share content and stories. Knowing this information will give you much more understanding and control as you are creating content and hoping it is shared a lot -- or could possibly go viral.


Berger talks about how certain types of both positive and negative emotions facilitate sharing. And that not all negative emotions are bad in this case. And also how to think about controversy, because there are benefits to controversy if handled well. Certain emotions and controversy can move people to action, which is the point to sharing our business stories.


There is lots of other great material Berger shares. May you be able to use his insights well to help you in your business!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


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Mirjana Podvorac's curator insight, June 4, 2013 6:17 AM

From Harvard Business Blog.

Renee Baribeau's curator insight, June 4, 2013 1:56 PM

Going viral is an art and also a guessing game.

Jose Nevarez's comment, June 27, 2013 10:29 AM
Thanks Karen, I just purchased the book because of your insight.
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The Reason Your Biz Story Matters Video

http://www.socialmediabynumbers.com The era of Social Media has changed the nature of organizational definition. We are no longer authors of our identity, bu...
Karen Dietz's insight:

It's Friday, we've all been working hard, and we need a break! So here's a terrific 8:20 minute video for you about biz storytelling.


You may think it is just another quick video on why business storytelling is important -- no news there. And it is.


But, on the other hand...it makes some very excellent point about how sharing your business stories can keep your reputation strong in these days of immediate Twitter posts and social media feedback. Now that is worthwhile news!


Have a great weekend all :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Oakville Deals's curator insight, June 2, 2013 12:49 PM

What's your story? What are your mission vision values? Why it matters.

Excellent video.

Cho Rong Kim's comment, June 3, 2013 3:43 AM
Really nice!
Karen Dietz's comment, June 4, 2013 7:28 PM
Thank you all for your comments! Glad you liked the post :)
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Looking at the Future of Marketing -- & Storytelling

Looking at the Future of Marketing -- & Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Insights from Gerd Leonhard on the marketing trends you should be paying attention to now.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's the link: https://hbr.org/2013/05/a-futurist-looks-at-the-future


Now here's a thought-provoking article for this weekend! Author Dana Rousmaniere chatted with Futurist Gerd Leonhard about the future of marketing. I curated the article because it also has a lot to do with the increasing importance of storytelling.


Here are Leonhard's predictions that connect with storytelling:

1. Marketing will be more personalized and customized.  Breaking trust with customers will be deadly. Stories help create personalized marketing and build trust. They also help you keep that trust.


2. Ongoing conversations will consume marketing activities, which is different that what is happening today. That means lots of story sharing back and forth between customers and between the company and customers.


3. Data alone will never be enough. Companies need to reach consumers on an emotional level. That's the role of stories.


There are a few more predictions to read about and great information to gain that I think is very interesting. Enjoy these insights into the future!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Mike Ellsworth's curator insight, May 28, 2013 6:46 PM
Karen Dietz's insight:

 

Here are Leonhard's predictions that connect with storytelling:

1. Marketing will be more personalized and customized.  Breaking trust with customers will be deadly. Stories help create personalized marketing and build trust. They also help you keep that trust.

 

2. Ongoing conversations will consume marketing activities, which is different that what is happening today. That means lots of story sharing back and forth between customers and between the company and customers.

 

3. Data alone will never be enough. Companies need to reach consumers on an emotional level. That's the role of stories.

 

Mike Ellsworth's insight:

 

If you don't already know that you need to be telling stories online, mosey on over to Karen's curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


Here are Leonhard's points in brief:


1. By 2020, most interruptive marketing will be gone. 

2. The idea of having a separate marketing department is going to vanish. In the future, the "reason to buy" will be socially motivated

3. Location-based services will be immensely valuable and useful, but not until we have some kind of a privacy bank 

4. Companies are going to try to predict how people feel about their brand, and then adjust in real time

5. Companies can collect all the data they want, but data alone will never be enough. You still need to reach consumers on an emotional level. 


Cho Rong Kim's comment, May 30, 2013 12:32 PM
I always get good advices from your scoops. I really appreciate about your effort ^^ Thank you.
Karen Dietz's comment, June 4, 2013 7:24 PM
Thank you so much Cho Rong! Enjoy the day :)
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10 E-Commerce Storytelling Tips for Conversions!

10 E-Commerce Storytelling Tips for Conversions! | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
If storytelling is the new SEO then how do you tell stories on a e-commerce website? Here are 10 E-Commerce Storytelling Tips with examples and how to tips.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Ha ha -- I love these 10 story tips for effective e-commerce! They hold true for any website, but if you've got an e-commerce site, the author Martin (Marty) Smith makes the link between storytelling and conversion to buyers.


The 'Be Quiet' tip makes me smile.  And his examples of 'About' pages are classics.


So do yourself a favor and check out Smith's 10 tips. You can see how well you are doing, plan the tweaks you need to do, or decide on a major upgrade.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business stoytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Mike Ellsworth's curator insight, May 24, 2013 10:54 PM

reScooping Karen Dietz's Scoop of my buddy, Marty Smith's post: 

Karen Dietz's insight:Ha ha -- I love these 10 story tips for effective e-commerce! They hold true for any website, but if you've got an e-commerce site, the author Martin (Marty) Smith makes the link between storytelling and conversion to buyers. The 'Be Quiet' tip makes me smile. And his examples of 'About' pages are classics. So do yourself a favor and check out Smith's 10 tips. You can see how well you are doing, plan the tweaks you need to do, or decide on a major upgrade. This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business stoytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it
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Where Do You Come From? Tips For Creating A Powerful Biz Place Story

Where Do You Come From? Tips For Creating A Powerful Biz Place Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
There's a good reason Apple puts Designed in California on its products rather than Built in China. Lessons for all of us on developing a successful...
Karen Dietz's insight:

This article is all about how to leverage your geographic location for business advantage.


That idea is not new, but I like how this article treats the topic. The author, Mark McNeilly, makes the point that everybody wants to know where your business is located. So why not really use that as a marketing angle?


He gives clear examples of how location can influence your customer's perception about you. He suggest avoiding postcard branding -- that's where you put a picture of the Eiffel Tower on your package but you don't live in Paris.


McNeilly next makes several points, with examples, about connecting your story to your geographic location. Like Chrysler's 'imported from Detroit' campaign and microbreweries that are gaining repution because of how they are leveraging their location.


Now the question remains in my mind -- in what ways can I connect living in San Diego, CA to my story curation, consutling, and coaching busines? Hmmmmm....I may have to go to the beach to ponder that one :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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At Hopleaf Bar, A Tale Behind Every Ale

At Hopleaf Bar, A Tale Behind Every Ale | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Mike Roper's a sucker for a good story. One afternoon, while sampling beers at his Uptown bar Hopleaf, he relayed how archaeologists in Turkey unearthed pottery buried for thousands of years,...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Wow -- what a great use of stories at Hopleaf bar in Chicago! This is one business who's doing storytelling right.


Here in San Diego, CA we have a hot hot hot micro-brew industry winning all kinds of awards. Now they just need to follow Hopleaf's lead and connect their stories to their beers to boost sales even more.


Hmmm...sounds like I need to take a wander down to my local pub Hamilton's (100 different brews available and counting) for a draft and to whisper in their ear :)


For your business, how can you do the same as Hopleaf?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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La Belle Page's curator insight, May 19, 2013 3:55 AM

Pour l'inspiration.... very interesting as ever, thanks Karen  !

 

malek's comment, May 19, 2013 7:39 AM
Mind provocative......stories from a bar! thank you
Karen Dietz's comment, May 20, 2013 9:07 PM
Glad you both found it inspiring, provocative, and fun to read!
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Why it’s time to rethink visual storytelling on the web from the bottom up

Why it’s time to rethink visual storytelling on the web from the bottom up | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here is a very provocative piece! It's web producer and publisher Adam Westbrook proposing a new idea for visual storytelling on the web. Or suggesting we start looking for one. Either way, Westbrook is definitely on the cutting edge.


Even better, this is all presented in story form. With a very different kind of visual presentation than you are used to. So Westbrook is walking his talk here.


Both Westbook's ideas and his presentation are very creative. I know you will enjoy both, and get a taste for where visual storytelling on the Internet is going.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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cyneth's curator insight, May 16, 2013 4:23 PM

Adam Westbrook is proposing a new idea for visual storytelling on the web.

As technology becomes more pervasive and immersive, artists are sensing limitless possibilities on the horizon. Adam invites developers, designers, artists and storytellers to engage in a conversation around new ideas.

Jonathan Rattray Clark's curator insight, May 16, 2013 4:47 PM

bottoms up

mirmilla's curator insight, May 17, 2013 11:12 AM

Visual Storytelling as a web-native form. An inspiring thought.

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How Siemens successfully uses storytelling

How Siemens successfully uses storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Keith Ritchie, storyteller at Siemens, talks to Marketing about his role as a storyteller and just how powerful telling a story can be to engage clients, potential clients, and staff. What does story-telling mean to you?
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is a terrific article about how Siemens incorporates storytelling as a core competence in both its marketing and internal corporate culture.


It's a fascinating piece where Keith Ritchie from Siemens talks about why they use stories, how they use them, and how they think about them. There's even a discussion about ROI which is a nice twist on how to think of the ROI of stories.


I have no idea who actually wrote the article, based on an interview with Ritchie, or I would thank them for putting together such a thorough piece.


If you are curious about how larger organizations are using stories -- and how you might be able to do the same regardless of your size -- then check out this post.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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gillkelley's curator insight, May 13, 2013 4:31 AM

Great explanation of 'storytelling' as a strategy or concept, as told to the Australian version of "Marketing'.

Emma's curator insight, May 15, 2013 7:56 AM

Esto si es branding

Peter Fruhmann's curator insight, August 8, 2013 6:57 AM

One of the key sentences in this article for me is "I think that good communicators, the great communicators, all really do it (storytelling) naturally." Keith Richie points out that it works for leaders as well as brands and/or organisations. But will all communication professionals who offer 'storytelling' recognize that? I've seen some ugly twists to good stories or good stories thrown away for the sake of a 'new story'...

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Make A Meaningful Brand Story

Make A Meaningful Brand Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
How to get the audience to care.
Karen Dietz's insight:

There are things I really like about this article, and some that I don't.


I love that the focus of the article is on share stories your customers care about and that connect to universal truths (i.e. transformation), altruistic desires (i.e doing good), or fundamental longings (i.e. connection).


I like the examples of how brands are engaging customers using different methods and through gamification. I like the advice to take actions that your customers can share stories about. And I like that they focus on engagement being an experience of co-created play.


These are all dynamics inherent in storytelling. Yet this is what I don't like: the article is less about storytelling and more about creating a presence. You can argue that storytelling creates a presence and I agree. But the author focuses mostly on ads and customer engagement that is only a slice of business storytelling. And the article just goes to show that despite some of the solid notions here, the author is jumping on the storytelling bandwagon using words 'story' and 'storytelling' but without any accuracy or understanding what those words really mean.


OK -- I'll get off my soap box :)


Do read the article and watch the videos -- good points are made!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Story Mind, Data Mind - Making Data Come Alive

Story Mind, Data Mind - Making Data Come Alive | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Narrative Transport and Evaluative Mindset are Distinct Modes
Have you ever been “lost in a story?” It could be an exciting movie, an engrossing book, or a deep conversation with a ...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Colleague Andrew Nemiccolo just wrote this terrific article on narrative transport, storytelling and how to really convey data to make it stick.


I really like how he talks about narrative transport and how sharing data or information can't get youthere. Then he gives great tips for how to work with the data/information and 'storify' it -- either by finding stories to share about it or using storytelling elements to grab attention, keep people interested, and generate meaning.


If you ever have to deal with data in your business -- and who doesn't -- then grab this article and use these tips!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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How To Fight Story & Pitch Fatigue

How To Fight Story & Pitch Fatigue | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Between wooing potential investors and meeting people at parties you're going to have to tell your company's story thousands of times. Worry notthere...
Karen Dietz's insight:

"I've been to 4 networking sessions this week and told my business story endlessly. It's boring! I'm bored! People's eyes glaze over!"


Yep -- it is a common problem. When sharing the same biz story over and over again fatigue can happen, just like it does for entrepreneurs making the rounds of angel investors and venture capitalists looking for funds. Or for nonprofits doing endless rounds of fundraising.


So what's a person to do? Learn improv skills, different story imagery techniques, and different story structures to change up your story and keep it fresh.


Because frankly, if you're tired of your story, it will bleed through other people won't be able to connect with it or get excited about what you are doing. That doesn't mean you abandon the story. It does mean you decide to play, have fun with, and get creative with your story so you have multiple ways to share it that keeps it novel for you.


Author Drake Baer says much the same but comes at it from the place of brain chemicals and Jazz. Go read the article -- it's short but makes terrific points about what creates pitch fatique and offers a few other tips for what to do about it.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Jasbin's comment, June 10, 2013 7:48 AM
Nice and interesting story
Rajeshwar Parekh's curator insight, June 10, 2013 9:00 AM

...certainly applies to writing fiction because of legitimate or credible characterization, for a villain that causes a change in a protagonist's early life and later in her life, creating another legitimate villain...

Karen Dietz's comment, June 24, 2013 2:59 PM
Glad you liked the article Express Invites and Rajeshwar, you make good points about its relevance for fiction writers.
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5 Powerful Elements for Incredible Business Stories

5 Powerful Elements for Incredible Business Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Stories can create change, both in ourselves and in our organizations. In this guest post, Matt Ragland shares five elements of powerful stories.
Karen Dietz's insight:

I love this post! Here author Matt Ragland shares great story wisdom with us.


Instead of the typical list of 'elements of powerful stories' -- you know, like emotions, characters, settings, visual language,  and all that good important stuff -- Ragland digs deeper.


Yes, his 5 elements are why we really tell stories -- and why these elements make for very powerful storytelling. Because these are experiences we also crave.


Here's a teaser from the article -- "stories show the light and the dark." Agreed! Storytelling in business is not all sweetness and light. It's gritty. It's messy. It's awesome.


Check out Ragland's other elements and let's continue to rise to these kinds of storytelling heights.


Oh, and PS -- he shares a terrific story, too!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Constance Jones Collier's comment, June 6, 2013 12:39 PM
Thanks for sharing everyone loves a good story :)
Karen Dietz's comment, June 6, 2013 4:35 PM
I appreciate all of your comments!
Birgitta Edberg's comment, June 8, 2013 6:28 PM
Thanks!
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Cool Tech, Good Characters & the Evolution of Storytelling--James Cameron

Cool Tech, Good Characters & the Evolution of Storytelling--James Cameron | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
He might be Hollywood’s highest-grossing director, but when it comes to his choice in movies James Cameron is an everyman.“My tastes have always been pretty blue collar. I never went to film-study classes.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Veteran film maker, innovator, and movie storyteller par excellence weighs into the discussion about the evolution of storytelling. To hear some people talk you'd think this 100,000 year old art form is undergoing eath shattering change.


Well, is that so? According to Cameron -- NOT! Glad to know we think alike :)


Here is the very valid point Cameron does make: it is not the structure of a story that's changing, it's the media through which stories get told. And the technology to help us tell and share stories is also changing. Both of these are very good things. 


As he says in the article: “I think the future of storytelling is: You think of some good characters and you have them do some cool stuff that you can relate to and go through hell and come out the other side of it changed in some positive or negative way, and then it ends,” he says, with a chuckle. He acknowledges that methods of conveying stories may evolve, such as multiple plot lines or interactivity, but, for him, the movie will remain at the core."


Cameron makes a few other nice points about connecting to the audience. This is a very nice and enjoyble read. Many thanks to the author Anne Cassidy for writing such a great post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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7 Things Biz Storytellers Can Learn From Fiction Writers

7 Things Biz Storytellers Can Learn From Fiction Writers | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Content marketing is storytelling, so it's not all that bizarre to think that fiction writers might actually have some advice for us.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is what I like about this post, written by marketer Pratik Dholakiya -- his points about suspense, showing not telling, rethinking characters, write what you love, and continuing to hone your craft.


At first glance you might go, "Yeah, yeah". I did too until I started reading and enjoyed some of the twists he took on these conventional topics.


Like suspense. I love that he says all stories -- and yes business stories -- are all about mysteries and unresolved problems. Don't be too quick in providing answers! Build the mystery and suspense in your stories. In other words, don't turn your stories into an FAQ! Lead people on a suspenseful journey. Check out what he says about avoiding common blog posts structures.


Show, don't tell. Well, that's obvious. But sometimes harder to do. The rule of thumb? Don't give examples or descriptions -- share stories with images.


Who is your character? Think of your organization as a character. It doesn't have to be limited to a single person. Think of a thing, organization, or event as a character. And a character always wants something, encountering obstacles to fulfilling those wants. Therein lies your story.


Write what you love. Stop writing about topics you think you should be writing about. Audiences can always tell when you are not emotionally engaged in the story. If at some level you don't love what you are writing about, it bleeds through. Audiences can tell and don't engage either. So fair warning!


OK -- there are other great points Dholakiya makes here, so go read the article!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Andrea Norwood's comment, June 24, 2013 3:56 PM
I totally agree and my character wants something and that's control over humans and the earth and of course their underground world too. I say, as I learned from a great author and mentor Stephen King. Make sure every story has a beginning, middle and end, because that helps to make a story without them, then there is no story. Only rambling.
Fran Bambust's curator insight, July 23, 2013 4:34 PM

Verhalen vertellen en toch met zakelijke dingen bezig zijn... Nee, het spreekt elkaar niet tegen. Integendeel...

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When Leaders Should NOT Tell Stories: Jo Tyler at TEDxPSU

Jo Tyler, Associate Professor of Training and Development at Penn State, is an educator, storyteller, organizational consultant, and mosaic artist. When she ...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is colleague Jo Tyler giving her TED talk and I love it! Very little is available that addresses when NOT to tell biz stories -- especially leaders. Tyler gives some terrific guidelines on this topic.


But that's not all that's here in this video! There are other gems about:

  1. Listening for the story
  2. Offering your biz stories as food for thought instead of them being all about you
  3. Story is not a tool (great explanation!)
  4. Story success is depending on your authentic relationship to the story
  5. She gives a fabulous example of an executive who really screwed up storytelling and the consequences it had on the organization


All of these points are critically important for content creators and business story folks to understand and incorporate.


Enjoy the video!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, May 30, 2013 9:50 AM

I scooped this from Karen Dietz. She is a great story telling educator.

Margaret Driscoll, Learning Organization Librarian's curator insight, June 1, 2013 10:51 AM

Listening is a skill worth developing.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 6, 2013 4:36 PM
Thank you so much for your kind comment Alison! And Margaret, glad you also found value in the article.
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Rolex & Their Storytelling "Icons" Campaign - Fab Story Triggers Example

Rolex & Their Storytelling "Icons" Campaign - Fab Story Triggers Example | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

Colleague Omar Kattan wrote this post about Rolex and their new 'Icons' campaign that has been a huge hit.


It's a brilliant use of story triggers on Rolex's part. What is a story trigger? In this case, Rolex is using images of movers and shakers who have worn their watches. These images spark stories within the minds of the viewers. No stories are explicitely told, they are simply trigger the associations and stories we already have embedded within us.


Kattan brings two Rolex videos into his article as examples. The first one about Elvis Presley is more of a back story -- and I'm left wanting more of the story!


The second video is much more of a story trigger. It's not really a story, but a video that sparks memories and stories within me about Andy Warhol.


I agree with Kattan in the article when he says Rolex needs to develop the story further, by adding more back stories. People will love them. And as Kattan also says, imagine what could happen for Rolex if they solicited stories from their customers about themselves or members of their family wearing Rolex watches!


Like Kattan, I congratulate Rolex on doing such a good job here and showing all of us what's possible using story triggers.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Os Ishmael's curator insight, May 26, 2013 11:07 AM

Nice find. A great example of the power of storytelling and how it can posture up a brand.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 6, 2013 4:37 PM
Thanks Os! Yes, it is a terrific example. Glad you like it too.
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Hone "Strategic Patience" & Watch Your Story Creativity Spike

Hone "Strategic Patience" & Watch Your Story Creativity Spike | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
An art history professor makes her students sit in front of a painting for three hours. PampG invents the Swiffer. Those events are more alike than...
Karen Dietz's insight:

When I work with clients and their biz stories, and their organizational culture, I often talk about the need to develop patience. I also discuss with them the principle of deceleration resulting in acceleration.


This article, written by Drake Baer, explains both the need for patience and the principle of deceleration in order to accelerate. I know, it sounds so counter-intuitive! But it works.


What does this have to do with storytelling? Because way too often we rush to craft our stories without giving ourselves time to patiently sit with them, think about them, recraft them, learn more about ourselves from them, etc. 


Spending the time to reflect on your story will get you to a more powerful piece more quickly. And your story creativity will definitely kick in by bringing more patience into the process.


This notion is rarely talked about in articles, but acknowledged as part of the story process among some top performance tellers.


So take a breath, relax, reflect, and give your creativity a chance to emerge.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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John Michel's curator insight, May 22, 2013 4:51 PM

Deep patience. Close attention. These are not virtues often associated with college students (or some tech workers, for that matter). But as Harvard art history professor Jennifer L. Roberts recently explained, the skills for finding the "details, relationships, and orders that take time to see" can be introduced.

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Share a Story, Help Create a New Perspective

Share a Story, Help Create a New Perspective | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Before I share his story—or more specifically, have him share his story—let’s talk briefly about why you want to use stories to help shift someone out of a stuck place.

Karen Dietz's insight:

Colleage David Lee shared this post with me and I think it's great because it reminds us again about how the stories we share in business can help create shifts and changes in people.


Lee shares a situation he had with a client, and how he used a story to help that person shift to a different place and resolve a long-standing issue.


While the post is about a coaching interaction and the power of story, I bet a good number of the busines stories you share have the same ability. Lee makes good points in the article that how stories can create both personal and organizational change.


Lee's post is perfect timing. I've just been re-reading the book "Influencer: The Power to Change Anything" by Kerry Patterson, et al (2008). It's all about storytelling and great stuff.


If you want to read more about how stories can influence people to shift, then read Lee's post. For a deeper dive, dig into "Influencer" (I have no relationship with the authors or their publisher, I just think it's a fab book!).


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Embed Your Biz Stories Anywhere With Cowbird's New Function

Embed Your Biz Stories Anywhere With Cowbird's New Function | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Cowbird has been used by the National Geographic and other outlets as a storytelling tool
Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here's a treat! The digital storytelling tool Cowbird has released new functionality.


You are now able to embed a story you create using their tool anywhere on the web -- complete with audio, sharing, handwriting, and more.


Here's the direct link to Cowbird: http://cowbird.com 


Way cool! Have fun making your biz stories with Cowbird, embedding them and sharing them all around.


Written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on busines storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Karen Dietz's comment, May 24, 2013 5:15 PM
HI Barbara and thanks for your input! When Cowbird originally came out, I too thought it would not work for business folks so have ignored it. I thought the focus on personal stories not related to business wouldn't work. I really didn't think Cowbird would be attractive to businesses because of the type of stories people were sharing plus the stories stayed on Cowbird's site. But because they've added new functionality where you can now embed your stories on your website, blog, etc. I think businesses could use it today. The best business stories are personal. I've poked around Cowbird and it seems a simple enough tool to use so I think biz folks could definitely leverage it now to their advantage. I am sure businesses will come up with creative ideas for how using this tool if they want.
Jeff Domansky's comment, May 24, 2013 6:32 PM
Hi all, I agree Cowbird is not for most businesses yet. But imagine if your business wanted to connect with customers and encourage them to share their personal stories in a contest, to illustrate a concept or support a charity? I'm with Karen. It's not the tools, it's the creativity that counts.
Karen Dietz's comment, May 24, 2013 7:08 PM
Yeah, great idea Jeff! Sort of like Pinterest.
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Story Trumps Description Every Time -- Wow! What A Difference!

Story Trumps Description Every Time -- Wow! What A Difference! | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Show rather than tell to motivate supporters to care, then act.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Hey, this is a quick article with a very powerful point -- a before and after make-over of a marketing piece. The 'before' promo was not a story. The 'after' promo is a story. And wow - can you experience the difference!


If you need a good example of what not to do, and then what to do, this is it. 


At the end of thea article are even more resources for you for telling your biz stories. They are all written for non-profits, but you will benefit just the same.


Enjoy!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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