Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Growing leader's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com
Curated by Karen Dietz
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Attract More Readers By Writing Posts They Already Crave

Attract More Readers By Writing Posts They Already Crave | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Marcus Sheridan of River Pools and Spas was featured in the New York Times. Why?

 

He went from spending over $250,000 a month on advertising and over drawing from the bank to making $1.7 million in sales from the first post alone. 

 

Here's how you write posts your readers crave.

Karen Dietz's insight:

Have you ever wondered how to really figure out what your customers desire? Of course, asking customers directly for their stories is a fabulous place to start.


But that's not the only way! Here author Mark Trueman (I had to hunt for this -- the name is not on the blog post) gives us plenty of great ways to find customer pain points and the answers they are searching for. I've used some of these myself with great success. Tips #4 & #8 are where you want to collect your customer stories.


Have a terrific time using these methods because you will gain lots of knowledge you an use.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Karen Dietz's comment, September 4, 2013 3:10 PM
Hi Hans! Yes, I have used these techniques and they have helped me a lot. Just goes to show that storytelling is not the answer to every problem -- sometimes we need other tools to help us also. Using the tips in the article has allowed me to evoke more pointed stories from those I interview, leading to understanding my customers even better. Yeah!
Hein Holthuizen's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:26 PM

will it work for you?

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An App To Help The Government Stop Street Harassment via Storytelling

An App To Help The Government Stop Street Harassment via Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The Hollaback app has long helped women document the abuse they get on city streets. Now it goes a step farther automatically creating a government...
Karen Dietz's insight:

I find this app and article (authored by Sydney Brownstone) fascinating for a couple of reasons. First, the founders of the app talk openly about street harassment storytelling as a vehicle to stop unwanted/undesirable social behavior.


As the article explains, if you are harassed on the streets of New York City you can use the app to immediately report the incident to city council members and related agencies. And part of the report you file with the app is "your story" about what happened. Wow! The whole piece is ingenious.


Read the article to understand all the implications here.


But here's another way this app and article fascinates me -- it's about a company (ihollaback.org) embedding storytelling directly into their product/service. It is not an add-on or afterthought. Given the nature of what the app is targeting, it would be silly to quibble if stories are actually being shared through this app, or if it is more information. I like that they are actively using the words story and storytelling as a way to capture people's experience. So bravo.


The question for reader is: how can you bring story and storytelling more direclty into the products/services you offer? Maybe this article will spark some ideas.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Tony Gough's curator insight, September 3, 2013 6:50 AM

An app that may help women on holiday or working in cities.

Karen Dietz's comment, September 4, 2013 3:12 PM
Thank you Malek, Kati and Tony for your comments. I really hope this app travels to other cities. I think it could really make a difference. And the storytelling aspect of the app really will help city officials understand the context of the harassment -- which is something numbers can never do.
malek's comment, September 11, 2014 11:50 AM
an interesting topic..keep on going
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37 Tips for Writing Emails that Get Opened, Read, and Clicked--Story Elements

37 Tips for Writing Emails that Get Opened, Read, and Clicked--Story Elements | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
We've all been there ... You've carefully crafted an email. You've polished each sentence. You've racked your brain for the very best subject line. Yo
Karen Dietz's insight:

You wouldn't necessarily think that writing effective emails has anything to do with business storytelling -- but it does!


Here is a fabulous list of 37 tips to build power emails that get results. While the article or tips do not mention the word story, a bunch of them are about story. Like #2: Be Useful. Only email when you have something valuable or helpful to say. Well, your stories are packed with useful, valuable, and helpful insights. Sharing stories can always provide value for readers.


And tips on creating subject lines -- these can be the cool title of your story. Well crafted it can pique curiosity (#12) and promise something good (#9).


For writing emails, develop a natural voice (#25) which is all about authenticity. When you share your stories this automatically happens. And #27: Stop being dull. Use lots of LOTS (language of the senses) in your writing and stories. Tap into sensory material of sight, sound, touch, taste, smell and feel to create images and experiences for people reading your storied emails.


There are a number of other tips here that connect to storytelling and tons of tips to help you write emails that get read and that people will take action on.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Karen Dietz's comment, September 4, 2013 3:13 PM
An essential insight Gordon! Thanks for reminding us all about the importance of analytics.
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The dangers of "willful blindness"--Story, Change, & Empowerment

Gayla Benefield was just doing her job -- until she uncovered an awful secret about her hometown that meant its mortality rate was 80 times higher than anywh...
Karen Dietz's insight:

It is Monday afternoon and after a weekend of R & R it's time for a kick in the pants. It's a triple dose of motivating and encouraging stories/presentations that give us hope about simple things we can do to make a difference in our daily lives, and in the world.


I so appreciate my readers here, and you have told me time and again how much you value quality material that helps you think better, and not junk. So here we go:


Dose #1: Here Margaret Heffeman shares the story of one woman and how she changed the fate of people in Libby, Montana forever. It is a wonderfully inspiring story but that is not the key message behind it. Heffeman's point in sharing the story is about the 'willfull blindness' we find ourselves in these days and what to do about it.


Now why in heavens name would I curate this piece?? Because we in business suffer from 'willfull blindness' all the time. We just don't want to know about some of the stories in our companies or organizations (small or large) -- mostly likely because we don't know what to do about what we hear, or because they are too painful. These are the 'undiscussables' in organizations -- or the elephants in the room. Then along comes Heffeman to burst the bubble that keeps us stuck and helps us take the next steps. Hooray!


Dose # 2: After watching Heffeman's TEDx talk, then click on the link below to take in Marty Kaplan Has “Outrage Envy” And Wants Americans To Take To The Streets
http://urbantimes.co/2013/08/marty-kaplan-has-outrage-envy-and-wants-americans-to-take-to-the-streets/
Kaplan, a Media Scholar, sits down with Bill Moyers in this 25 minute piece to remind us that a lot of the stories we hear today are told to keep us compliant and feeling powerless. Shock and awe, I know. It is well worth every minute of your time to listen to this entertaining interview. Need to learn about 'over-storying? This is it and a perfect mirror for Heffeman's talk, bringing some of the same points she makes about a local story out onto the national stage, plus talking about the role of business, and what to do next. Time to wake up!


Dose #3: Here is a 4 minute video http://www.upworthy.com/one-easy-thing-all-white-people-could-do-that-would-make-the-world-a-better-place-5  from www.Upworthy.com that is the story of a Safeway clerk who screwed up big time, and how two women handled it perfectly. It is further proof that one person can have a huge impact. Titled "One Easy Thing All White People Could Do That Would Make The World A Better Place", we learn how any of the priviledges we enjoy can be used and what to do to make lives better simply though the power of questions and words. Awesome! Many thanks to my story buddy and long time friend Patti Christiansen for sharing this video on Facebook.


All of the insights gained from these 3 videos are applicable to your business or organization. And they are applicable to you in your personal life too. When we get discouraged, powerless, or hopeless these videos show us the way. Here are ways you can use the wisdom from these pieces:

  1. To rethink your personal relationship to national issues
  2. To rethink experiences in your business or organization
  3. To take some of the action steps suggested -- field test and refine them
  4. To share the videos in workshops, trainings, classes, with friends and family during get-togethers, and start talking about the wisdom and opinions shared
  5. You may think of other ways to use these pieces


In the end, it's all about trying on a different set of glasses, and felling enlivened, enobled, and hopeful. There is always a way....Looking forward to your feedback.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 29, 2013 9:47 PM
Miklos, you have made fabulous points. Many thanks for sharing them. Our voices may be small, but if we keep sharing, more people will see these. If one person gains benefit from these videos, then the world is a better place already.
ozziegontang's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:59 PM

No need for me to add anything.  Just view Karen Dietz's curated insights and links to reflect on one's own power.  With Values, if I know what you stand for; I will also know what you won't stand for.


I have been blessed with wonderful peers, mentors and teachers during my 27 years as a Vistage Chair. They  have similar shared Values of: Trust, Caring, Challenge, and Growth. And with these people it has always been based on Dan Ariely's Social Norm the foundation being Trust and Relationship.  See the Youtube: Dan Ariely: The Cost of Social Norms.

Karen Dietz's comment, September 4, 2013 3:15 PM
Thank you Ozzie! You've shared some great additional insights.
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No Story Will Save You: Avoiding 4 Major Boo-boos in Sales/Marketing

No Story Will Save You: Avoiding 4 Major Boo-boos in Sales/Marketing | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

 When you make certain actions in sales and marketing, there is no gray area – only right and wrong.

 

 

Karen Dietz's insight:

In all of the hype around business storytelling -- tell a story and all of your problems will be solved -- it is important to know that even if you share the most amazing story, if you make these 4 mistakes you are still toast.


This article by we don't know who (now that's irritating!) frames the 4 mistakes businesses make for B2B companies. But they apply to all of us.


I'm going to add a 5th boo-boo: not signing your blob post. If you want to build trust and authenticity, put your %!#& name on your blog post. Don't make people hunt for it. Don't post a blog post anonymously, or post an article that gives the impression it was generated by some no-name group in a back office somewhere. Why folks think an article has to reflect the combined voice of a company (hence, no name attached to an article) is beyond me. In this day and age, we want to know there is a real live person behind the article, TYVM.


OK -- I'm over my cranky moment. Enjoy the article and your day!


PS -- and many thanks to fellow curator Maegan Andie @Maegan_Andie and http://www.scoop.it/u/maegan-anderson?sc_source=mail&_tmc=ZRJGfI8CSF99UGR7TR0fueRy6opT0FEIkpC1C1EQYow for finding and suggesting this article!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Maegan Anderson's comment, August 23, 2013 3:33 AM
Hi, Karen. Thanks for reading! I couldn't agree more on that, content is created by the thoughts and sentiments of the author, it is not a generated "body of text"; otherwise, it will lose its authentic value.
Karen Dietz's comment, August 23, 2013 1:37 PM
Hi Maegan! Yep, it happens too often and I'm noticing that either the post does not have an author's name attached to it, or I have to go hunting around the site for the author's name, which is a total pain. I wish more authors realized that their name needs to be right on the blog post. I appreciate you chiming in!
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Taming The Last 10%: Finishing Meaningful Work & the Role of Stories

Taming The Last 10%: Finishing Meaningful Work & the Role of Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Struggling to complete that big work project painting or manuscript These inspiring tips from creative masters Shakespeare and less likely sources...
Karen Dietz's insight:

I just finished writing the last chapter of "Business Storytellng for Dummies" that will hit the bookstores this December. The chapter was half done and I hit a wall -- the kind runners experience when you question if you have anything left to give and wonder how you are ever going to make it to the finish line.


So when I came across this article today, I naturally gravitated toward it. And I thought as you work in your business or organization, the words of wisdom in this article by Faisal Hoque might help you too.


And stories play a role! Particularly fairy tales. So this post is definitely more about how stories can assist you personally rather than how using stories can help you lead or grow your business.


Hoque reminds us that fairy tales contain all kinds of problem solving structures and techniques. These structures and techniques are available for us as we face life challenges and resolve life's issues.


It is an easy and inspiring read. Feel like you haven't been exposed enough to fairy tales to take advantage of their insights? Then go here to listen to all the Grimm Fairy Tales in audio format: http://www.worldoftales.com/fairy_tales/Grimm's_fairy_tales_audio.html


Now here's the trick -- as you are listening to the fairy tales, just sit back and enjoy them. Don't try to figure out what problem solving structures are embedded therein. Just keep listening to them and let those insights from the stories percolate upward.


Enjoy this different kind of article than what I usually curate -- I hope you find it both informative and inspiring.


Review written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Annette Simmons's comment, August 21, 2013 12:53 PM
Perfect. I use historical stories and autobiographies the same way. I like fairy tales that haven't had the wisdom altered out of them as well. Thanks for the links!
Karen Dietz's comment, August 21, 2013 8:37 PM
Great points Kristen! And I agree with you too Annette. "Sanitized" fairy tales really don't do us much good.
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Cinderella 2.0: Is this really storytelling?

This short film, created by our Madrid office, is a tutorial for storytelling, brand content and transmedia.


Via Soraia Ferreira, Ph.D.
Karen Dietz's insight:

LOL -- it took me half way through this video while reading other curator's comments for me to realize that the topic of transmedia storytelling for branding was being presented as the Cinerella story! Did you catch it? I'll plead a compromised brain after another marathon writing session for my book :))


Anyway, this video is creative and does a good job explaining transmedia storytelling (although I still have a hard time calling this storytelling in the classical sense). Here are a few additional things to think about though to keep this topic in perspective:

  1. Most of what the video demonstrates are interactions people are having in various media about a precipitating event. We might be able to call them anecdotes, but we can't be sure. Remember, a Tweet is not a story unless it is creatively structured as such.
  2. When all these interactions are tied together with a nice bow, they constitute a narrative reflecting the brand (we hope). Yet one thing to think about is that a person interacting with a piece of the 'story' may never be part of an interaction on another piece of the 'story' happening elsewhere. So who is it that really experiences the meta-story or brand narrative? Hmmmm.
  3. The issue of control also comes into play. Who sparks these interactions -- customers or the company? And what does this really say about what is transpiring?
  4. Oh, and BTW -- storytelling has always been 'liquid' which is why it has lasted 100,000+ years :)


OK -- I'm being a stick-in-the-mud and at this point, and I just keep coming back to the word 'interactions', not storytelling. Obviously I'm not as hip as folks in the transmedia world. I hope someone can explain to me how all of this is really storytelling instead of simply being new ways to interact with folks on a large scale. Today, trying to parse out definitions of storytelling is making my head hurt, so I'm going to go back to writing my last chapter :) 


But I'm trainable on this topic and I look forward to your comments!

And many thanks to fellow curator Soraia Ferreira for finding and sharing this video.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


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Omar Kattan's curator insight, August 17, 2013 6:48 AM

A story to explain transmedia storytelling. Brilliant! Cinderella 2.0 @Soraiaferreira via @KDietz

Bad Spoon's curator insight, August 18, 2013 1:36 AM

Une modernisation du conte de fée Cendrillon,

 

ou comment l'art de la transmission orale peut s'adapter aux médias modernes, offrant aux marques de belles opportunités de visibilité

Rudolf Kabutz's curator insight, August 22, 2013 2:42 AM

Storytelling over the centuries has always been exciting - today the media technology brings totally new dimensions to storytelling.

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Releasing Insight in your organisation through the power of story

Releasing Insight in your organisation through the power of story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
In September 2011, Gary Klein, Patrick Lambe and I ran a workshop in Singapore exploring how insight and story work together to release insight in an organisation.
Karen Dietz's insight:

These visuals are worth hanging out with for awhile so we can get how storytelling can generate new insights for organizations.


This is posted by story colleague Shawn Callahan in Australia, and it is a gem.


It's not often I find articles about storytelling and innovation, although this is a great use for stories in any business. If you walk through the visuals Shawn has provided us, we can see the thought progression, and learn how shifting the stories we tell can bring us new insights to discover. These insights in turn can lead to innovations either internally, or with new products and services.


Enjoy!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Want To Get Ahead? Stop Talking And Listen for Better Stories.

Want To Get Ahead? Stop Talking And Listen for Better Stories. | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Yes you have tons of exciting things to say. But you can't learn something new without listening.
Karen Dietz's insight:

I love this piece because it's not about saying "just shut up," it focuses instead on what happens when you do stop talking! Now that's refreshing.


Story listening is a skill to develop, just as much as story telling is. Learning how to evoke stories from others is critical as an influence strategy that cascades into all types of business applications -- from leadership to sales to marketing, training, hiring, and product innovation.


This article by Drake Baer reminds us the gifts from others that silence brings. And he includes very practical advice for being silent. Yeah!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Hans Heesterbeek's curator insight, August 9, 2013 3:42 AM

I agree with Karin I think we're almost forgotten how to really listen. Quote: f you're listening--like, for real listening, not waiting to talk--then you'll experience this other person who also experiences reality. Unquote. It just to be normal. 

Annette Simmons's comment, August 9, 2013 9:59 AM
Oh my yes!
Karen Dietz's comment, August 9, 2013 12:49 PM
Great point Hans. I think both Annette and I are behind you 100%!
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5 Tips for Creating Content That's Educational—and Unforgettable

5 Tips for Creating Content That's Educational—and Unforgettable | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
As a content marketer, it would be a good thing if your audience thought of you as a favorite teacher, right? So take a lesson from a couple of students in the know about what makes an ace educator...
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a great post to help our business storytelling!


In this context, it is all about sharing stories via the content you are creating for websites, blog posts, articles, e-books, etc.


I really like several of the more creative ideas. Think of these 5 tips as ways to frame or present your stories. Like"letting people get their hands dirty", or "encourage field trips". What??!! you say.


Yep -- read the article for these great tips. You'll be glad you did. And I bet you create some unforgettable content!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Audrey's curator insight, August 8, 2013 12:28 PM

How about the flipped classroom.  Give the students general questions they can prepare in relation to the specific topic with instructions on where to find the information e.g.  Youtube, certain websites, the teacher's own flickr presentations.  The classroom then becomes a discussion forum where students can show their knowledge and understanding. 

 

Karen Dietz's comment, August 8, 2013 2:48 PM
Love that idea Audrey!
Guillermo Pérez's curator insight, August 8, 2013 9:56 PM

El contenido como referente y como pretexto para convivir, disfrutar y aprender.

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The Rise Of Storydoing: Inside The Staggering Success Of Toms Shoes

The Rise Of Storydoing: Inside The Staggering Success Of Toms Shoes | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Stories live in the hearts of humans and should be at the core of every business. Here's how to take a page out of Toms founder Blake Mycoskie's...
Karen Dietz's insight:

"Storydoing" is the latest buzz word in business storytelling and this article by Ty Montague talks about TOMS shoes as a great example of a "storydoing" company.


"Storydoing" is embodying your business stories, where your business stories are part of the DNA of your company. In other words, storytelling is a core competence, and experienced as 'walking your talk'.


Montague is a veteran of the marketing and advertising worlds. And truly, storytelling has been turning that profession on its head. Organizational development folks have for years been working in the trenches bringing storytelling and business actions -- including those of marketing and advertising -- together so people inside and outside the company experience an integrated whole. But it is hard hard hard and the number of companies who have done this are still few and far between. But progress is being made, slow but sure.


The take aways from this article?

  1. If you are building a brand new company, it's a lot easier to be a "storydoing" company because you can integrate stories into the very fabric of the company from original idea to founding. What is not clear is if "storydoing" can last throughout the business's life cycle, or how "storydoing" morphs and changes as companies mature.
  2. If you are an established company, if marketing/branding professionals are coming to you saying "We've got to walk our talk more", listen to them. Then start doing the heavy lifting to match your culture and marketing/branding together. Or suffer the consequences!


Montague's recent study about "storydoing" companies includes companies that are still paying lip service to embedding storytelling as a core competence into their culture as a strategic imperative. So there's a ton of work to do.


That's the good news, too! I see plenty of work to keep us story professionals busy :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 8, 2013 2:49 PM
Thanks Judy! Have a great week :)
Daren Hartle's curator insight, August 22, 2013 10:42 PM

Fits jeans and short pants

Amanda Wall's curator insight, October 8, 2014 9:52 PM

This article is the Toms story. It follows Toms shoes from day one, through their campaigns, and what has made them into the successful company they are today.

 

I think that the information provided in the article is important in the aspect of brand image and credibility. Customers like to know where their products came from, how they started and where they are headed. Storytelling is important to the Public Relations and Advertising industry as it allows customers to connect, communicate with their beloved brands and feel as though they are apart of something bigger than themselves. 

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The Big Marketing Activity Coloring Book--Fun For All

The Big Marketing Activity Coloring Book--Fun For All | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Download this awesomely entertaining marketing activity book and have fun doing our Email Marketing Word Find, Dress up a Marketer, Revenue Cycle Maze, Thought Leader Book Match Up, Content Marketing Crossword, and so much more!
Karen Dietz's insight:

Hey -- it's Friday and we need some fun! So here's a fabulous free downloadable ebook to keep you busy enjoying your weekend by making marketing a hoot.


Get your scissors and colored pencils out! Written by Jason Miller this will keep you entertained for hours. And help you with your marketing too.


And case in point -- storytelling is part of this too. First, it's an innovative way for Miller to help share his story. And it will help you tell your business story. And it's a terrific example of using comics and other playful activities to both teach, entertain, and add value.


So there are lessons for us all here on multple levels! Now where are my crayons????


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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JettRay's comment, August 4, 2013 11:38 AM
I shared it, as well. There is always great content to share from Karen Dietz! Thanks Karen!!
Tony Gough's curator insight, August 5, 2013 6:16 AM

A little bit of marketing fun!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:44 PM

Let's have some social media fun.

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Biz stories don't need conflict and resolution, or a hero for that matter

Biz stories don't need conflict and resolution, or a hero for that matter | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

Colleague Shawn Callahan just wrote this short post likely agree with more. There are several kinds of stories that we share in business where conflict and resolution is not part of the equation. And thank you Shawn very much for giving us an antidote for all the hype around the hero in business storytelling.


That doesn't mean a hero is unimportant, or that conflict and resolution don't have their place. Even as Lori and I write Business Storytelling For Dummies, we advocate for conflict and resolution to create a compelling story -- because you got a start somewhere. And if you can master conflict and resolution pieces on your way to creating a stand-out story, the rest is easier.


Shawn offers great examples here of stories where conflict and resolution is less important, and a hero doesn't figure in. It's a quick read and brings balance into the business storytelling conversation. Yeah! Thanks again Shawn for your terrific insights.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 2, 2013 7:40 PM
Yes, Hans and Eva, I experience that freedom too. That is really great to point out, so thanks!
Karen Dietz's comment, August 2, 2013 7:42 PM
You are welcome Stephanie! Hope you have a relaxing weekend. You know what I'll be doing (finishing up those last 2 chapters)!
Monika Górska's curator insight, August 4, 2013 5:55 PM

to rethink over

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Beyond Hearing: Importance of Ongoing Dialogue [Storytelling] w/ Customers

Beyond Hearing: Importance of Ongoing Dialogue [Storytelling] w/ Customers | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
I tend not to take business advice from rockers, let alone ones with a past, shall we say, as checkered as Led Zeppelin, but their 1969, B-side hit “Communications Breakdown” has some worthwhile tidbits beyond Robert Plant coping with...
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a great article this is that is all about listening, continuous conversation, and storytelling. Written by Vick Vaishnavi, it goes way beyond what other posts on listening cover. Yeah!


I like that the author distinguishes between hearing and listening in customer relationships -- and what listening to customers really looks like as a business activity that moves the organization forward. 


The quality of your listening with customers, the quality of your ongoing dialogue, will determine how fast you will grow, but also your ability to be sustainable. Ultimately what Vaishnavi is talking about is having dialogue and storytelling as a core competence.


Now in fairness, he never mentions storytelling. But it makes total sense that when in dialogue with customers you want to consciously evoke stories so you can understand their authentic experiences.


And as the author points out, dialogue is a two-way street just like storytelling is. That means shifting your interactions with customers from a "I'll listen to you and take your info back to the org" to "I'll listen to your experience and share in return."


The author does not mention exactly what to say in these customer interactions but here we can take some steps from the storytelling playbook:

  1. use a story prompt to actually evoke an experience
  2. listen delightedly/appreciatively
  3. ask reflective questions to get to meaning ("what did you take away from that experience? what did that mean to you? tell me about the impact this had on you..., etc.)
  4. Share all the things you appreciate about what the customer told you
  5. Depending on the context, you might even have an opportunity to share an experience in return


Listening, dialogue, storytelling -- these will all bring great benefits to your business!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Carol Sherriff's comment, September 7, 2013 11:53 AM
Great article and great comments - also demonstrates the power of a story hook to get you to read something. He had me a Led Zeppelin!
Karen Dietz's comment, September 7, 2013 1:04 PM
Yes, Led Zeppelin did the trick for me too, Carol! Many thanks for your comment.
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Got Stories? Now What? 3 Best Ways to Amplify My Content

Got Stories? Now What? 3 Best Ways to Amplify My Content | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

This is a quick article with an important point to make: OK, I got my biz stories, but where is the best place to share them to reach wider audiences (and find customers, and grow my business)?


Well this post tells you. I've added it into my 'great to know & get it done' pile. 


I hope it helps you too, and takes some of the mystery out of "I got stories, now what?"


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 30, 2013 9:44 AM

Interesting concept for marketing departments and entrepreneurs. Use to grow your customer stories.

Ken Morrison's comment, August 31, 2013 9:45 AM
I agree that SlideShare is great when used wisely. Find an audience. Find a need. Share something valuable. Support others.
Karen Dietz's comment, September 1, 2013 5:02 PM
Thank you Hans, Ron and Ken for your comments & contributing your insights. Enjoy your weekend!
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Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story

Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
When Martin Luther King, Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial fifty years ago and spoke to a great people about their greater future, he didn’t say, “I have a plan.”
Karen Dietz's insight:

This is a fabulous article by Daniel Burris about his term 'futureview' which leads to the creation of a future story. Every business needs a future story.


A future story is how your business is contributing to the realization of a dream that generates a better world. Notice I didn't say it is the realization of a dream like 'make more money.' Futureview and a future story are all about you and your customers/clients together are creating a better place for all because of your products/service.


We just finished editing the chapter on organizational change and storytelling (hah--that topic is a book unto itlself!) for the bokk "Business Storytelling for Dummies" and discussed Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have A Dream" speech.  As Burris points out, he never said, "I have a plan"! Unfortunately, that's what most business people do.


Get on your 'futureview', figure out your future story, and have more fun doing both. It is a way to keep continually inspired, and be continually inspiring. 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


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romduck's curator insight, August 28, 2013 8:28 AM

Sharing the VISION means sharing the POINT!

Kati Sipp's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:29 PM

an excellent point. 

Karen Dietz's comment, August 29, 2013 9:44 PM
So true romduck! And thanks for your comments Jean-Philippee and Kati.
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Storytelling--The #1 Business Skill Of The Next 5 Years

Storytelling--The #1 Business Skill Of The Next 5 Years | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Last year, a pale woman with crazy eyebrows and a keytar strapped to her back made a video of herself, wearing a kimono and holding up hand-Sharpied signs on a street in Melbourne. One by one, the
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a fabulous article by author Shane Snow about the power of storytelling. And it's a terrific twist on how storytelling was used -- on the streets and part of a Kickstarter campaign.


I love people's creativity and their ability to find amazing and ingenious solutions around problems. This article has a great story, links it to business applications, and is inspiring to boot. What more could you ask for?!


Have fun reading this article. You don't need to get as wild as Amanda Palmer -- but then again, maybe you do :) In any event, it shows how storytelling is showing up in different modes to make an impact.


Many thanks to fellow curator Daniel Watson @rhodanmc and http://business-improvement.rhodan.com.au/ for suggesting this article!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 27, 2013 12:48 PM
Thank you David, Penelope, and Ron for your comments and insights!
Penelope's comment, August 27, 2013 10:37 PM
You're welcome, Karen. Thanks for sharing this great article. Loved it!
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Once Upon A Time At The Office: 10 Storytelling Tips To Help You Be More Persuasive

Once Upon A Time At The Office: 10 Storytelling Tips To Help You Be More Persuasive | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Storytelling is the most effective to way to get your point across. Here are some expert tips for doing it right.
Karen Dietz's insight:

It has been awhile since I've curated a basic primer on business storytelling -- why it's important and how to do it.


So to avoid having to hunt through all the articles on the Just Story It site, you can read this recent article written by David Lavenda and get all the tips. The advice here is really good as a first course.


There are times when business stories can be longer than 3-5 minutes, so don't be a slave to point #2. Yet this time limit will help you when starting out.


And point #9 made me laugh. My high school English class was all about reading literature, not telling stories. Even in my creative writing classes I don't think we ever shared our stories out loud -- it was too embarrassing! And speech classes in high school and college definitely were not about telling stories -- it was all about sharing organized information :)  But other than that part, the rest of #9 is spot on -- practice your stories with a friendly audience.


The last sentence suggests signing up for a storytelling workshop (yes!!). But then it directs you to a link promising online workshops (ehhhh -- it is almost impossible to teach this oral art form online without a live person on the other end). The workship link provided just goes to a website for a global consulting company giving communication workshops. So that doesn't work.


Anyway, enjoy the 'refresher' article!


Review written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 2013 1:12 PM
Petra -- love your comment! It is so true and to the point :)
Audrey's comment, September 3, 2013 4:50 PM
Thank you for this. I have started using the storytelling technique for one of my psychology topics.
Karen Dietz's comment, September 4, 2013 3:16 PM
How wonderful Audrey! I think you'll get great results. Narrative therapy is powerful stuff.
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The benefits of Appreciative Inquiry--a core storytelling process

The benefits of Appreciative Inquiry--a core storytelling process | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Have you ever heard the phrase: People join organizations, but leave managers. What would your employees say about you?


Via AlGonzalezinfo
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is a great little primer on Appreciative Inquiry (AI) that you can use in your story work. Why? Because the bedrock of AI is storytelling. Evoking and listening to the stories of others is step one when using AI.


The article comes from a podcast with David Hain, and is written up as an article by Al Gonzales. Hain or Gonzales don't mention the role of storyteling in AI, but AI is a fabulous approach and process to use when working with stories -- either as a small business evoking stories from clients, marketing departments seeker deeper relationships with customers, or an enterprise wanting to work with the power of stories in change initiatives or other internal applications.


Hain is a fellow curator and someone I've followed for awhile. I always enjoy his material. Thanks David the podcast and for fellow curator AlGonzalezinfo for writing the article and sharing it!


Enjoy this brief piece and getting a handle on AI.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, August 19, 2013 11:28 PM

Muy interesante.

Kevin Watson's curator insight, August 21, 2013 7:58 AM

Great article!

Karen Dietz's comment, August 29, 2013 9:48 PM
Many thanks for your comments Anjela, Vilma, and kjcoach! I think AI has many benefits to bring to all of us.
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The Ways Storytelling Helped Raise $6.8 Mil in 24 Hrs

The Ways Storytelling Helped Raise $6.8 Mil in 24 Hrs | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
How does a charitable institution raise $6.8 million in one single day?  Ask Columbia University, and their agency, Story WorldWide.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is a terrific example of Columbia University (CU) using storytelling, combined with other techniques, to create an exceedingly effective fundraising campaign. As story colleague Omar Kattan writes in this article, CU and their fundraising partner took several steps at the same time. They developed:


  1. A content hub on Facebook containing the mission and story of Giving Day told through an animated film.
  2. A donation form, leaderboard, YouTube videos and two live streaming round-table discussions with online chat components.
  3. They also also provided regularly updated content, ongoing conversation management and rapid-response troubleshooting during the 24-hour fundraising event. 


It was a concentrated effort that won big. I particularly liked point #3 -- including ongoing conversation in the mix. Conversation and story sharing is critically important when using stories in fundraising. When the organization shares a story, it prompts a story in return. So make sure you provide for this as you work with your business stories!


And I like how Omar also included links to the actual stories the campaign used. The video from CU on the website is more a promo piece than a story. But stories were part of the campaign and it made a difference.


Go read the article, look at the other amazing stats shared, and enjoy the stories.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Toon Hero Lets You Build Digital Storylines With Famous Characters On The iPad

Toon Hero Lets You Build Digital Storylines With Famous Characters On The iPad | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The Toon Hero app is aimed at enabling anyone to create digital storylines with some of their favorite characters from a variety of content owners.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Hey -- it's time for more weekend fun! With this new iPad app, you can now take your business stories and build them using familiar cartoon characters. Yippee!!


Authors galore keep suggesting that adding humor to business stories is a big win. People love it. And they like comics. Combine the two together with this app!


It was designed for kids -- but who cares? Be a kid again, have fun playing with this app, and give a jolt of humor and creativity to your biz stories, and watch the results.


If I wasn't writing my last chapter on stories and change for Business Storytelling for Dummies, I'd be absorbed with this app and posting some stories to my website. Maybe next weekend I'll get to play!


So have fun you all :))


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content Just Story It at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 9, 2013 5:59 PM
My pleasure Juliana and your points are well taken. I wish I had more time to actually try out each tool I come across. I hope this one works well. I figure if a kid can do it, so can I :) And to your point -- yes, if you know 'how' to craft a compelling story, you will win with this app. So you've got to be a good storyteller first.
Hollie Lancarte's curator insight, August 11, 2013 5:28 PM

Our campus focus of writing has another option here!

Karen Dietz's comment, August 29, 2013 9:48 PM
Great Hollie!
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The Disappearing Sales Process & the Role of Story

The Disappearing Sales Process & the Role of Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"Twenty-five years ago, I was but a mere snot-nosed kid out of college who suddenly decided that law school was not in the future. With a recession in full swing, and a need to pay the rent, I took the first job offered and went into sales."

Karen Dietz's insight:

When I first saw this article, I thought, "Hmmmm interesting." Then as I started to read it, I understood the implications for business storytelling. And it is significant, particularly if you want to grow your bottom line. And this goes for both entrepreneurs and enterprises. Heck, it even applies to non-profits and associations!


Here's the gist: author Scott Gillum of gyro and Forbes have just released a new FREE e-book andone of the chapters is on how the sales process has dramatically changed. First, if Forbes is saying this, it's time to pay attention.


Gillum says that prospects complete 57% of the sales process themselves before they ever contact you because they've been reading up on you, visiting your websites, looking at reviews and recommendations, etc. In other words, they've been reading YOUR STORIES -- that either you are sharing with them via your website, blog, etc. and the stories others are telling about you.


Stories sell. One of the steps Gillum suggests is making sure you have an active content (read storytelling) strategy in place.


Looks like it's time to rethink the sales process. I like how Gillum has charts to share that help make his point. And his thoughts in the article's final paragraphs? We all need to take those to heart.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Biz Storytelling for Dummies: Marketing Chapter Done!

Biz Storytelling for Dummies: Marketing Chapter Done! | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

See that photo above? Yep -- that's what I look like today! After a marathon writing session of four 16-hour days and sleepless nights, the Marketing/Branding chapter for Business Storytelling For Dummies is finally in the hands of co-author Lori Silverman.


Lori is now going to whip those pages into shape and backfill with additional critical material. We make an awesome collaborative team coming up with content, and I couldn't do this without her.


Whew! I am so excited about this one, even though it was the toughest one to write. Why was it so hard? Because of all the amazing material that is out there on storytelling and marketing -- and all the links and examples to share with you.


Truly, storytelling and marketing requires its own book, not a mere 21 pages. But we hope we've offered perspective, strategy, and how-to steps that you can put to use immediately. And no, I'm not writing the "Marketing and Business Storytelling for Dummies" book! I'll let someone else do that marathon :)


And hey -- only 2 chapters left! Lori's writing "Selling With Stories" and tomorrow (after I get some sleep), I'm writing "Using Stories to Spark Change." Woo hoo!!!! Almost to the finish line :)


If you want to pre-order the book, it's available form Amazon here: http://www.amazon.com/Business-Storytelling-Dummies-Personal-Finance/dp/1118661214/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1375817251&sr=8-1&keywords=business+storytelling+for+dummies 


Many thanks for all of your support as we go through this intense writing process. I so appreciate all of the encouragement and well wishes over the last 4 months. You all keep me going! I hope you like the results :))


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Let Me Tell You “About Me” - Seven Story Learning

Let Me Tell You “About Me” - Seven Story Learning | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

"Why the story on your about me page matters and how to improve it. Guest post by Daniel McInerny, The Comic Muse.

 

My passion is to help businesses and organizations tell their stories. I am an author of fiction for both children and adults. I spend my days immersed in storytelling.

 

So why does my “About Me” page stink on ice?

 

It’s not an official about.me page. My “About Me” page is found via the “Hello!” tab on my navigation bar. Although I’m currently working on a much more effective “About Me” presentation, I’m going to leave this one up for awhile so that you can make a meticulous study of its multitudinous awfulness.

 

What’s so awful about it?"


Via Gregg Morris
Karen Dietz's insight:

I absolutely love Daniel McInerny's honesty and transperancy in writing his About Page for his website.


About Pages are hard to do! We are just too close and can't see the forest for the trees. So one easy step to take is get outside help. Hire a company or ask friends and colleagues to help you.


And even better, Daniel writes this as a back story about his process. Brilliant! We get a back story and lessons wrapped up in one great package.


Enjoy and thank you Daniel for sharing! And thank you fellow curator and story maven Gregg Morris for finding and sharing this article :)

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Gordon Diver's comment, August 7, 2013 3:19 PM
Great share Karen - Some excellent suggestions that I'll be sure to incorporate
Karen Dietz's comment, August 7, 2013 8:15 PM
Hans, even I get help for my About page -- and it is still a work in progress!
Karen Dietz's comment, August 7, 2013 8:16 PM
Yes, Kati -- that is a unique twist to include in your About page. And Gordon, glad you like the suggestions. Time to revisit my own and update it!
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Business Storytelling For Dummies -- Karen Dietz & Lori Silverman

Business Storytelling For Dummies -- Karen Dietz & Lori Silverman | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

http://www.amazon.com/Business-Storytelling-Dummies-Personal-Finance/dp/1118661214/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373129698&sr=8-1&keywords=business+storytelling+for+dummies

"An effective communication tool for ages, storytelling has come of age in the business world. Storytelling and business narratives have proven to be an effective communication strategy, and Business Storytelling For Dummies helps you to accurately translate data, facts, and figures into rich, captivating messages tailored to any situation or audience."

Karen Dietz's insight:

If you have been wondering why I haven't been curating as much these days it's because I've been buried in intense publisher deadlines writing this book with Lori. Here's the link:

http://www.amazon.com/Business-Storytelling-Dummies-Personal-Finance/dp/1118661214/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1373129698&sr=8-1&keywords=business+storytelling+for+dummies 


We began writing in April. Trying to keep up with client work, writing, and curating has been daunting at times, like this last week! The writing has been so non-stop that I'm now wearing a wrist brace because my right arm is now so over used. Chiropractors and acupuncturists have been enormously helpful in relieving the carpel tunnel that has developed.

 

Despite the long days and working weekends, the book is exciting to produce. We've got chapters on:

  1. How to figure out the ROI of story projects
  2. What happens when you translate an oral story into different media
  3. How to bring data and story together so you don't lose the power of storytelling
  4. Different narrative types you'll find in business
  5. How to expand and contract a story
  6. And much more!

 

Upcoming chapters focus on using stories in sales, change efforts, raising funds, and how to launch story projects within your company.

 

Hopefully not much will be cut in the editing process! But never fear -- if material ends up on the cutting room floor we'll turn it into blog articles to share with you.

 

Today I'm doing final edits on the 'Expanding and contracting a story', then turning my attention for the next several day to the chapter on 'Storytelling to fund your passion'. Whew!

 

Final deadlines for all the chapters are in early August. Publication is in November 2013. Whoopee! We'll have to have a party :)) And my husband deserves sainthood -- he's taken over all household duties, makes sure I eat, and schedules at least one break per week to keep me going.

 

Stay tuned for more updates! Now -- back to curating a few pieces for you, and writing the next chapters :))  Many many thanks for your patience and continued support.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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Karen Dietz's comment, August 6, 2013 3:11 PM
Hi Hans! Yes, the book is available for pre-order on Amazon. Use the link inside the article to get to it :) I'm so tickled you want to buy it! Many thanks.
Hans Heesterbeek's comment, August 6, 2013 4:18 PM
Yes karin, I sold the book, pre-order, have to wait till december or so.... but good things take while, isn't it?
Karen Dietz's comment, August 7, 2013 8:14 PM
Yes, good things do take awhile :) Thanks Hans!

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