Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Growing leader's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com
Curated by Karen Dietz
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7 Great iPad Apps for Creating Comic Strips for Biz Stories

7 Great iPad Apps for Creating Comic Strips for Biz Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

The art of comic creation is one of the best representation of creativity at work. As teachers and educators, we can use the power and versatility of iPad to cultivate a creative culture within our classes and among our students through helping them tinker with and design comics. Here is a list of some great iPad apps you can use for this purpose...


Via Baiba Svenca
Karen Dietz's insight:

What fun! Looking for a creative way to share your business stories? Try turning them into a comic book.


Here is a list of apps (I found this on fellow curator @Baiba Svenca's 
 Digital Presentations in Education scoop.it) for the iPad to help you do this.


For folks like me who's drawing skills are at the level of stick figures, it looks like the first 3 on the list are the best. Some of the other tools require actual drawing/sketching skills.


Hope you have fun playing with these :))


This was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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LundTechIntegration's curator insight, November 5, 2013 7:50 PM

Great resources for CCSS

Susan Connor's curator insight, November 21, 2013 8:50 PM

Comic Strips... who would have thought

 

Ruby Rennie Panter's curator insight, May 30, 2015 4:41 AM

Creating comic strips can be a useful way to combine creativity, narrative and multimodal writing. More importantly - it's fun!

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5 Things Every Fab Marketing Story Needs

5 Things Every Fab Marketing Story Needs | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Here on Copyblogger, you've seen us talk many times about how to tell a terrific marketing story. Why? Because stories are fundamental to how we communi
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's a good review of 5 essential elements every story needs -- especially for marketing.


Every story needs a protagonist -- called a hero here. Focus on 'protagonist' instead of hero so you don't get caught automatially creating a hero story. Search this collection for 'core stories' and you'll get a better understanding of the different types of marketing stories available to you. Also search 'marketing' for other insights on not getting stuck in 'hero' mentality. (PS -- I'm not 'anti-hero'. I just want to open our minds to what else is out there).


That's my only quibble :)) Other than that, the article has solid tips. And check out the additional resources listed at the end!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Penelope's comment, October 31, 2013 7:59 PM
I love Copyblogger!
Karen Dietz's comment, November 2, 2013 2:39 PM
Yes, I love Copyblogger too, Penelope. Lots of great resources there.
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Emotions Making Marketing (and Stories) Go Viral

Emotions Making Marketing (and Stories) Go Viral | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Heat maps of viral content show what compels us to share.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Connecting with people emotionally is the bedrock of effective storytelling. But what emotions produce results? Fear? Anger? Joy? Hope?


This article lays out the emotions that when activated, can result in viral sharing. The research is fascinating.


And here's what I know about storytelling and how this relates: sure, stories can arouse fear, ire, anger, indignation, etc. But ultimately those feelings need to be resolved in some way and transformed to another emotion where people feel empowered to take action.


So fear and anger can still be present ("I'm so angry about how I'm being treated!") but also connected to hope so that by taking some action, change can happen ("So I'm going to sign this petition." or "So I'm going to purchase this product.").


I know, this is tricky and imperfect. And this article helps us sort through what to do. Good examples and tips are shared, along with the results companies have experienced.


Storytelling isn't the only way to engage emotions, and you may think of many other ways to emotionally engage customers and prospects. I hope this article gives you lots of ideas.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Dr. Helen Teague's comment, November 1, 2013 8:59 PM
Thank you for your detailed insight...I appreciate your opinion!
Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, November 1, 2013 9:02 PM

Post authors Kelsey Libert and Kristin Tynski, 10-24-13 discuss viral coefficients which are the total number of new viewers generated by one existing viewer.
Interesting Stats: 5.3 trillion display ads shown online yearly, 400 million tweets sent daily, 144,000 hours of YouTube video uploaded daily, and 4.75 billion pieces of content shared on Facebook daily

Karen Dietz's writes in her curated review:

Connecting with people emotionally is the bedrock of effective storytelling. But what emotions produce results? Fear? Anger? Joy? Hope?

 

This article lays out the emotions that when activated, can result in viral sharing. The research is fascinating...And this article helps us sort through what to do. Good examples and tips are shared, along with the results companies have experienced.

Karen Dietz's comment, November 2, 2013 2:37 PM
Thank you David, Liz, Denyse, Whitequest, and Helen for your comments!
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Awesome! #Story50 tweets w/ tips for biz storytellers

All the storytelling wisdom that online video guru @AdamWestbrook distilled over years, and then gave out for free on twitter on Wed 23rd October, 2013. Cheers Adam!
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a cool thing Adam Westbrook (digital storyteller) has done -- sharing 50 tweets and each tweet shares a story tip!


I've read through most of them and think they are great. There are plenty of good things to remember here.


Fun and good insights for us all here. Enjoy!


Many thanks go to  for finding and suggesting this post to me.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Gav Morris's curator insight, October 30, 2013 7:22 AM

And it shows use of Storify.

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Want Kickstarter Success? You Better Have A Good Story

Want Kickstarter Success? You Better Have A Good Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
More than half of all Kickstarter projects fail. Want yours to be among the lucky few? Having a great product isn't enough. You need to connect with...
Karen Dietz's insight:

This is a quick article with a very good point -- if you want your product to sell, it better have a story attached to it. Especially when launching a Kickstarter or Indiegogo campaign.


This is because most product launches on Kickstarter and Indiegogo are often challenging the status quo with innovative products. To break through the interia and get people to pay attention, a story is essential.


There are good tips in the article written by Slava Menn about how to start with the 'why' of your product, and how to craft the story that connects with people's emotions.


What's good for Kickstarter/Indiegogo campaigns is good for any one selling a product or service. So go for those stories!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Is there Story 2.0? What's Surprising About The Next Wave Of Narrative

Is there Story 2.0? What's Surprising About The Next Wave Of Narrative | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Wrapping up a three-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the problem with interactivity and some eternal truths of storytelling.
Karen Dietz's insight:

In his last and final installment, Jonathan Gottschall explores what the future of storytelling is. Is storytelling changing? Is it morphing into something new and revolutionary? Are we evolving from stortelling 1.0 to 2.0?


I won't give it away -- you'll have to read the article. He has good points to make about 'revolutionary' literary forms, masterpieces, and our storytelling DNA.


I do agree with his conclusions and I know you will enjoy this article.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Forget Storytelling: Think Story Sharing!

Forget Storytelling: Think Story Sharing! | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Business storytelling author and thought leader in the field interviews Karen Dietz about her insights into business storytelling. Listen to the free podcast.

Karen Dietz's insight:

Woo hoo! My friend and colleague Annette Simmons (author of The Story Factor, Whoever Tells the Best Story Wins, and Territorial Games) and I had quite a chat recently about the ins-and-outs of business storytelling and Part 1 is now available as a free podcast.


The link only lasts a short time -- so go to iTunes to download the podcast here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/episode-2-karen-dietz/id735863915?i=169716216&mt=2 


We had a great time together and talk about the importance of story sharing instead of storytelling, why I prefer NOT to do single story workshops with clients, and what to pay attention to when working with stories in organizations. Read Annette's intro for more goodies you will hear about in the podcast.


Annette wrote one of the first books on business storytelling and is one of the pioneers who broke ground for us all. See me humbly bowing to her. She's a kick-ass kid and I have learned much from her.


Enjoy this conversation as we talk about how we work with stories, what we've learned along the way, and why we are so passionate about storytelling


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Rita's curator insight, October 24, 2013 2:13 PM

Share stories...that's what people want to hear. 

Jim Signorelli,Story-Lab's curator insight, October 25, 2013 7:54 AM

Annette Simmons,  one of the "Storyati," has a new weekly podcast. 

In this, her second podcast, and while interviewing my delightful story friend Karen Dietz,  they talk about their connection to story, what it means to them and how they help others make the most of its power. Karen,  who claims she's more of a story scholar than a storyteller, does a pretty good job of telling her own story about some funny things that happened on the way to her doctorate.    Highly recommend a listen and subscribing to these podcasts. 


Don Cloud's curator insight, October 25, 2013 9:25 PM

The best stories are those worth sharing.  Even better stories are those that a leader helps his/her people to create together.

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3 New Story Types For Businesses Connected to the Bottom Line

3 New Story Types For Businesses Connected to the Bottom Line | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Do we really care about how companies treat their employees? How they engage with local communities, and how ethical they are? Does it make a difference when we consider buying their product or working for them?
Karen Dietz's insight:

The original title of this article is "Too Many Feelings and Not Enough Facts in CSR Strategy". CSR means Corporate Social Responsibility. The post is by Bruce Rogers from Forbes and he discusses a major shift that is happening between consumers and businesses: consumers will buy if the company walks its talk regarding:

  1. Citizenship (supports good causes and protects the environment, for example). 
  2. Governance (is responsibly run that behaves ethically and is open and transparent in its business dealings)
  3. Workplace (is an appealing place to work who treats its employees well)


These are 3 new and important story types businesses must focus on telling. I say 'new' because they are laying dormant and are not widely recognized for their huge significance. In truth, each story type contains multiple stories you can tell -- one story for each type is usually insufficient.


In the article Rogers shares his interview with Kasper Ulf Nielsen, Executive Partner at Reputation Institute and CB Bhattacharya, E.ON Chair Professor in Corporate Responsibility at European School of Management and Technology. They discuss the results of a new published study on the topic (with a link for more data).


I love this point that is shared: ..."56-61% consumers across the 15 largest markets in the world are neutral or not sure if the companies can be trusted to deliver on CSR dimensions: Citizenship, Governance, and Workplace. The reason for that is two fold: (1) companies have not communicated about the things they do in a relevant and clear way, and (2) they are doing many programs, which are not relevant to their stakeholders,” says Kasper Nielsen. Holy Cow!!


The reason? “The problem lies in the lack of strategic integration. The biggest challenge is to integrate CSR practices into the strategy of the companies and not treat it as an add-on. Currently most CSR professionals are housed in communications and PR departments, but CSR can and should infiltrate every department – from supply chain, procurement, innovation, manufacturing, HR, all the way to disposal. To accomplish this, CSR officers need to have their voice heard, particularly in the C-suite and the Board, so that the corporate culture and focus shifts from the single to the triple bottom line. The 2013 CSR RepTrak® study has documented the business case for companies to be socially responsible. Companies must now realize that creating social value is a prerequisite to creating business value,” says CB Bhattacharya.


The lessons? 

  1. Make CSR part of your core business activities, not a department shuffled off to the side
  2. Craft and share the 3 kinds of stories


What action steps to take?

There are several listed in the article. And the study is well worth reading also for more data and findings. You will be able to come up with a list of specific action steps that fit your organization.


If you really want your business or enterprise to take off, pay attention to what is happening here. And start working on building these stories to share based on the concrete actions your business takes on Citizenship, Governance, and the Workplace.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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7 Content Marketing Tips to Grab Your Audience's Attention: Story Stuff

7 Content Marketing Tips to Grab Your Audience's Attention: Story Stuff | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Content marketing is hard. Here are 7 content marketing tips and resources that will get you so much more with much less. It’s about working smarter, not harder.
Karen Dietz's insight:

From Pratik Dholakiya, a guest author for Copyblogger, comes a great article on how to capture someone's attention for gaining readeres, customers and fans.


Many of the 7 tips connect with storytelling. In fact tip #2 is: tell stories!


Tip #1 is about headlines. I just wrote an article about how to title stories to entice people to read. Especially when shared digitally. As Bullas says, if the headline doesn't grab them they won't read your material. So headlines are critically important if you want folks to read your stories.


Tip #5 is all about being conversational. And that is critically important in your storytelling. No one likes reading material when you sound like a stuffed shirt :))


Tip #6 focuses on making your audience look good. When we think about this in story terms, it's making sure your customer is the hero of the story, not you.


All of the tips are solid. And there are quite a lot of good points here. So enjoy the discussion and the gems shared.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What Are Success Stories Really Good For?

What Are Success Stories Really Good For? | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Some cultural critics believe business war stories aren't instructive. What can we learn from that?
Karen Dietz's insight:

The author here, Drake Baer, is questioning the value of business success stories -- in particular, memoirs of successful Titans about how they became, well, successful.


The main point is that life is complex and these kinds of memoirs are  probably not helpful because life is too complex. So these stories lead us down a primrose path that ultimately is not hepful. What is helpful though is practice. In other words, if you want to be a high jumper, keep jumping higher.


Yet there are important principles about stories to tease out here. 


Life IS complex. Yet stories -- of both successes and failures -- help us figure out our way through. Why? Because stories of successes and failures contain within them problem-solving structures. They help us figure out how to solve the problems we face in our own lives and careers. Different stories from different people contain different and similar problem-solving structures. This is a good thing. So listening to/reading these kinds of stories can actually be very helpful.


On the other hand, I also believe that a diet exclusively of success stories can be problematic. Which is why I also added stories of failures into the mix. Because failure stories are really all about how we recovered from mistakes we've made -- and what we've learned along the way. Customers and employees want to know these kinds of stories. And they too build trust.


The notion of practice is an interesting one. I can practice 'work' or 'career' all I want but in the end, if I don't have guidance in some form, success is harder to figure out and takes longer to show up. So instead of discounting failure and success stories, I think I would want to listen to and read lots of them. So maybe success is less about practice and more about persistence.


Plus, both success and failure stories give us hope. I always remember the story about Rowland Hussey Macy, Sr. who founded Macy's department story -- and failed 4 times before succeeding. This gives me hope to keep trying :)


I do agree with the notion of practice -- especially if you want to become a better storyteller. That's the main pathway to improvement: learn how to tell a great story and then practice practice practice :)


OK -- enough pontificating for the day :) Go read the article for yourself and let me know if you agree or disagree!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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The Wild (?) Future Of Storytelling

The Wild (?) Future Of Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Think "Choose Your Own Adventure" crossed with the holodeck and Amazon.com.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here is an article reporting on the latest trends in business storytelling. Some of it is hype, some of it has been going on for centuries, but it's an interesting read at the same time. Here are my thoughts on the trends the author, Kim Gaskins, lists (Gaskin is reporting on a study conducted by Latitude consulting):


  1. Stories come out of the screen and into the physical world. OK -- Disney has been doing this for decades. So has Nike at their main campus. It seems what is new is that more companies will be consciously doing this. 
  2. Characters will become connections. That means you can actually interact with the fictional James Bond in real time instead of watching a movie of him. Hmmm -- interesting.
  3. Stories will unfold from different vantage points. That means the Fairy Godmother tells her version of the Cinderella story. Well, that's been going on for centuries so I'm not sure how 'futuristic' this is.
  4. Stories will be told 24/7. OK -- stories have always been told 24/7. Some traditional cultures stay up days to hear a complete epic being told. What they mean here though is that technology allows us to never sleep :) Actually, the fictional characters never sleep and keep living on in some virtual reality. You can get text messages during the night when they do something interesting, LOL.
  5. Storytelling goes bottom up. That means audiences get to co-create stories they are involved in by contributing to the story line. Sounds like fun. Think of this as crowdsourced storytelling. But will the stories be any good? Time will tell.
  6. Stories will make the world a better place. Well, I hope so. Stories themselves are neutral. It's how we use the stories -- for good or evil -- that define us. So this is really about character, not stories. Stories can enliven or debilitate us. For those choosing to do good -- may the Force be with you!
  7. Videos will offer one-click storefronts. That means brand are imbedding a 'buy' button into videos. Not sure if this negates the point above or is a de-evolution :) Transactional storytelling (I tell you a story, you buy something) is not transformational storytelling, which is what happens when stories are used to make the world a better place. Still, transactional storytelling has a place and helps boost a business' bottom line. 


At the end of the article is the link to the full research report -- that also articulates different kinds of storytelling audiences. 


Many thanks to fellow curator  for recommending this article!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Karen Dietz's comment, October 16, 2013 12:52 AM
Good comment Michelle. Offering frameworks is great and valuable for clients that need them when well facilitated. I get that frameworks/structures for you are ‘true storytelling.’ There is more than one way to skin a cat, however. I come from the world of oral training in storytelling. There’s a huge difference between oral storytelling training and writing for those who are reading this. In oral story telling, listening skills come first – learning how to listen for stories, learning how to listen for how a story wants to be told, learning how to listen for key messages and deeper meaning. Skills in storytelling and better crafting quickly and organically emerges. I also help clients know the types of stories they need for different applications. That does not negate your work, it's just different and readers need to know that. My clients are just like yours – sweating their next presentation and wanting to do well. And we build repertoires together so they gain confidence and can excel. All of my clients want to know 'the structure of a good story' and I provide that to them -- at the right time for the work we do together. Yet for the last few years, I never even have to focus on structures. I've found that people already know how to tell great stories and my work is to simply remind them of that -- and coach them to excel in sharing their stories in personal, vulnerable, and powerful ways that connects people and moves people to action. And to be self-sufficient. But in the end, it's the ongoing practice of telling stories that for me creates great storytellers. Our end goals are the same. I'm certainly not an armchair academic pontificating. I come from the school of hard knocks with my storytelling experience in business for 25+ years. Working with stories is careful and dangerous work, not the next tool or trend or entertaining fluff as some people relate to it (not you). That being said, bravo for helping people in companies in the ways you do. My apologies if you thought I was discarding your work when in my own inept way I was trying to broaden my reader's knowledge. And likewise I challenge my other colleagues to expand their thinking. And I think you and I are aligned in all the ways that really count. LOL, I've created a lot of my own tools about story structures! Although I’ve abandoned most of them. But I do worry about folks (again, not you) who want to reduce storytelling to simple formulas when it is anything but – which is what I see and experience A LOT. And just to be totally honest, in our new book "Business Storytelling for Dummies' Lori and I offer lots of structures for people to play with depending on different needs and applications. And we had to focus on story elements for crafting stories. So they have their place. Yet our caveat is always to craft stories first, then check for story elements and structures to make sure pieces weren’t forgotten. We do it this way because our focus is still on building listening and oral telling skills. Open dialogue like this is really important. I agree with you that we need many voices in the story space. And those voices need to be willing to share with each other, and question each other. In the end we are both focused on the same things -- helping to make the world a better place. We just get there in different ways.
Michelle Nelson LeBow's comment, October 17, 2013 5:34 AM
Karen, I know very little about your story approach. I'm flattered you seem to think you know so much about mine. We've never even spoken!<br><br>I'd be pleased to have a real-time conversation with you about story ideology, philosophy, and approach. Until that happens, I believe, and I'm certain you'd agree, the professional and supportive course of action is to reserve the cautioning, worrying, questioning, and assuming. Looking forward to talking.
Karen Dietz's comment, October 17, 2013 11:26 AM
Then contact me Michelle. My information is here: http://www.juststoryit.com/contact.htm And BTW -- my job as a curator (and a professional in the field) is to support, caution, worry, question and assume. And for all of us to learn and teach and grow. I am not picking on you personally as I keep trying to explain. I shared with everyone in my comment above about how I work as a way for all of my readers to understand differences, not make you wrong as I keep saying.
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Sharing Stories: 5 Ways Face-to-Face Meetings Are Better For Biz Results

Sharing Stories: 5 Ways Face-to-Face Meetings Are Better For Biz Results | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Social media and online networking have revolutionized business. But are there times when face to face meetings are still beneficial? You bet.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Yes -- business stories shared in person are your highest degree of leverage. They produce the best results. Now here is an article that explains all the advantages of face-to-face meetings. Which is really important to remember in this age of the internet and social media connections.


Get your game on and accelerate your business results by meeting in person with customers, colleagues, prospects, vendors, employees, and others.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Lloyd Martin's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:15 PM

“positive emotional experience” — can only be achieved face to face. 

Constance Jones Collier's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:16 PM

I fully agree with Face to Face Meetings.

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A Very Simple Way to Hear the Best Stories

A Very Simple Way to Hear the Best Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Everyday your team is doing great work.  Sometimes you miss their stories.   Some folks will go home and tell their stories around the dinner table.  Others can't, or won't.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Now after all the heavy lifting of responding to John Hagel's blog post on storytelling (see the last 4 posts on 10/9 and 10/10) here's a great article on the simplest way to listen to and find great stories in your business or organization.


Easy peasy! Enjoy --


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Fab Founding + Future Story Wrapped Together: Example

Fab Founding + Future Story Wrapped Together: Example | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Before he started pink-mustache-branded Lyft John Zimmer had already started and sold Zimride. What's next in his quest to figure out how to make...
Karen Dietz's insight:

I was fascinated reading this article that shares the story about how ride-sharing company Lyft got started -- and its vision for the future.


It's a perfect example of using a Founding story plus a Future story (the positive future you and your customers are creating together) for marketing.


The founding story is well crafted and you can experience how it naturally progesses into sharing the company's Future story (actually it's more like an anecdote). So there are lots of lessons here on multiple fronts.


It's hard to find good examples of these to share so I was thrilled when this popped up on my radar screen. Have fun reading it -- and hopefully doing something similar for your business!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Halloween Fun: 10 Ghoulish GIFs Giving You Goosebumps

Halloween Fun: 10 Ghoulish GIFs Giving You Goosebumps | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
R.L. Stine's got nothing on these spooky/scary animations.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Happy Halloween everyone! And just for fun I found this collection of ghoulish gifts to share with you. Enjoy this day of spooks, ghouls, zombies, creative costumes, and (hopefully) lots of chocolate!


This was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Truth to Power: The Brand Avatar We Must Kill

Truth to Power: The Brand Avatar We Must Kill | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
I’ve been talking about brands for 20 years. Got an image, business or job layoff problem? Here’s a magical solution that works every time: the brand.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Whoa -- here's an 'stick it in your eye' post with a lot of truth to convey.


The term 'brand' and 'branding' gets even more hype than 'stories' and 'storytelling'. And this article points out one of the biggest issues with brands and branding -- truth.


We see this when business begin to be evaluated on being a 'storytelling' or a 'story doing' company. In other words, do they walk their talk? And does storytelling actually help or hinder them?


The author of this article, Patrice Chatelain, says flat out that 'brands' do not reflect what is actually happening in a company -- they only represent an ideal. When putting 'branding' and 'story doing' together then, it makes for odd bedfellows. Read her solution about what to do about this.


I'm not sure I buy her solution 100%. I think leadership at all levels of the org has to be involved. But I would love to hear what you think!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Karen Dietz's comment, October 31, 2013 12:50 PM
Good point Penelope! I wonder what will replace it?
Penelope's comment, October 31, 2013 6:56 PM
Hmm...maybe we should invent a new one and take all the credit! ;)
Karen Dietz's comment, November 2, 2013 2:38 PM
I like that idea Penelope!
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Want $$$ for your biz? Story Tips to Nail Your Next Pitch In 60 Seconds

Want $$$ for your biz? Story Tips to Nail Your Next Pitch In 60 Seconds | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
That's all the time you need to get to yes. Really.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Raising funds for your business is hard. And as the story in this article shows, you need a way to wake up interest in your company and stand out from the crowd next time you are pitching investors.


How does this connect with storytelling? How you tell your biz story to investors is different than when you tell it for marketing or leadership purposes. In particular, you have to start your story differently and then tell it in a hybrid form that is a mix of a 'future' story and a 'what we stand for' story.


The most critical piece is the beginning. And the author of this article, Sam Horn, give us a fabulous way to get started. Before you give the setting, before you set the context, there is a set of questions to ask that engage the imagination and speak to the future.


Makes perfect sense to me. And I know you will gain lots from reading this post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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malek's curator insight, October 29, 2013 6:40 PM

"Simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication." Leonardo da Vinci 

Don't worry if you found yourself reading this scoop twice. 

David Cordts's curator insight, October 30, 2013 10:12 AM

Promoting Ideas: Take the concepts and apply them to your next fundraising project at school or when you need to "sell" the principal on a new project -- good advice from the business world.

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, October 30, 2013 10:14 AM

In order to get funding, you need to get the attention. Grabbing the attention by telling the right story is a must. Once the door is open, the next question will be: "Well, what do you have? What's the plan?"

You have to prove your story, and prove the professionalism. The door opener is a moment in time, as if someone turns on the light. Once the door is open, every aspect of who you are and what you do will come to light. Make sure you're ready.

Check www.Business-Funding-Insider.com for more information and tools.

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9 Clips of Leaders Sharing All Kinds of Biz Stories

9 Clips of Leaders Sharing All Kinds of  Biz Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
When business leaders start building their business storytelling skills it can help a lot to see how other business leaders tell business stories.
Karen Dietz's insight:

My biz story colleague Shawn Callahan in Australia has put together a terrific list of leaders telling all kinds of different business stories. It's a wonderful collection for the following reasons:


  1. Each story is a different kind
  2. Each leader tells their story/stories in their own authentic style
  3. Some are stories, some are short anecdotes
  4. Polished presentations aren't around -- just honest sharing
  5. They all make an impact


Leaders sharing stories is one of the best ways to observe that all kinds of stories can make a difference. There are certainly times when a leader has to stand a deliver a well crafted finely honed story. But in daily life, leaders share stories in all kinds of ways. And that's what this collection shows.


I really like how in the text Callahan also gives us the place stories are told in some of the longer videos. That way we can skip through them and get to the storytelling.


I know I enjoyed listening to these leaders and not seeing cookie-cutter telling. I hope you enjoy them also. And find additional uses for them.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's curator insight, October 28, 2013 11:29 PM

The social web is helping to make many business leaders story tellers. If you need help with your Biz story I would contact Karen at http://www.juststoryit.com/

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Robert McKee, Screenwriting Guru, Teaches Us How Brands Tell Better Stories

Robert McKee, Screenwriting Guru, Teaches Us How Brands Tell Better Stories | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
If you want everyone from customers to colleagues to believe in your mission you need to tell them a story not make an argument.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's what I love about this article: screenwriter Robert McKee clearly explains how business language and story language are two different animals -- and why story language is so critical for business folks to master.


He does this in such an understandable way that I am going to make this post mandatory reading for my MBA students. McKee has done a far better job than me in explaining the distinction.


Most business people I work with think that if they are not speaking in business language they won't be understood or credible. Nothing could be further from the truth. And I hope you come to the same conclusion here once you read this article.


McKee then goes on to explain the critical need for sharing stories with customers, and how every brand is a story. I like this quote too: "Entrepreneurship is the most extreme use of story."


I know you will get lots of good material from this article written by Drake Baer about his recent conversation with McKee.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Jim Signorelli,Story-Lab's comment, October 24, 2013 10:51 AM
Karen, I went to McKee's Story for Business course a few weeks ago in NYC. I HIGHLY recommend. He applies many of the principles discussed in his book STORY to marketing communications. Entertaining, Illuminating and well worth the price of admission! P.S. Love the same quote you shared.
Karen Dietz's comment, October 24, 2013 4:07 PM
Hey Jim! LOL, McKee is just up the freeway from me and you'd think I'd get up to LA to take his course. Now with your recommendation I definitely have to register. Many thanks for letting me know you found it valuable. Onward!
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The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.
Karen Dietz's insight:

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).


He does a good job in laying that foundation.


I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:


1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.


2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.


Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 


Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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John Michel's curator insight, October 22, 2013 5:36 AM

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"

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Branding: 10 Strategies for Living Your Core Values (Stories)

Branding: 10 Strategies for Living Your Core Values (Stories) | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
How businesses can take their beliefs and make them real for consumers.
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a terrific article this is! There is so much talk these days (finally) about not only telling stories, but living the stories you tell. In other words, walking your talk.


Companies have always been faced with this, but in today's marketplace the stakes are higher and so is the demand from customers that businesses live what they believe in -- not just espouse stuff.


This article by Jessica Blotter covers great ground, giving 10 activities to pay attention to. And she includes specific examples to back up her points!


Many of these steps connect with storytelling. Such as: be human and express your humanity. And 'your story must transcend technology' -- meaning there needs to be a social impact (positive) that your business is having on the world. Another activity is to make sure customers are the celebrity of your brand story. In other words, the stories are not really about you, they are about them.


There are 7 other great strategies to read about. I won't give away all the activities. But I know you'll resonate with them as you read the article. And it will give you specific ideas for what you might want to do next.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Karen Dietz's comment, October 19, 2013 9:43 PM
Patricia, so glad you find the article helpful. Hope you are well!
Karen Dietz's comment, October 19, 2013 9:45 PM
Hans, you are so right -- it's not only about your product, but about what a company stands for. The article I curated today on 3 New Story Types also addresses this. Thanks for commenting!
Karen Dietz's comment, October 19, 2013 9:53 PM
Hey Jim -- I'm so glad the article really stands out for you. And I agree wholeheartedly with your comments. Would you believe I've been working with 1 client for 2 years and it's not about storytelling yet -- we are focusing about improving the organization internally so they will be able to tell a story that they live. We are almost ready to focus on storytelling as an organizational strategy. It's fascinating work. And rare, to your points above. Check out the other article I curated today on 3 new stories to tell. It's based on new research that's been released about the bottom line benefits for an organization that lives its stories. It's much better than the ''story doing' research that was released a few months ago.
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The Anatomy of a Brand Story--From Europe

The Anatomy of a Brand Story--From Europe | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Narrativity Group. Lead from the Core. Power your Culture. Create your Future
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's the updated link: 

http://www.narrativity-group.com/anatomy-of-a-brand-story/


My colleague Ashraf Ramsey from the Netherlands has spent quite a bit of time here in his latest blog post articulating the anatomy of a brand story. And it is also fascinating because his European perspective about "Americanicity" is also explained.


He focuses on 7 Up's message as an example. He talks about 3 layers of communication that must be taken into account in branding. And he makes sure to make the distinction between the product and the brand.


He also defines 'narrative' for us just so we have an added level of clarity about what narrative is, its structure, and role in branding. In the end, he gives us a view of American mythology.


I've curated this article because I think it is important to read -- especially for those of us in the U.S. Ramsey's views are both interesting and reminds us of the global nature of business. And it is certainly a different approach. 


What do you agree with -- or disagree with here?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Singapore, Kindness and a Story Game-A Biz Can Do This Too!

Singapore, Kindness and a Story Game-A Biz Can Do This Too! | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Kindness is in everyone. The Singapore Kindness Movement (SKM) wants to encourage everyone to start, show and share kindness.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Right on the heels of the last article I curated about the future of storytelling comes this article about how the Singapore Kindness Movement is using a storytelling app that's a game. The purpose is to promote being kind, gracious and friendly in communal spaces.


This is exactly wha the Wild (?) Future of Storytelling article was mentioning: stories will make the world a better place.


This is a very short article but delightful. The stories in the app are based on fairy tales. And each story is interactive.  Sounds like fun.


For businesses, it begs the question about how you want to use stories, and in what innovative ways can you do so? Would it fit with your Vision/Purpose to create a story app in a similar vein to Singapore's app? Hmmmm.


Many thanks to colleague Evelyn Clark @corpstory for pointing me to this post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Alessandro Rea's curator insight, October 17, 2013 5:10 AM

SINGAPORE, 7 March 2013 – Students and parents will have something to look forward to this term break as the Singapore Kindness Movement (SKM) announced today the launch of its first mobile game application, Kindly Ever After. Through a series of tightly-woven storylines, players are reminded of the importance of being kind, gracious and friendly in communal spaces.

 

Held at Orchard Xchange, the launch attracted lively participation of commuters, many of whom were working adults and students. Despite the morning rush, commuters stopped by the Kindly Ever After game counter to try out the game.

 

Kindly Ever After is the brainchild of four students from the Singapore Polytechnic. With Diploma in Games Design & Development, Tng Bing Rong, 19, Chng Yang Da, 19, Jack Kew Zi Jian, 19, and Shawn Cheah Chenxuan, 19, drew inspiration from the timeless closing phrase, “happily ever after”, in fairy tales.  The game features four animated stories that are real-life depictions of ungracious acts often seen onboard public transport, at hawker centres, on public roads, and in cyber spaces. Players will first be engaged in the tales of graciousness before embarking on their quest to eradicate ungracious acts committed by characters in the game.

 

In each stage, the player will have to “fire” the kind spirit towards the unkind spirit to transform the latter into a kind soul. As the game progresses, obstacles get increasingly challenging at each level. The aim is to transform unkind spirits into kindhearted souls to create a friendly and gracious environment.

 

Read More: http://kindness.sg/blog/2013/03/07/kindly-ever-after-a-fairy-tale-of-graciousness-to-come-true/#.Ul-pM5ROrEz

malek's curator insight, October 17, 2013 7:23 AM

Karen Dietz keeps hammering this fact:  our product, idea, or personal brand, is dead on arrival.Without a compelling story. Here's another inspiring example from Singapore

Suggested by Robin Good
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Learn StoryTelling -- FREE online class!

Learn StoryTelling -- FREE online class! | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
How do you tell a story? Learn to listen and inspire. Understand trends in current fiction and learn to contextualize narratives in this MOOC. Enrol for free!
Karen Dietz's insight:

Hey folks -- here is an intensive and FREE online course that really digs into crafting stories. And it is an interdisciplinary course that also covers new technologies and transmedia storytelling. Yippee!!


The course is several weeks long and is participatory. The course description says you even get to practice your stories. Click through to read the extensive description, requirements, etc. It looks like a real winner.


The only caution is that it is being billed as crafting fictional stories -- and we all know business stories are all about sharing authentic personal experiences. So keep this in mind.


Still in all -- it sounds like a fab course. I have had a number of people ask me lately where they can go to learn storytelling. Here is your answer.


If anyone takes the course, let us know if it was a good experience or not!


Many thanks to fellow curator  for recommending this article!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Back Stories! A Small Business Shows The Advantages of Offering Facility Tours

Back Stories! A Small Business Shows The Advantages of Offering Facility Tours | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Facility tours are a powerful marketing tool for the right kind of small business. Using technology to enhance the tour experience can add impact.
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a great article about how a brewery hit gold by offering tours of its facilities. This is a great way to tell a company's back story. What I like about what author Anita Campbell shares is the challenges they faced in telling their story and the successes they've had (sold out tours and a #2 national ranking + increases in revenue). 


What's a back story?? These are stories you share about the behind-the scenes of your business: how products are created, how employees serve customers, the inside scoop of sales calls, stories about your supply chain, and the like


But this doesn't have to apply only to manufacturing sites! With videos and SlideShare (just to name two tools), any business can share its back stories with the world.


So get busy. And I bet you start exerpiencing similar results as Allagash Brewing Company!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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malek's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:02 AM

Teach me, I know nothing

Show me, I learn everything

Maria Elena Leta's curator insight, October 13, 2013 1:57 PM

I'm a beerlover too and this is definitely the kind of marketing deserving a lot of claps.

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