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Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Growing executive's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com  619-235-0052
Curated by Karen Dietz
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Don't Make Tech The Default: Value of Storytelling In Person

Don't Make Tech The Default: Value of Storytelling In Person | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
PowerPoint, which reared its ugly head in the late 20th century, has become an integral part of the process and we have all learned to live with the monster; what has not changed is the role of the presenter. But the virtualization of presentations is threatening to diminish that role by taking the presenter’s personal presence—and therefore full interaction with the audience—out of the equation.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This article reminds us to be wise with technology and our storytelling endeavors. It is so easy to default to PowerPoint or video to share our business stories.


And tech tools are a good thing. I use them myself. The point of the article however, is to make sure we balance our digital storytelling with in-person storytelling.


In the end, it's all about having a clear strategy. This means putting together a 2015 storytelling strategy that includes a good mix of high tech and low tech storytelling opportunities.


Remember -- for maximum leverage and effect, in person telling is #1 on the list. Don't leave money or opportunity on the table by ignoring this.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Biz Storytelling Skills: How Do You Close A Presentation?

Biz Storytelling Skills: How Do You Close A Presentation? | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Five ways to end a speech that don't bore the audience to death.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Author Nick Morgan writing for Forbes Magazine offers us 5 ways to close a presentation.


Having tried them all out, I like them all and they all work. But from the storytelling world there is one that's left out: simply ending your story or storied presentation with your key message and/or a quote and leaving it at that.


We are most uncomfortable with that kind of ending and it takes practice to learn how to be in the silence after you've delivered such a powerful end (and every well crafted storied presentation should aim for this).


If you watch trained performance storytellers you'll see how it's done. Find your local storytelling group (www.storynet.org) and get hooked up.


There are 2 basic kinds of presentations:

  1. Those where you deliver a speech, like a keynote, and then are off the stage. Ending with your inspiring key message is a natural way to close.
  2. Then there are the types of presentations -- during meetings for example -- where discussion follows. This is where you want to deliver your key message and then use one of Morgan's techniques for engaging the audience afterwards.


In either case however, develop a strong ending that supports your well-crafted story. Deliver it. Stop. Let your message sink in. Then take your next step -- either off the stage or into a group discussion.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Krista Finstad-Milion's curator insight, December 17, 2014 3:51 AM

I personally am frustrated when a presentation ends with "Any questions?" which usually falls flat as it does not stimulate the audience to engage in a dialogue. These tips offer real alternatives.

Steve Piacente's curator insight, December 26, 2014 9:24 PM

It's not enough to open strong. You have to finish strong as well ...

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Increase Your 2015 Income With Storytelling For Sales

Increase Your 2015 Income With Storytelling For Sales | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The role of the salesperson is changing rapidly. To be a star performer its vital to provide insights. When you use storytelling for sales you will click.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Storytelling in sales is tricky and not as straightforward as it seems. Here my colleague Shawn Callahan talks about successful sales people, what they do, and how storytelling fits in. Sharing stories that create customer insights is key.


Even better, in the blog post he provides a link to a previous blog post to 4 story-based practices for fostering insight that you can use.


Don't miss this article. It gets you primed for increasing income in 2015 -- and who wouldn't want that?!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Carol Griffiths's curator insight, February 4, 12:45 PM

.......as long as the story is true, relevant and brings additional insight to the buyer...so many stories are thinly veiled self promotion...which, instead of advancing the prospects understanding of their own problem, merely serves to confuse and waste time.

 

Story telling can be powerful, I'm sure.

 

But only in the right circumstance.

 

Personally, I find prospects are very UNINTERESTED in anything that doesn't directly help them...

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Want Success? Make Your Brand Aspirational, Not Inspirational W/ A Future Story

Want Success? Make Your Brand Aspirational, Not Inspirational W/ A Future Story | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Companies that ditch tired celebrity personas and transform themselves into vehicles for realizing their customers' aspirations will transcend single...
Karen Dietz's insight:

When I read this post today I immediately thought about a particular story every business needs to craft and tell, but is often unrecognized or forgotten. That's your Future Story about your aspiration.


This article written by Charlie Brown lays out the reasoning for emphasizing "aspiration" instead of "inspiration.


For years I've been encouraging clients to develop this story as part of their core set. Your future story is all about what you aspire to create -- how your product or service, you and your customers, are making a better world. How is the future going to be different because of you/your company? That's what inquiring minds want to know.


Lots of our business stories can be inspirational. But the future story is all about aspiration. Brown makes this distinction clear and his insights are right on. I love the additional thoughts and tips he shares.


But what is a Future Story? They are hard to come by on the web. Your Future Story is shared through stories showing your commitment to something greater than yourself/your company's offerings. Think Nike or Patagonia.


What is one Just Story It aspiration/future story? Here it is:

"Monday evening I'm sitting in the staff lounge of Just In Time For Foster Youth with 2 young women in their early 20s. At 18 they were emancipated from foster care with all of their possessions in a black plastic garbage bag. Just In Time stepped in to help them get stable with housing, furnishings, school supplies, transportation...whatever they needed. We were working on their stories -- about life in foster care and their road to success. As we worked on these stories, we laugh and cry together. We find the paths to share their stories in ways that work best for them.


These are often gut-wrenching stories to work with. Pain and sorrow mix with joy and triumph. Yet these young people are committed to telling their stories to help guide other foster youth, advocate for a better system, combat stereotypes, raise funds so more foster youth can be helped, and to encourage more volunteers. I am so moved by their bravery and resilience, and so proud of each and every one of them. I watch them move through terrible experiences no person -- much less a child -- should go through, and transform into more confident bright stars.

The story reflects the future I want to create:  through the power of storytelling to break down barriers, remove stereotypes, heal wounds, and make strangers friends. To create a future where we experience greater peace between people, full of respect, tolerance, love and helping each other is one worth putting all my passion towards. That is the future I am committed to; that is the future Just Story It works towards. Working together we can make that happen."


Businesses definitely need to get their game on and move into aspiration. What is your aspiration? What future story can you share? Tell me. The world desperately needs to hear them. 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What is Story Theory? How to Use It to Create Awesome Brand Affinity

Presentation given to University of Chicago Alums re: Story Theory and its Application To Marketing
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's a great piece colleague Jim Signorelli put together about how story theory works better as an approach in branding than giving a list of essential story elements or simple story structures.


Right on Jim! It won't take readers long to go through this SlideShare piece and reap the benefits. Of course I love Doug Lipmans story dynamics chart on slide 18, the Identification Filter (oops Jim, there's a typo here!) on slide 20, and the motive chart on slide 27.


The definition of story beginning on slide 37 is OK and goes beyond what most people produce. I'm biased though. I like what Peggy Van Pelt from Disney and I came up with oh so many moons ago -- "a story is an act of communication providing packets of sensory material and an emotional narrative arc allowing listeners to quickly and easily internalize it, understand it, and create meaning from it."


I like this definition because it focuses not on what a story is, but on what it does. What's the lesson here? There is no 1 right definition. Be aware of the variety of existing story definitions and use the one that fits your objectives at that particular time.


OK -- enough said. Enjoy the insights in Jim's post and keep the light for storytelling well lit and tended!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Tina Stock's curator insight, November 25, 2014 5:56 PM

good reference material AND highlights a big issue - what is your archetype?

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New Research: Brands Are Wasting Time And Money On Social Media

New Research: Brands Are Wasting Time And Money On Social Media | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Stop making Facebook the center of your relationship marketing efforts," says Nate Elliott, VP and principal analyst at Forrester.
Karen Dietz's insight:

The research shared in this article is quite surprising.  The latest data shared from Forrester Research shows that top brands posting on Facebook and Twitter reach only about 2% of their audience. Engagement stats are even worse  -- a mere 0.07% of followers actually interact with posts.


Yikes!


And what does this have to do with business storytelling? Well, one thing it might be pointing to is that if you want to share and gather stories from audiences, social media might be the wrong place. Forrester concludes that the best way to engage  customers and prospects is through email.


We already know that blog posts, email and email newsletters allow for better storytelling  and are still very popular. You have more space, and can craft better stories. Social media posts are more like conversations, where stories may or may not show up. But  as we know, stories create higher engagement if you tap into the dynamic of story sharing (that means equal activity on both story listening and storytelling).


As we get more sophisticated in business storytelling, part of that maturity may be learning the best mediums for storytelling instead of thinking that every medium will work.


The recommendation about email makes sense to me. So you might want to read this article, understand a bit more about the research and recommendations, and go make adjustments accordingly.


What do you think about what this research says, and what will you be doing differently? Inquiring minds want to know ...


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Bonnie Sandy's curator insight, November 25, 2014 2:27 PM

Communicating on social media is now everybody's busienss maybe they'll listen to Forrester research... 

Moya Sayer-Jones's curator insight, November 27, 2014 5:36 PM

And maybe we could step into an even more traditional space than email to gather stories .....and actually talk to people. Now there's a novel idea! Hah!

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Tech Soup's 2014 Nonprofit Storytelling Winners

Tech Soup's 2014 Nonprofit Storytelling Winners | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Watch the winning videos in TechSoup's contest.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1oaQDwz


Here's your second article today on nonprofit storytelling.


Oh how I wish every nonprofit could receive solid training in storytelling. If they did, the quality of these videos would skyrocket and lots more good could be done in the world.


But frankly, if you scour the web for corporate storytelling videos, you get the same results TechSoup experiences.


Most of the "stories" shared here are not stories. Some are simply old--school promos.


The "Hope House" video is disguised as a story but is still collection of thoughts and opinions without real experiences being shared (the essence of storytelling). I do like it -- it's just not really a story.


The clip from Sodo Christian Hospital is a good story but it stops short at the end. The closing could have been stronger, with maybe a soft call to action included.


The video that is the best story is the one "Free Running in Baltimore". I want to know more about the organization, however.


What are the take-aways here? Watch each video and pass it through this tried-and-true litmus test: would you spend money to watch this story in a movie theater? Would you buy this story as a book in a bookstore? If you answer yes, then it's a story. If you answer no, then it's back to the drawing board.


Figure out what else you like or don't like and adapt your storytelling as needed. You'll be glad you did!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Simon Mcalen's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:04 AM

add your insight...

 10
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Want Results? Go For These Monsters of Influence + Storytelling

Amazing monsters of influence have a distinct set of qualities. This presentation showcases the skills you can expect to find in influential monsters. Don't be…
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://www.slideshare.net/barryjfeldman/monsters-of-influence-40606982 


Happy Halloween everyone! Just for fun, I found this timely SlideShare that identifies all the essential qualities for being influential.


Oh, and BTW -- they are also the qualities of fabulous storytelling.


Want to change the world? Then keep this list handy. And each quality is framed as a "Monster" for the holiday -- as in "these are monsters to embrace, because they will bring you results in monster proportions". And that's a good thing :))


Have fun!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Storytelling Neuroscience -- Rethinking Training + Online Courses

Storytelling Neuroscience -- Rethinking Training + Online Courses | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
How can the neuroscience of storytelling help you create online courses?
Karen Dietz's insight:

This article by Ahmed Mori of SchoolKeep is written for educators but applies to anyone in business doing training or delivering online courses. There are great points made here about:

  • your brain on stories
  • tips to take advantage of storytelling
  • and a few cautionary thoughts


Here is what I like about the post:

  1. There is a clear research example given confirming that storytelling process both sensory parts of the brain while concurrently stimulating language processing areas.
  2. That stories do more than inform or entertain -- they stimulate critical thinking skills, capture non-linear situation complexities, and construct new knowledge.
  3. There is such a thing as bad storytelling.
  4. That the "storytelling" of marketing is a misnomer


The only point I take exception to is a quote by author Christian Salmon of Storytelling: Bewitching the Modern Mind, who says that "stories are moving away from being spontaneous cultural practices to methods of manipulation citing examples like George W. Bush, Steve Jobs,..." 


Oh please. Manipulation with stories has been going on for 100,000 years. Think the Crusades, the European witch hunts, the Holocaust, etc. But also think of Winston Churchill, Gandhi, and Christ. That's why we need to get really smart about storytelling -- both as storytellers and listeners.


And storytelling remains just as spontaneous as it ever was, thank you very much!


OK -- off to my accountant's office. While I'm gone, go read this really good article and I'll post my next article + review tomorrow.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Give Awesome Presentations With These 5 Storytelling Tips

Give Awesome Presentations With These 5 Storytelling Tips | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Get your audience's attention and keep them engaged with these tips on public speaking.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1wCLi0E 


Here is what I like about this article: the concrete examples of stuff most people say in a presentation that doesn't work, and then rewrites to show how to storify that statement, or share a story instead.


Delivering great presentations takes lots of practice and delivering occasional duds. Yet if you follow the advice here in this article, you can nail it every single time. (**Secret: the same tips apply to creating awesome blogs)


I really like the example of how to turn a statistic into a story. After incorporating these tips, I hope all your presentations are award-winning!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, October 28, 2014 4:38 AM

OK, OK, one more about the presentations... it would be one plus more than needed if this presentation-business were not so difficult (allegedly it's one of the greatest fear to speak publicly - I can attest this...:-)))... So, it is a short one and a good one...:-))) 

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Corporate Storytelling: Want Results? Be Story Brave

Corporate Storytelling: Want Results? Be Story Brave | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Corporate Storytelling: Coming To Your Emotional Rescue - 10/03/2014
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1s3010r 


Here's a quick post with a very important message: most corporate storytelling is lackluster because companies and leaders want to play it safe. They want rosy stories that don't rock the boat. 


But that's the antithesis of great storytelling -- and it won't get you the ROI you seek. As the amazing performance storyteller Elizabeth Ellis says, the best storytelling is about "comforting the afflicted and afflicting the comforted".


Effective business storytelling takes courage, and this article gives us a good dose. As Lou Hoffman, CEO of the PR firm The Hoffman Agency says, "Be story brave. Story is worth fighting for."


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Business Storytelling 101: A 7-Step Refresher

Business Storytelling 101: A 7-Step Refresher | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Seven strategies for making people care about your message.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: 

http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/10/a-refresh-on-storytelling-101/


I haven't curated an article in a while about the necessary core story elements needed for effective business storytelling. So when I ran across this one by JD Schramm, I thought it would be a good refresher -- just like the title says.


All of the elements/qualities Schramm mentions are solid. I want to particularly point out the first piece of advice he gives -- never say, "I'd like to tell you a story about...." Instead, just drop us into the action/experience of the story.


Why? Well first, because it's not needed and wastes time. Second, because it can often set up unconscious barriers to the story ("Aww, just give me the facts; don't bother with the story") before you even begin. Now who wants to do that?!


Enjoy this refresher -- you'll either be able to check off the boxes and pat yourself on the back, or easily figure out where to beef up your storytelling for better results.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Why is Empathy the Key to Good Storytelling? The Answers...

Why is Empathy the Key to Good Storytelling? The Answers... | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
In this guest post, the filmmakers of the forthcoming feature documentary, "My Country, No More" explain the importance of empathy in the storytelling process.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article link: 

http://www.indiewire.com/article/heres-why-empathy-is-the-key-to-good-storytelling-20140730?__scoop_post=cad53970-47e2-11e4-cc37-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=145582#__scoop_post=cad53970-47e2-11e4-cc37-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=145582


Here is a short post packed with great material. What is one of the main reasons a really good story works so well? Because it builds empathy.


But what is empathy? It's often easy to get empathy confused with sympathy. But the two are not the same.


Read this post to learn why empathy is so fundamental to good storytelling and insights into how to bring this into your business storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Story Structures For Fab Presentations: 8 Classics Many Miss

Story Structures For Fab Presentations: 8 Classics Many Miss | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
A good public speaker takes their audience on a journey, leaving them feeling inspired and motivated. But structuring your speech to get your ideas across and keep your audience engaged all the way through is tricky.

Via Bookmarking Librarian
Karen Dietz's insight:

OK -- this is one of the better articles I have found to date on different story structures that you can use when sharing your business stories. 


I love love love that the author tells when and why to use each structure. The information is a gold mine.


I also like that it includes structures not typically discussed -- yet are common and powerful.


Then the author, Ffion (no full name listed -- what a shame)  knocks it out of the park by giving us video examples to watch for each structure. Yeah!


Well, I wish I could give Ffion an acknowledging tweet -- but without a name or contact links I'm lost. Let this be a lesson to all bloggers....


That said, go read the article. It's a gem!

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Javier Arana's curator insight, January 10, 9:26 PM

Muy buen artículo sobre 8 técnicas de storytellin para atrapar a una audiencia.

Debra Walker's curator insight, January 20, 3:38 PM

These techniques are not just great for structuring presentations but are very helpful with a lot of writing projects as well.

 

Emerging World's curator insight, March 10, 4:12 AM

The art of telling compelling stories that move people is at the heart of leadership.  I have heard it said that telling the right stories at the right time is they key to being successful in a leadership role.


These frameworks and the associated resources are a useful tool for anyone who wants to understand what kinds of stories to tell and when.

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Storytelling Your Way to More Business

Storytelling Your Way to More Business | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Learning — or relearning — how to tell stories requires some skill. And consultants and researchers are lining up to teach it, often for a hefty fee.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Hot off the presses from the New York Times is this article about how powerful the need for storytelling has become. Many thanks to Rich Sheridan, CEO of Menlo Innovations, for sending me the link.


Here's what I found interesting: the money people are charging and paying for business storytelling workshops. Gotta love those numbers!


So Entrepreneur Magazine called storytelling the biggest lesson in 2014. I wonder what storytelling will bring in 2015? 


Share your thoughts with me on Twitter @kdietz or post a comment below.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Miguel A. de Jesus's curator insight, December 12, 2014 7:44 PM

One of the ways to communicate and develop your EI is through effective Story  Telling.

J. Steven Sprenger ✔'s curator insight, December 13, 2014 6:13 AM

Corporate Visions trail blazed this concept back in 2003. Very cool and actionable insight.

Jim Signorelli's curator insight, December 15, 2014 8:05 PM

Thanks Karen.

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Failure Stories Have Never Been More Popular

Failure Stories Have Never Been More Popular | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
With Fuck Up Nights and other storytelling venues, people are sharing stories of business disaster like never before.
Karen Dietz's insight:

One of the most uncomfortable stories for anyone to share are failure stories. You know -- the time when you really screwed up.


When jobs and careers depend on us putting our best foot forward it seems counter-intuitive to share big mistakes we've made.


Yet people are so hungry for authentic relationships we want to both hear, and share, our failure stories. It makes us human, validates that even when we make mistakes we are still worthy of belonging. And these stories teach us that yes, we can recover.


They are also a terrific antidote for the cascade of sugar-coated 'success' stories we are continually bombarded with.


This article is all about failure stories and how they've even spawned live storytelling evenings -- called "F-Up Nights" like the Moth. Fabulous! Read about how this got started, where events are, and insights about sharing these kinds of stories.


All of this will make you more comfortable sharing your own. Right on!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Can You Instill Hope Via Stories? If Not You'll Fail Miserably As A Leader

Can You Instill Hope Via Stories? If Not You'll Fail Miserably As A Leader | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
You may think you're an effective leader, but if you're crushing hope in your organization, you'll fail.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This post is all about leadership and storytelling -- specifically, the ability to be hopeful, and instill that hope in others. And how do leaders instill hope? The way it's been done for 100's of 1000's of years: through effective storytelling.


This article is an interview with Libby Gill who is on a mission to bring hope, and "hope theory" back into the workplace, and a front-and-center activity for leaders.


A business axiom these days is "hope is not a strategy". I say that holds true only when the context is about not taking action. At any other time, hope definitely IS a strategy, and one of the most important activities of a leader. Crafting stories with messages of hope is critical for success.


I like the etymology of hope that Gill provides. I'll add a bit to it. Before the 12th Century, hope meant "trust; reliance". Good words to ponder.


Gill shares a lot about hope theory, research into hope, and the dynamics of hope in the workplace. She distinguishes hope from positive thinking, and gives us tangible steps to take -- and some to avoid -- to instill this emotion in others.


It's time to get our hope mojo on. Read the article -- you'll be glad you did.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, December 3, 2014 3:03 PM

Good one, Karen Dietz, and thanks for your overview

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Want Engagement? Quit Advertising To Employees; Do Storytelling Instead

Want Engagement? Quit Advertising To Employees; Do Storytelling Instead | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Selling to employees results in employees feeling like they’re being sold, which over time can foster disengagement, distrust and detachment.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Amen brother! That's what I said when I read this article by colleague Bill Baker @StorytellerBill. 


Corporations, communications folks, managers and leaders have got to stop talking "at" people, or on just "telling" stories. That is all just pushing messages to people -- which Bill says is simply another ad to put up with. And we wonder why employee engagement is so low!


As I encourage my clients, think of story sharing instead and story listening as the secret to turning this situation around.


Bill give us very concrete advice on what to avoid doing, and 3 pieces of solid advice what to do instead. Yeah!


Follow Bill's advice and you will start seeing a huge difference. Thanks Bill!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, November 27, 2014 2:07 AM

Organizations need to stop pushing information onto employees, instead they should be pulling them into the ideas.0


"This approach requires more faith, trust and relinquishment of control, but it results in internal communications infused with greater humanity, which in turn generates greater understanding, conviction and a profound sense of belonging among employees."

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How To Answer "What do you guys do?" Storytelling For Startups

How To Answer "What do you guys do?" Storytelling For Startups | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
In my recent talk on founder storytelling for international business school students at Stanford, a woman named Beatriz asked about the best way to answer a very basic question she receives all the
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://linkd.in/10AQdVk 


This is the #1 story application people have the most difficulty with, hands down. When asked "What do you do?" the need for a story becomes acute, especially at networking events.


Yet the fall-back position is to describe our work (boring!) -- just like the veterinarian did in this article. But as the author of this post, Andrew Raskin says, that's the last thing you want to do.


You want to share a quick story instead. Raskin's advice and the story he tells about this predicament is right on. As is his example of the solution he shares.


Why else would you want to share a story? Because every time someone asks, "What do you do?" it is an opportunity to create a connection, engage in meaningful conversation, and generate a relationship. Relationships build business. 


Run, don't walk to read this post. Get this skill tucked into your belt and go forth to make your mark in the world.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Why Don’t Orgs Do Storytelling? 3 Reasons

Why Don’t Orgs Do Storytelling? 3 Reasons | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
There are 3 common reasons why nonprofits don't do storytelling. Here are my solutions to these problems.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1DSMteK


It's 'nonprofit Monday' because I'm curating 3 inter-related articles on nonprofit storytelling. But the articles apply to any organization. I've experienced all of what is shared in these posts in both the for-profit and nonprofit world.


This first post lists the 3 reasons why orgs don't do storytelling, and offers 3 solutions to get the job done. I'm adding additional solutions based on my org story work in the trenches:

  1. The first piece of advice I have nothing more to add to: "Creating a culture of storytelling requires training, coaching and professional development for everyone involved in the organization..." Take a look at Tech Soup's storytelling winners to see why this is so critical. I've curated their post also for today. Without solid storytelling training any organization is going to produce lackluster results, and won't achieve their desired goals. What a waste of time and money. Don't let this happen to you -- get training.
  2. Don't ignore people's stories if keeping their identities confidential is critical. Change the names, change the faces, change a few details (yes, that's allowed in this case) -- and make a big deal about why you are doing so, because that's part of the story. People will love you for your transparency.
  3. One of the reasons people might not want to share their stories is because the stories are viewed as big pity parties. In other words, the stories are not deliberately evoked nor crafted with respect and clear boundaries in mind. How to evoke stories is not understood. Ergo -- back to point #1: get well trained in the dynamics of storytelling along with techniques in how to harvest, mine, craft, and embody stories.


OK -- there are really good points made here in this article that deserve reading, even though it was posted a few months ago. Tackle these 3 reasons that are stopping your storytelling so you can get on with making a difference in your business or nonprofit. Then check out the other 2 articles I'm curating today for more insights.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Good Storytelling--Why Your Brain Loves It

Good Storytelling--Why Your Brain Loves It | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Studying the neuroscience of compelling communication.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1tj3Kea 


Here is an Harvard Business Review (HBR) article from researcher Paul Zak with more information about the neuroscience behind why stories work so well.


Zak explains the latest they have found in their brain research on storytelling. It's good stuff! And we now know more about what stories produce in the brain.


LOL -- we've known storytelling works because it's been around for 100,000 years. Now science can tell us why. And now when I work with clients I often have to start with the science of storytelling so people will accept that storytelling works. This just goes to prove Zak's point that we always want to know the "why" before taking action!


Enjoy reading about the latest insights on the neuroscience of storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling

Why Any Leader Should Embrace Story Listening Before Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
“What I’ve seen is a leader doesn’t start with storytelling, they start with story listening.” -John Maeda, Design Partner, KPCB During the past two years, B2C as well as B2B marketing leader…
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1yFRJRQ 


B2B companies must engage in storytelling to enhance their growth, says author Tony Zambito. That's not new news to us -- and in fact, applies to all businesses.


But what I particularly like about this article is how Zambito focuses on developing the skill of story listening in order to make that B2B growth happen. And Zambito should know -- he's an expert in creating buyer personas -- a critical storytelling step for marketers.


The author shares a video from John Maeda who does a fabulous job talking about how story listening always comes first for leaders -- of any kind, in any industry -- and then links this practice with design thinking, human-centered marketing, empathy, and vision.


Since 2001 I've been training my leadership clients first in story listening and it's made all the difference. I love how Maeda has put it all together in such a succinct and engaging way.


Enjoy this article along with the video. The author did a great job putting together the material. You'll be glad you watched it and gathered the wisdom from this post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Zeb WATURUOCHA, PhD's curator insight, October 31, 2014 1:00 AM

It is true that if you don't listen to me, I will not listen to you though I might pretend to be listening because you are my boss.

Raymond Godding's curator insight, October 31, 2014 4:01 PM

Leiders die beweging tot stand willen brengen, beginnen met luisteren voordat ze gaan vertellen. 

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How GE Wins Big With B2B Corporate Storytelling

How GE Wins Big With B2B Corporate Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
“Behind every person, behind every company, behind everything, is a story of how it got there – and the most relevant stories connect on a personal level.” Beth Comstock, CMO of GE. The above c…
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1yZ5TQW 


Ahhhhh -- here's an article that is music to my ears!


It's all about how GE is working with the principles of storytelling to provide buyers more than just information about product specifications. GE is deliberately working with stories to create the human connection with each other that we all desire.


How do they do that? This article, written by Tony Zambito for the Business2Community blog explains a lot about their approach. Like spending lots of time on listening first. Yeah!! That is a foundational skill for storytelling and a key commitment for GE.


There are 4 other story principles GE follows. I love "learn imagination". Another thing I like about this article is that there is not a distinction made between corporate storytelling and brand storytelling -- they are viewed as one and the same here, not discrete activities. Thank heavens.


Read more about how GE approaches its storytelling. You too can use the same principles with the same great results.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Clayton Bye's curator insight, October 23, 2014 10:10 AM

More and more businesses are hiring writers to create stories about their products or to create stories for their customers, whether that be for a product or for a company blog or web page..

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Why Do We Make Audiences Sit In The Dark When Telling Stories?

Why Do We Make Audiences Sit In The Dark When Telling Stories? | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Stage lighting is bad for the speaker and the audience.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/nickmorgan/2014/10/09/why-do-we-make-audiences-sit-in-the-dark/


OK -- great question! Why DO we make audiences sit in the dark when we are sharing our stories???


Here's a secret from the story performance world -- rarely do professional storytellers tell stories to a dark auditorium. We most often ask for the house lights to be turned up so we can see the audience.


Why? Because storytelling is a co-created experience involving deep listening with the audience so you can connect with them and make slight shifts in the story to fit the moment. And that can't happen when you can't see the audience.


As the author Nick Morgan says in this post -- let's stop having audiences sit in the dark. Turn up the lights! It will make for better storytelling.


Read the article for several more concrete and practical reasons for keeping the lights on :))


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Critical Tips for Social Change and Storytelling

Critical Tips for Social Change and Storytelling | Just Story It! Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
By Julia Sick (United States) Storytelling is an artistic form of expression—a tool we use to convey a moment or experience in a meaningful way. We use stories in our lives every day, yet less ofte...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's the link:

http://togetherindignity.wordpress.com/2014/10/01/storytelling-for-social-change/?__scoop_post=5bbba890-4994-11e4-9093-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=145582#__scoop_post=5bbba890-4994-11e4-9093-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=145582


This article makes a very important point for any nonprofit, but also for any business. As the author states, "Too often we edit our stories to fit a version of the world that is easier to digest. This does nothing for our progress toward a better understanding of humanity, but instead reinforces unexplained and unquestioned stereotypes." 


Oh, that is so true! When we sanitize our stories, we run the risk of reinforcing stereotypes instead of expressing the rich tapestry of human experience. And often by reinforcing stereotypes we reduce the people in our stories to simple caricatures that are easy to dismiss.


This post by talks in depth about ways to not get stuck in this type of storytelling. Following the advice here is critical for any business or nonprofit if authenticity is important to you.


It becomes even more critical if your business or nonprofit is all about social change. Go read this now...it's a rich and thoughtful piece that's not long.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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