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If Content Is King, Then Storytelling Is Queen: 18 Checkpoints To Consider

If Content Is King, Then Storytelling Is Queen: 18 Checkpoints To Consider | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
In my previous post, I touched on content marketing and I  emphasized throughout the post the importance of quality content. But what does that mean?


What a great post about using stories to build quality content -- and a fun poll to take at the end too!


I love how the author has organized her thoughts and given us really good tips on using storytelling to build great blogs, articles, websites, ebooks, etc. Her tips are a terrific map.


And then you get to take a quick poll at the end and see immediate results.  I'm bookmarking the post so I can keep going back and to see how people are responding!

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Shirley Williams (XeeMe.com/ShirleyWilliams)'s comment, November 27, 2011 11:13 AM
Thank you Karen!
Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Growing executive's impact, influence and income through the power of business storytelling                  www.juststoryit.com  619-235-0052
Curated by Karen Dietz

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About The Just Story It Curation

About The Just Story It Curation | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business.


And visit my website for more information about my speaking, writing, coaching, consulting, and workshops at www.juststoryit.com 

Karen Dietz's insight:

Editorial Statement For This Collection:

Thank you for visiting this curation of articles on business storytelling. I've chosen them because they actually make a contribution to our knowledge and wisdom about stories, show us how to apply stories to growing our businesses, or give valuable how-to tips.


I weed out all the junk. And besides, who needs another post in why storytelling is important?? Where's the beef?? We want the meat!


Based on my 25+ years of biz story experience, (plus a PhD in Folklore) I've written reviews of each article to share what I like best, what you can get from reading the article, or what may be missing in the article.

 

How To Find A Topic: Click on the Filter icon above (look for the 'funnel' shape), and view the tags. Select one that interests you, or type in a keyword in the search box. All the articles with that tag or keyword will appear.

 

I may occasionally review an article that I think is problematic as a way to educate us all, although most I will simply pass over. If you wonder if I've seen an article that is not included here, send me a message and I'll respond.


How To Suggest An Article: If you find an article you think I'll be interested in, click the 'Suggest' button above, past the URL of the article, and I will receive it. Or write me a comment with the URL by clicking on 'Reactions' at the bottom of any article. You will see where can post a comment, which I will also receive.

I trust you find many great insights and tips here. Many thanks for visiting and enjoy the articles!


And I hope you will also visit my website for more tips and tools, & take the free Story IQ assessment so you can see how well developed your storytelling skills and knowledge is: http://juststoryit.com/story-IQ.htm


Karen Dietz

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, October 10, 11:56 AM

Curation within curation... clever...:-)))

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Giving Thank$: A Moving Money $tory

Giving Thank$: A Moving Money $tory | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Do you live in a bubble? Perhaps you live in a community where financial success is pretty much assumed. Where no one talks about money or hardship. Perhaps they even look at money as a symbol of their success. It's a bubble. Meet Sam, who lived in that bubble, but never let [...]
Karen Dietz's insight:

I was shopping yesterday for a dining room table cover and an orange for the cranberry sauce that I forgot earlier in the week. All in preparation for our special Thanksgiving dinner tomorrow with family. 


But of course, every story was playing Christmas music, hawking Christmas decorations, and urging us to buy buy buy. We are swamped with holiday catalogs plus ads for Black Friday and Cyber Monday.


But the consumerism and materialism can be overwhelming and sometimes it's hard to focus on what's really important.


So instead of curating a piece about some new holiday ad that tells a story so we will buy that product, I've been searching for something different that connects us again to this season of gratitude.


And I found it! Enjoy the story in this post that helps us reframe money, materialism, and the experience of everyday grace.


I am so grateful for all of my wonderful, thoughtful, creative, curious, and fun-loving readers. Thank you for all of your input, comments, questions, ideas, stories, and sharing. You all rock.


I wish everyone a happy Thanksgiving season and let's keep telling great stories :)

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, November 27, 11:46 AM

Here's something nice for the holiday season, courtesy of business storyteller Karen Dietz.  Sometimes, we can rise above our circumstances, even when "we have it all."  A good read. Enjoy!  Aloha, Russ.

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Want Engagement? Quit Advertising To Employees; Do Storytelling Instead

Want Engagement? Quit Advertising To Employees; Do Storytelling Instead | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Selling to employees results in employees feeling like they’re being sold, which over time can foster disengagement, distrust and detachment.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Amen brother! That's what I said when I read this article by colleague Bill Baker @StorytellerBill. 


Corporations, communications folks, managers and leaders have got to stop talking "at" people, or on just "telling" stories. That is all just pushing messages to people -- which Bill says is simply another ad to put up with. And we wonder why employee engagement is so low!


As I encourage my clients, think of story sharing instead and story listening as the secret to turning this situation around.


Bill give us very concrete advice on what to avoid doing, and 3 pieces of solid advice what to do instead. Yeah!


Follow Bill's advice and you will start seeing a huge difference. Thanks Bill!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, November 27, 2:07 AM

Organizations need to stop pushing information onto employees, instead they should be pulling them into the ideas.0


"This approach requires more faith, trust and relinquishment of control, but it results in internal communications infused with greater humanity, which in turn generates greater understanding, conviction and a profound sense of belonging among employees."

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New Research: Brands Are Wasting Time And Money On Social Media

New Research: Brands Are Wasting Time And Money On Social Media | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Stop making Facebook the center of your relationship marketing efforts," says Nate Elliott, VP and principal analyst at Forrester.
Karen Dietz's insight:

The research shared in this article is quite surprising.  The latest data shared from Forrester Research shows that top brands posting on Facebook and Twitter reach only about 2% of their audience. Engagement stats are even worse  -- a mere 0.07% of followers actually interact with posts.


Yikes!


And what does this have to do with business storytelling? Well, one thing it might be pointing to is that if you want to share and gather stories from audiences, social media might be the wrong place. Forrester concludes that the best way to engage  customers and prospects is through email.


We already know that blog posts, email and email newsletters allow for better storytelling  and are still very popular. You have more space, and can craft better stories. Social media posts are more like conversations, where stories may or may not show up. But  as we know, stories create higher engagement if you tap into the dynamic of story sharing (that means equal activity on both story listening and storytelling).


As we get more sophisticated in business storytelling, part of that maturity may be learning the best mediums for storytelling instead of thinking that every medium will work.


The recommendation about email makes sense to me. So you might want to read this article, understand a bit more about the research and recommendations, and go make adjustments accordingly.


What do you think about what this research says, and what will you be doing differently? Inquiring minds want to know ...


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Bonnie Sandy's curator insight, November 25, 2:27 PM

Communicating on social media is now everybody's busienss maybe they'll listen to Forrester research... 

Moya Sayer-Jones's curator insight, November 27, 5:36 PM

And maybe we could step into an even more traditional space than email to gather stories .....and actually talk to people. Now there's a novel idea! Hah!

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Data Storytelling: A Fab Technique For Presentations

We often hear that a presentation needs a good story. But the tricky part is to get your story to be clear and concise. So how can you avoid beating around the…
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://slidesha.re/1zAfVpn 


Got data? Want it to be memorable, sharable, and inspire action? Then grab this how-to guide for sharing a research report as a story.


I really like what the author has done here. This is a SlideShare with only 18 slides. But the example shared works perfectly. After viewing this piece you will definitely be able to storify any data you need to share.


Story on!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Djebar Hammouche's curator insight, November 19, 2:15 AM
Data Storytelling: A Fab Technique For Presentations
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Creating Irresistible Serial Stories: Mastering The Content Jungle

Creating Irresistible Serial Stories: Mastering The Content Jungle | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Learn how to turn readers into buyers with an engaging, audience-first storytelling strategy. Demian Farnworth reveals the creative technique in six steps.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1uzR4lq 


Whether you are a small business owner creating blog posts, a corporate content creator, a leader giving lots of presentations, or a nonprofit seeking to share its stories with the world, we all face the same problem: -- how to generate enough stories.


The folks at CopyBlogger wrote this piece for all of us in that predicament. Their focus is blogging, of course, But the principles, tips, and advice laid out here applies to all of the situations above.


The fundamental idea shared here is how to create a serialized story. If you read this post you will learn about:

  1. experiencing content shock
  2. creating empathy maps
  3. doing the right kind of research
  4. how to storyboard
  5. finding the hook
  6. repurposing your serialized story


And it's all in one nice and tidy place. Yeah!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Infographic -- The Science of Storytelling Visually Explained

Infographic -- The Science of Storytelling Visually Explained | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1wyWdqD 


Here is a quick of infographic about why storytelling works. It's perfect for a Friday when were trying to finish up the week and had out of the office for the weekend.


I also like that this piece is geared towards marketing and marketers. Just last night over drinks with a few women executives, a high powered agency account manager was lamenting how many of her clients just don't get the importance of storytelling. I'm sending her the link to this infographic today. Maybe this will help make a difference!


Use these statistics whenever you need to, or share this piece to make your point about how powerful storytelling is.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


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Art Jones's curator insight, November 16, 10:13 AM

Finding this information in infographic format makes lots of good info available to us in one place.

Audrey's curator insight, November 19, 3:03 PM

Storytelling is very helpful in education.  Students can make up their own stories in most subjects  to enhance learning.  Why? It involves emotions, critical thinking and evaluation.  

 

Have a look at www.hotmoodle.com 

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Storytelling Builds Empathy: Airbnb Tells Emotional Reunification Story

Storytelling Builds Empathy: Airbnb Tells Emotional Reunification Story | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Airbnb launched a beautifully animated commercial video that tells the true story of two former border guards who were reunited through the lodging website. The ad tells the story of Jorg and Kai who were reunited after Jorg’s daughter booked him a trip [...]
Karen Dietz's insight:

I agree with everything colleague Omar Kattan says in this blog post, particularly his ending statement about empathy and business results.


And I applaud AirBnB (I am a loyal customer) for going after stories. I love the graphics of the video, too.


But I am going to point out a few areas for improvement for the story. Why? Because I want all companies to excel in crafting/sharing stories. Yet what I experience most often is just OK. That means $$ and opportunities are left on the table.


My comments are not about AirBnB -- but about most of the business stories I see around the web these days.


So let's take a teaching moment here. These are 4  ways this story could be waaaaayyyy better with some basic story crafting skills:

  1. Give names to characters. Research shows again and again that nameless faceless characters don't create empathy in the listener. Audiences have a harder time connecting to stories when names are absent. Give us names here of the guards -- Jorge and Kai -- and the daughter.
  2. Why does the former guard carry a piece of the wall with him??? Why is this a barrier for him in life? What trauma happened?? Is the main character's experience psychological or does he actually physically carry a piece of the wall around with him? I can guess, but it's hard to know. What we are given are concepts/platitudes, not a concrete motivation that moves the story along. This is a classic storytelling mistake. The story would have been much better if we had known something like, "Even after the wall came down, Jorg just couldn't let go of the depressing horrors he'd seen of people trying to escape the East or be reunited with loved ones after decades of isolation." That's too wordy, but you get the idea.
  3. There's a huge part of the story missing: how did the daughter actually find Kai?  How was the problem of finding Kai solved? Inquiring minds want to know. And how does AirBnB fit in? There's some real storytelling meat here that we never get.
  4. And finally, why was Jorg different after meeting Kai? Was it friendship and forgiveness that healed Jorg? Or something else? And what was life like afterwards? A big transformation happened that the audience missed out on because no details are provided.


Adding these pieces would only have taken another minute or so. Don't leave home without named characters, motivation, problem resolution steps, and more details about the transformation.


Thanks for listening and go craft awesome stories!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What's the Difference? Scripted vs. Improv Storytelling

What's the Difference? Scripted vs. Improv Storytelling | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

TBinKC asked, How much of your storytelling is planned and scripted, vs. improvised in the moment based on how the audience responds? Is there a process of writing or improvising and then 'locking down' a story?

Karen Dietz's insight:

Storytelling colleague (and wonderful storyteller) Laura Packer wrote this piece and it is great. She tackles the question about whether to memorize your story, or do it more improv style.


I get this question all the time, and I really like how Packer explains the difference -- and why improve storytelling is the best skill to develop.


Storytelling is a craft, and this article partly explains why. Even after all these years I still take storytelling workshops to keep my skills honed, and learn more.


Thanks Laura for writing and sharing this piece!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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John Capecci's curator insight, November 10, 8:56 AM

Here's what pro storytellers know about the jazz-like approach to improvisational communication.

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6-Word Storytelling Challenge: Not Sure You’re Doing This Right

6-Word Storytelling Challenge: Not Sure You’re Doing This Right | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

I recently came across an online article inviting a group of business storytellers to take up the Hemingway 6-word challenge — that is to write their own story in only six words. [When he was challenged to do so, Hemingway famously responded: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.”]

Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1E95HNe 


My story colleague Paul Smith, who wrote the fab book "Lead With A Story" for leaders, is coming out with his new book "Parenting With A Story" Nov. 12th. You can read more about it here: http://amzn.to/1ti7sBu 


In this post Smith tackles the challenge of creating a 6-word story ala Ernest Hemingway. When you are trying to write a story -- I mean a real story -- for social media (i.e. 140 characters), mastering this skill is critical. And darn hard.


You can see how we all fumble with this in the post Paul writes, and the examples folks share. Lots of comments and opinions abound -- but no story.


Here's my attempt at a 6-word story: Played golf. Boss won. Kept job.


Here it is as a 127 character Twitter post: From my window in Palm Springs, golfers whack the balls. Who will win as they swagger through the greens? Ahh, the boss prevails again and jobs are kept.


Read what others did and submit your own. Have fun with this. And remember, constraints are essential to creativity!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Marianne Hart's curator insight, November 7, 10:44 AM

Twitter has helped with my verbosity.

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Complexity of Great Ideas Conveyed Through Storytelling

Complexity of Great Ideas Conveyed Through Storytelling | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Many moons ago, in middle school, I was sitting in one of the middle rows, in my white shorts and pristine white half sleeve shirt, watching my English teacher write a word on the blackboard
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://linkd.in/1skjw67 


I am always on the hunt for articles that are great examples of stories in action. In this case, LinkedIn connection Karthik Rajan of GDF SUEZ wrote this piece and it really shows how stories can be used effectively to convey complex ideas simply.


Another reason I like this post is that the stories Rajan shares also have more than one idea imbedded in them, and hence contain multiple meanings. Which idea and meaning you will emphasize depends on the situation and your intention as the teller.


In addition to the points Rajan makes, what other ideas and meanings do you find embedded in the stories he shares?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Amazing Storytelling Competition: Fairy Tales Architecture 2015

Amazing Storytelling Competition: Fairy Tales Architecture 2015 | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

After scanning through dozens of banal articles about business storytelling (yawn), this article pops up on my radar screen and I rejoice. Wow! A cool new adventure in storytelling with architecture and design.


Even better -- it's a competition open to any and all creatives (biz storytellers, that's you!). The goal is to dream about inventive architecture and reflect your creative ideas in a story that's attached/connected to a visual rendering.


Check out the websites listed and download the free PDF of submission info by following the link to "blankspaceproject". This could be a lot of fun. And you could win a cash prize!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Job Action Day 2014: Storytelling Resources for Career Success

Job Action Day 2014: Storytelling Resources for Career Success | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Job Action Day 2014, Nov. 3: Quintessential Careers and experts offer advice to job-seekers for using storytelling for career, job-search success.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://www.jobactionday.com/2014-Job-Action-Day.html 


What an awesome list of links to resources for job seekers to tell their story and snag that position!


Yesterday (Nov. 3rd) was Job Action Day, empowering workers and job seekers during transitions.


There are fabulous storytelling articles here that anyone can use to help their career or land their next job.


Keep this handy and use it. Tell your story well to stand out from the crowd and differentiate yourself in the marketplace.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Art Jones's curator insight, November 4, 6:18 PM

There are 30+ articles produced by thought leaders that focus on using storytelling formula to ignite your job search and get you hired.


This article enables one stop shopping for finding great storytelling ideas for job seekers or anyone working on optimizing their ability to create and share their professional brand story.

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Play W/ This Infographic: How Every Kind Of TV Show Goes

Play W/ This Infographic: How Every Kind Of TV Show Goes | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
"Anatomy of Shows" is a fairly accurate representation of the formulas behind almost every kind of TV program. Maybe go write your own?
Karen Dietz's insight:

OK -- now for the fun stuff this holiday weekend!


If you are going to be gorging on TV this weekend, here's a fun game to play: use this infographic to see if the show follows the plot described. I bet it does :) Or maybe you'll discover a new variation to share with us.


I love a good TV show, although for most their predictability don't keep me interested. 


But for those days when I just need to veg and any old TV show will do, I keep can keep boredom at bay by comparing what I'm watching with this chart. You can too.


Have fun y'all!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, November 27, 11:43 AM

Thanks to business storyteller Karen Dietz for this fascinating game. With this guide, you'll figure out the formulas supporting most television programs on the air this season.  Good fun.  Aloha, Russ.

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What is Story Theory? How to Use It to Create Awesome Brand Affinity

Presentation given to University of Chicago Alums re: Story Theory and its Application To Marketing
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's a great piece colleague Jim Signorelli put together about how story theory works better as an approach in branding than giving a list of essential story elements or simple story structures.


Right on Jim! It won't take readers long to go through this SlideShare piece and reap the benefits. Of course I love Doug Lipmans story dynamics chart on slide 18, the Identification Filter (oops Jim, there's a typo here!) on slide 20, and the motive chart on slide 27.


The definition of story beginning on slide 37 is OK and goes beyond what most people produce. I'm biased though. I like what Peggy Van Pelt from Disney and I came up with oh so many moons ago -- "a story is an act of communication providing packets of sensory material and an emotional narrative arc allowing listeners to quickly and easily internalize it, understand it, and create meaning from it."


I like this definition because it focuses not on what a story is, but on what it does. What's the lesson here? There is no 1 right definition. Be aware of the variety of existing story definitions and use the one that fits your objectives at that particular time.


OK -- enough said. Enjoy the insights in Jim's post and keep the light for storytelling well lit and tended!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Tina Stock's curator insight, November 25, 5:56 PM

good reference material AND highlights a big issue - what is your archetype?

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Doing A Business Pitch? What Makes A Killer Story For Branson + Top Investors

Doing A Business Pitch? What Makes A Killer Story For Branson + Top Investors | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Entrepreneurs don't have to be pitch perfect, but passion, projection of strengths and awesome products are essential
Karen Dietz's insight:

Are you making a business pitch (i.e. telling your story) to potential investors anytime soon? Well, there's tons of advice out there for you and some advice on the structure of one feel more like plans for building a spaceship.


Ay yi yi. Which is why I like this article. The basic advice given is: follow the KISS principle (keep it simple sweetie) and make sure your story has this short-list of essential elements.


To keep you focused and delivering the right material investors are seeking, follow Branson's and other top investor's specific -- and not complicated -- tips given here. 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Time To Get With It: How Inside-Out Marketing is 21st Century Marketing

Time To Get With It: How Inside-Out Marketing is 21st Century Marketing | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Inside-out marketing reframes marketing theory as we know it.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1uceeJp 


Here's a terrific article by colleague Jim Signorelli, author of StoryBranding 2.0, that sets old-school marketing on its head, and brings us all into the 21st Century.


What is inside-out marketing? It's the opposite of "Let's push our messages out there." 


Learn more about this total reframe for marketing. Let's get with the program that guards against failure by leveraging authenticity and passion.


Don't leave home without inside-out marketing, and don't leave home without a story.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, November 20, 11:12 AM

To understand the power of story telling please read this article.  There is some great insights here. Thanks to Karen for sharing it initially.

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The Power of Story Over The Brain: Content Creation Know-How

The Power of Story Over The Brain: Content Creation Know-How | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
The experiential nature of content creation through storytelling enables you to communicate your brand narrative.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1yNeuTx 


Here's another short but powerful article on the effects of storytelling on the brain. Yes, I said "storytelling" not just stories -- because this article is all about what happens when stories are shared between people, like in real time conversations.


Like: the significance of neural coupling, what mirror neurons produce, how dopamine cements memories, and my favorite -- how stories activate brain regions that are dormant when processing facts. Yahoo!


This article is chock full of fab info that you won't want to miss. It's short and to the point, too. Enjoy.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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corneja's curator insight, November 17, 6:52 PM

"According to a research conducted by anthropologist Robin Dunbar, personal stories account for 65 percent of our conversations." I suppose that many topics really may be considered as personal stories, but we are not aware of it. This an interesting point of view.

Marco Favero's curator insight, November 18, 8:29 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

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Got Story? It's The Most Important Thing You'll Do For Your Biz

Got Story? It's The Most Important Thing You'll Do For Your Biz | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Start selling stories, not products or solutions, and you'll connect to your consumer on a deeper level.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1EELXl2 


This post has some really great points about the importance of storytelling for business. And the author makes some other points about the neuroscience of storytelling that are not as well recognized -- like improved social skills and learning how to be in situations that haven't happened yet. Or that listeners to stories become more open to new ideas.


The author then links all of the information about storytelling to how this generates more business for any company.  Yeah!


A few simple rules are then shared to keep in mind when telling stories. The only one I caution against is the last one--make sure your stories have a happy ending. I'd substitute that with "make sure your stories have a resolution". If we think of endings in that way, we won't get stuck in always creating ' happy ever after' all the time and will actually have all kinds of different endings available to you along with more creativity. 


The video about how Coco Chanel got started --  a founding or origin story -- is good up to a certain point. After a while the transition phrase "once upon a time" becomes annoying. I almost stopped listening. The story is also conveyed as a series of events that sort of creates a story. The combination of the two makes for an okay story, but not one that's really awesome. What a shame.


So grab these insights, watch the video, and ask yourself how you would better tell the Coco Chanel story. There are lots of lessons here.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Want Better Biz Stories? 11 Questions Biz Stories Can Answer For Deeper Connections

Here is a short video showing 11 fundamental human questions stories must answer for better business storytelling. If you can craft your stories to connect w...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaC9aA7hH6A&rel=0 


I had a fun time creating this 1.5 minute video on PowToon Monday  (instead of curating, LOL) and updated it today (Wed.). It's based on a talk I gave at Disney a few years ago -- 11 fundamental questions stories help answer. The video is tiny to watch here. so click on the headline above to watch it in more comfort.


We humans come to our lives with these core questions, many of which we are continually driven to search answers for. 

 

If we can keep in mind these questions as we craft our business stories, we will have a much better chance of creating deeper connections with our customers and staff.

 

After watching the video, think of the origin stories of your company. Think about the stories you have about best ways to be, how to interact with each other, roles in the community, and the cycles of creation and destruction. There are tons of experiences and lessons here to explore and share. Because answering these questions as best we can help any person and organization navigate through life.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Bart van Maanen's curator insight, November 13, 8:29 AM

Door deze serie vragen te beantwoorden, kun je je bedrijfsverhaal beter vertellen en ook relevant houden, volgens Karin Dietz, een specialist in business storytelling. En ook een tip om een verhaal te presenteren met een PowToon animatie. ;-) 

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B2B Sales and Storytelling: 3 Insights For Why It Works So Well

B2B Sales and Storytelling: 3 Insights For Why It Works So Well | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Imagine if your salespeople could shine a light of insight on today’s empowered customers so that they no longer underestimate the cost of the status quo and the benefits of change.
Karen Dietz's insight:

When I comes to the powerful connection between B2B sales and stories, I don't know how it could get any plainer than this post.


Colleague Michael Harris, who specializes in sales through story, clearly explains why stories turn to gold during the sales cycle. And he shares stats to back him up! Gotta love that.


What I also like about how Harris writes about story and sales, is that he never comes from the very simplistic and short-sighted transactional position of "Let me tell you a story and you will buy my product." If it were that easy, we'd all be rolling in piles of money.


Instead, Michael talks about how stories provide insights, and there is a specific place in the sales cycle for stories. Trot out a story too soon, and it falls on deaf ears. Share a story too late, and the customer is already shoving you out the door.


Then there's the whole story crafting thing. Lousy story, lousy results.


But I wax on. Go read Harris' 3 points about story and sales, grab his graphic to get his points visually, and then hang out with his blog and other goodies to get your stories ship-shape for sales situations. Oh yeah, and enjoy the $$ you'll see in return if you make the investment in stories :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Art Jones's curator insight, November 11, 10:50 PM

Excerpt:

"If salespeople want to sell value, 70% of executive buyers said that the best way for salespeople to provide differentiation that they trust is by sharing customer stories."

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"Storytellers," Innovation Officers, + Drunk Social Media Managers Get The Onion Treatment!

"Storytellers," Innovation Officers, + Drunk Social Media Managers Get The Onion Treatment! | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
It's just crazy enough to sound real.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1tA2IfM 


It's Friday and time for a good laugh. Recently Advertising Insider poked fun at its industry by putting together this slick tough-in-cheek video.


Yes, I love the poke at "storytellers"! It wouldn't be funny if it weren't so true :)


Happy Friday and enjoy the weekend.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Momentum Factor's curator insight, November 7, 11:45 AM

In social media, it helps to have thick skin, and a great sense of humor! 

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How To Answer "What do you guys do?" Storytelling For Startups

How To Answer "What do you guys do?" Storytelling For Startups | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
In my recent talk on founder storytelling for international business school students at Stanford, a woman named Beatriz asked about the best way to answer a very basic question she receives all the
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://linkd.in/10AQdVk 


This is the #1 story application people have the most difficulty with, hands down. When asked "What do you do?" the need for a story becomes acute, especially at networking events.


Yet the fall-back position is to describe our work (boring!) -- just like the veterinarian did in this article. But as the author of this post, Andrew Raskin says, that's the last thing you want to do.


You want to share a quick story instead. Raskin's advice and the story he tells about this predicament is right on. As is his example of the solution he shares.


Why else would you want to share a story? Because every time someone asks, "What do you do?" it is an opportunity to create a connection, engage in meaningful conversation, and generate a relationship. Relationships build business. 


Run, don't walk to read this post. Get this skill tucked into your belt and go forth to make your mark in the world.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Track Your Customer's Stories: VideoGenie Becomes Storybox

Track Your Customer's Stories: VideoGenie Becomes Storybox | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
If there’s one thing that is absolutely true about the Internet, it’s that there are a whole lot of people on it. Pretty much everyone, actually. Within that massive subset, there are a whole lot of people using just about every product under the sun. Not only are they using them, they are tweeting
Karen Dietz's insight:

Is this creepy? Is it just marketing hype or a cool tool? Is it big data run amok? Or is 'story' now the most popular word to use when marketing products? I am really not too sure what to think about this latest development.


This article is about VideoGenie, which has transformed itself into Storybox. What's that? Storybox tracks a company's customers and their interactions with that brand from all over the web, aggregates the data, and sends it back to the company who signed up for the service.


Storybox not only provides aggregated data, but it analyzes the data for 'usefulness' and how 'on message' the company's content is. This could be a very valuable tool. As they say, " Everyday, customers use their voices, pictures, videos, and words to share their experiences with products and services, creating the most trustworthy, shareable, and memorable way to learn about a brand." They wrap this all up and call it a story. 


Sigh. Well sort of, and sort of not.

Level 1: We know that people share ideas, thoughts, opinions, and sometimes anecdotes on the web. A lot of this is conversation, not stories. Yet it is all called storytelling. Marketing guru Gerald Zaltman has shown how much quicker and cheaper it is to gather stories (real stories) from a small group of customers for far better insights.


Level 2: On another level, I doubt that the data provided will have a plot, relatable characters, or a story arcIt could though -- because we know that all data has a story to tell. The kicker is that it takes a human to interpret the data meaningfully and then present the information as a story -- complete with a plot, characters, and story arc. Information delivered that way is memorable, meaningful, and can inspire action.


I predict that eventually the word 'story' is going to end up on the annual list of jargon words to avoid.


But then again, story is a much cooler word to use than 'interaction', 'conversation', or 'engagement'.


I can see the day coming -- I'll put my headphones on to listen to my MusicStory collection, I'll sip my cup of StoryTea, while storying (instead of working) on my iStory (computer). When that day happens, see me screaming and running for the hills :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Dominique Taste's comment, November 6, 7:02 AM
Thank you for your brilliant insight. I totally agree with you about misuse of terms like story or storytelling.
Karen Dietz's comment, November 6, 4:09 PM
Thank you Dominique for your comment! Glad I am not alone :) Have a great weekend coming up.
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Tips For HR Storytelling: Effecitvely Responding To The EEOC

Tips For HR Storytelling: Effecitvely Responding To The EEOC | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article LinK: http://bit.ly/1zuFmvc 


A colleague here in San Diego, CJ Westrick of HR Jungle (providing HR expertise to companies) sent me this piece to share with you.


I like it so much that I agreed to curate it. Why do I like it? Well for one, because it speaks to the value of storytelling in HR, particularly around compliance issues. Who knew?!


And there are great lessons in writing business reports for all of us in this piece. Such as:


  1. Convey your story in 3 sections: (1) about your policies; (2) the progression of the story with only the relevant facts and details of your story that are not overstated; (3) an application section that shares why the company took action
  2. Keep the legal (and business) jargon to a minimum. Share a story/relay the experience instead. In this case, the EEOC is looking to understand what happened. Avoid complexity and technical language.
  3. Keep the information and story to a minimum. Make sure there's a clear theme and it's readable. 
  4. Use descriptive sub-heads. There's a good example of how to do this in the article.


In other words, focus focus focus your report. For specific HR recommendations when responding to EEOC requests, read the post because they are right on.


This is another solid application of storytelling in the business world, and it just goes to show that the reach of storytelling goes far beyond marketing/branding, advertising, and PR.


How do you want to apply the advice in this article to your own company?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Why Don’t Orgs Do Storytelling? 3 Reasons

Why Don’t Orgs Do Storytelling? 3 Reasons | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
There are 3 common reasons why nonprofits don't do storytelling. Here are my solutions to these problems.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1DSMteK


It's 'nonprofit Monday' because I'm curating 3 inter-related articles on nonprofit storytelling. But the articles apply to any organization. I've experienced all of what is shared in these posts in both the for-profit and nonprofit world.


This first post lists the 3 reasons why orgs don't do storytelling, and offers 3 solutions to get the job done. I'm adding additional solutions based on my org story work in the trenches:

  1. The first piece of advice I have nothing more to add to: "Creating a culture of storytelling requires training, coaching and professional development for everyone involved in the organization..." Take a look at Tech Soup's storytelling winners to see why this is so critical. I've curated their post also for today. Without solid storytelling training any organization is going to produce lackluster results, and won't achieve their desired goals. What a waste of time and money. Don't let this happen to you -- get training.
  2. Don't ignore people's stories if keeping their identities confidential is critical. Change the names, change the faces, change a few details (yes, that's allowed in this case) -- and make a big deal about why you are doing so, because that's part of the story. People will love you for your transparency.
  3. One of the reasons people might not want to share their stories is because the stories are viewed as big pity parties. In other words, the stories are not deliberately evoked nor crafted with respect and clear boundaries in mind. How to evoke stories is not understood. Ergo -- back to point #1: get well trained in the dynamics of storytelling along with techniques in how to harvest, mine, craft, and embody stories.


OK -- there are really good points made here in this article that deserve reading, even though it was posted a few months ago. Tackle these 3 reasons that are stopping your storytelling so you can get on with making a difference in your business or nonprofit. Then check out the other 2 articles I'm curating today for more insights.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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