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Just Story It Biz Storytelling
Story as a path to transformative leadership & business success    www.juststoryit.com  619-235-0052
Curated by Karen Dietz

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About The Just Story It (TM) Curation

About  The Just Story It (TM) Curation | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business.

I've chosen them because they actually make a contribution to our knowledge and wisdom about stories, show us how to apply stories to growing our businesses, or give valuable how-to tips.


I weed out all the junk. And besides, who needs another post in why storytelling is important?? Where's the beef?? We want the meat!


Based on my 25+ years of biz story experience, (plus a PhD in Folklore) I've written reviews of each article to share what I like best, what you can get from reading the article, or what may be missing in the article.

 

How To Find A Topic: Click on the Filter tab above, and type in a keyword. All the articles with that keyword will appear.

 

I may occasionally review an article that I think is problematic as a way to educate us all, although most I will simply pass over. If you wonder if I've seen an article that is not included here, send me a message and I'll respond.

I hope you find many great insights and tips here. Many thanks for visiting and enjoy the articles!

 

And I hope you will also visit my website for more tips and tools, & take the free Story IQ assessment so you can see how well developed your storytelling skills and knowledge is: http://www.proprofs.com/quiz-school/story.php?title=storytelling-skills-ni-part- 

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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 7, 2013 5:15 AM

Karen is dedicated to the art of Storytelling as a key tool in running a business or any other type of endeavor.  Here at ManufacturingStories.com we fully support this art form as the best way to generate positive and effective change.  Thanks Karen for all of your dedicated and tireless work! It's a tood Story!!

Thorsten Strauss's comment, September 9, 2013 5:15 AM
Hello Karen. "Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business." Please scoop a new link to these articles. The link you put in the comments only points at your scoop page. Or was the message that your scoop page IS the collection of the great articles? A bit unclear. (PS: I suggested a scoop for you today)
Karen Dietz's comment, September 11, 2013 5:52 PM
Hi Thorsten -- the link needs fixing and I'm trying to do get that done. Thanks for your patience. The link should actually be to the entire curation. This post is a permanent post that acts as a kind of editorial page. The idea is when people want to direct others to the entire collection, they can scoop/re-scoop this page which should lead people to the site. Thanks for the comment and I'll work on clearing up any confusion! And many thanks for the suggestion, which I thought was fabulous.
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Burning Man: Its Wonderful, Weird Economy and Links to Story

Burning Man: Its Wonderful, Weird Economy and Links to Story | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Burners spend thousands preparing for the money-free event. But just as the desert community cannot fully escape capitalism, neither can capitalism remain untouched by the "gift economy."
Karen Dietz's insight:

Burning Man is happening right now and it's on my bucket list to go to there. Why? Well for one, think of all the awesome stories I'll be able to tell afterward!


But that is not the only reason. I want to go to Burning Man so I can experience/learn more about the ethos and logos of community, values in action, and how the future may look/feel through different economic values that I see emerging today. 


Burning Man is a week-long art event that happens in a totally desolate desert with sandstorms and no water. You pack in all you need. And you pack out everything you generate.


What has this event got to do with storytelling though? Because what I see in Burning Man are the basic tenets of storytelling. Not how to tell a good story. But what principles underpin great storytelling.


Here are the basic principles of Burning Man and the link to storytelling:

  1. Make real connections with people instead of only commercial connections. What counts is connection at the event, not commodity. The highest leverage point in biz storytelling is making connections that keep people devoted to your product/service over time. Not "I tell you a story; you buy my product" short term transactions.
  2. Create something for the collective reward. We swap meaningful stories ultimately to share our wisdom, knowledge, lessons, inspirations which elevate all of us together. This is often what drives the best of the best storytellers.
  3. Invest in a product/service/org for the joy it will bring you and other people. Invest because it is beautiful, not ONLY because a profit exists (think Steve Jobs & Apple). We share stories because of the joy and beauty they bring to ourselves and others, not ONLY because of profits to realize.
  4. Giving and gifting is the culture of Burning Man. The best storytelling emerges when you think of your story as a gift you offer others. In both cases you are feeding souls, not stomachs.
  5. At Burning Man people create awe inspiring art to share. People dream, convene, create, and make. Storytelling is a creative act that also harnesses this same power in the same way. Crafting a story is not a plot or story structure you cram yourself into.
  6. Burning Man can help folks shift, change, and reset back in daily life. Stories can do the exact same thing.
  7. Burning Man is able to not lose its authenticity as it grows bigger. I want to learn that so stories don't lose their authenticity as audiences and connections grow bigger.


Now back to the article -- this is a fascinating story about Burning Man and the values they focus on. It's a terrific example of values in action and how values shape culture. There are good lessons here for all of us in leadership, living values, and org storytelling.


This is a great read to enjoy. Maybe next year I'll get there!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Need a Headline For Your Story or Blog? 19 Fab Formulas

Many people have found headlines that work wonders, consistently, time after time. And they go well beyond the saturated listicle or clickbait. Why not take so…
Karen Dietz's insight:

I just led a storytelling workshop today for one of my favorite nonprofits -- Just in Time for Foster Youth. Part of our discussion was how to start a story that captives folks. Eventually we have to write a "wow" headline for the story to be shared in a newsletter, etc.


When using a written story in an email, newsletter, blog post, article, PowerPoint, and the like, being able to write an attention grabbing headline is key. Your headline will spark someone to read your story. Or not.


Here's a nifty guide to help you nail writing headlines that move people to stop, read, and gain your wonderful insights.


Have fun with these formulas and let me know how they work for you!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Answer These 3 Questions For Fab Success At Your Next Storied Presentation

Answer These 3 Questions For Fab Success At Your Next Storied Presentation | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Delivering presentations is one of the best ways to build your brand and increase your network, yet public speaking is ranked ahead of death in the list of fears. To succeed at your next speech, focus on your audience and ask yourself these three critical questions.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Every presentation you give -- no matter what time and to whom -- is all about being able to tell your story and succeed.


To help us all get better at presentations of any kind -- whether it's at a team meeting, with senior executives, project managers, investors, sales proposals and presentations -- here are 3 critical questions you need to answer to be able to tell your story well and sell.


While the article is geared toward public speaking, the advice here crosses all applications. Whenever you need to present your ideas, make sure you can answer these 3 questions first.


Follow the tips here and be awesome!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Art Jones's curator insight, August 26, 9:11 AM

Remember, your presentation is not a showcase for how knowledgeable and great you are. Your presentation is your opportunity to share ideas with your audience that position them to be more & do more.

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Story Skills Are Critical for All Rungs of Org Ladder

Story Skills Are Critical for All Rungs of Org Ladder | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago we were asked to analyze a competency model that had been created by a client. The assumption of their model was that as leaders move up to higher levels in the organization, some competencies become more important. For example, in their model they proposed that a [...]
Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here is a study showing how influence and motivation skills are necessary for both managers and leaders. This is unique because instead of just focusing on leader skills, this study surveyed senior executives, middle-managers, and lower level managers.


You'd think that the skills would differ as you go up the org food chain. Not so! As you can see from the chart, motivation, influence, communication skills and authenticity are critical at all levels.


How does this connect with storytelling? Because the way to realize "inspiring and motivating others", "display high integrity and honesty", "communicates powerfully and prolifically", "builds relationships", and the like is being able to listen for and share compelling stories that move people to action.


There are several more key insights this article shares. 332,860 bosses, peers, and subordinates participated in this study by Zenger/Folkman. Wow! Anyone in charge of people needs to get their storytelling game on in order to survive and thrive in today's business climate. This applies to nonprofits, entrepreneurs, and solopreneurs also. 


For the solopreneurs, it's taking these skills and applying it to marketing and sales to grow you business. For nonprofits it's taking these skills to build donations, staff and volunteer commitment, and building communities.


Bottom line: keep building those story skills to reach your dreams.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Crappy Biz Storytelling: Scoopit Links W/out Insights

Crappy Biz Storytelling: Scoopit Links W/out Insights | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it

8.21.14
With 1,387 views, more than 2x the next closest Scoop, The debate about Scoop.it links on Twitter is the most viewed and shared Curation Revolution Scoop of all time.

Dr. V

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator @Robin Good . Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

Added to G+ too
https://plus.google.com/102639884404823294558/posts/TUsNtsAsjWp

 




Via Martin (Marty) Smith
Karen Dietz's insight:

FYI Folks -- I trust that the reviews I write about the articles I curate help people along in their business storytelling journey. I know that there are many curators out there who do not add reviews/comments to the articles they highlight. 


As a result, Scoop.it and other curation sites are getting a backlash because audience members are tired of getting a link to an article that brings them to Scoop.it, and then requires another click to get to the article. Now I know that is annoying. And there is nothing of value offered between clicks.


Marty's response to the original blog post is right on. Read it along with all the other comments. Truly illuminating.


Other than a rant for me, what's the value of this post to you and business storytelling?


Namely this -- no matter what medium you use -- blogging, curating, digital storytelling -- make sure you are actually adding value for your audience. Expand their knowledge, give them tools, show them how, and offer your excellent insights. The stories you share have to connect to your audience in these ways. Anything else is a waste.


All of these posts and reviews add up to telling your story in a big picture way. So thanks Marty for addressing this issue, and reminding us about principles for quality curation. I've learned a lot from both you and Robin!


Karen Dietz

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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 21, 10:11 AM

add your insight...


Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 11:07 AM
Right on Marty! I'm re-scooping this as a way to help that learning along about how to really use Scoop.it well and leverage it.
Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 11:07 AM
Right on Marty! I'm re-scooping this as a way to help that learning along about how to really use Scoop.it well and leverage it.
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Look up, Connect and Share A Story--video

My daughter shared this emotionally powerful video with me, and it made me reflect on how we as salespeople waste so much time in sales cycles, because we're...
Karen Dietz's insight:

The other night my husband Tim and I were out to dinner. At the table next to us was a teenage boy with his mom and dad. The kid was totally engaged in his meal and having a good time gobbling up the food. No phone or iPad for him!


His parents though? They spent the entire meal on their phones checking email and texting. They never once said a word to their son. You could tell the boy was used to it and was entertaining himself in their absence. Tim and I just shook our heads.


If ever there was a strong case for putting down the phone and connecting with others -- and swapping stories back and forth -- it's this video. I loved it and it really got me thinking. I think you will enjoy it too. It's a great reminder to stop, talk, and share stories.


It's OK if I'm not tethered to my cell. When work is done I can ignore it and my iPad to share the story of my day with my husband -- and listen to his in return :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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“Talk the Walk”: A Game Changer The Best Storied Leaders Do

“Talk the Walk”: A Game Changer The Best Storied Leaders Do | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Why words matter.
Karen Dietz's insight:

I like this article because it goes beyond the simple leadership phrase "Walk the talk," which means "live your values, don't just talk about them".


What the author Bill Taylor is focusing on here is the connection between thinking, language, communication, and action. His position is that when leaders start thinking differently, their language changes, then their communication changes, and then if all goes well, their words and actions line up.


In other words, if leaders can break out of the "isms" of their company, they will start thinking differently about the organization and talk about it differently, too. That can be a game-changer for everyone. Want more innovation? Then start thinking about it differently. That starts the cascade to language, communication, and action.


Taylor has good examples to share, and then asks: "So ask yourself, as you try to lead an organization, or a business unit, or a department: Have you developed a vocabulary of competition that helps everyone understand what makes your company or team special and what it takes for them to be at their best? Can you explain, in a language all your own, what separates you from the pack and why you expect to win?"


All of this languaging and communication happens best through storytelling--which then shapes and inspires action of done well.


While this article is all about using shaping and shifting language internally, the next piece of work is making sure it also connects with customers so you don't end up becoming extinct.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What Do Leaders Of The Future Need To Be? Courageous + Authentic Storytellers

What Do Leaders Of The Future Need To Be? Courageous + Authentic Storytellers | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
It is often said of business school academics that they are adept at describing – through their case studies and the articles and books they write – business as it is – or was – at a certain time. The problem, of course, is that their audiences have to contend [...]
Karen Dietz's insight:

Leadership is not easy and certainly not for the faint of heart. It takes guts and courage. Why? Because being authentic takes guts and courage. And leadership is not easy because of the multiple stakeholders, followers, and power brokers with competing agendas that leaders get to dance with.


I like the points made in this article -- that authentic storytelling is critical for a leader's effectiveness. And that it also can help in connecting and working with different audiences while becoming a force for good in the world.


The author being interviewed in this post shares some terrific insights into what authentic storytelling is all about -- along with making the case for how leadership needs to radically change today.


No matter where you are in your career, or the organization you are a part of, the advice here will serve you.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Selena Prior's curator insight, August 21, 7:44 PM

This is a really compelling article that challenged me to reflect on the challenges of leadership.

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 22, 12:25 AM

It's a very intersting topic and mostly I undersign it... though it's culture-dependent too... the context, the connotation you might have by reading e.g. this title... that  might  count too...  coming from a region where story-telling might be a substitute of lots of things, among other things, lying, or - as one of my cross-cultural researcher friend said once - saying "no", I have some reserves... but even in the Anerican culture, whether the executives of Enron e.g. weren't (surely not authentic but) excellent story-tellers? If you are with me on that... 

 

Of course, the message goes better into the deep with emotions and what is better than the story-telling like emotion-vehicle? of course... but to say that the future leader's main characteristics are courage and story-telling capacity is, I don't know, IMHO, not only simplistic but simply not enough...

 

Starting by the main point what story he/she should so well and authentically tell? What the content is of this famous story? I would start here when drawing this profile... and yes the sellability, the motivation-power, the capacity of  being able to attract the followers, to be able to align their energy are also important but somehow the content of all these has a certain priority in my mind...

S'Marie Young, CPCC's curator insight, August 22, 12:00 PM

This article highlights some of the qualities successful leaders of the present and future must cultivate, such as courage, resiliency, permeability and transparency. These qualities create a powerful presence, one that people can trust.


Presence is knowing yourself, your values, passions and goals, and being able to communicate them authentically. Presence is also being empathetic to the aspirations of others.

 

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Charity, Empathy, And Storytelling: The Mechanics of Generosity

Charity, Empathy, And Storytelling: The Mechanics of Generosity | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Two weeks ago, the annual Giving USA report showed that American philanthropy continues to climb out of the trough of the Great Recession, one of the real lagging indicators of the economy. And while U.S. philanthropy has been roughly static at two percent of GDP for a couple of generations [...]
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's a great read on how storytelling can open wallets if done well. The recent non-profit study talked about here discovered that people will be more generous when making donations when respect for a person/group is present.


In other words, if your stories depict others as helpless, hopeless, and victims, donations are less. If your stories depict others as active participants in their own well-being, donations increase. This is significant.


And this lesson translates across all business sectors. Any organization will have better traction with its storytelling if the stories are respectful, generate respect, and have a meaningful resolution.


The study also chats about the difficulty of creating an effective pipeline of stories in an organization that can be shared. Well -- any organization, non-profit and for profit, has this issue.


The advice I agree with? Get your staff as close to the end user as possible -- that's where you will find a wealth of stories.


Enjoy this article and the insights it shares that you can immediately apply to your business.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Killer User Onboarding For Products Is All About Stories

Killer User Onboarding For Products Is All About Stories | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Want more people to adopt your product? Make sure you know what progress looks like in your user’s life, not just on their screen.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This article comes from the land of software adoption -- you know -- buying a program or app and then learning how to use it.


Some companies really suck at these instructions or "onboarding" as they say in the tech world. Some are great at it. I'm sure we've all wanted to tear our hair out in frustration when this process does not go well. Yeah, like I'm supposed to read what's in software genius' head so I can use the !$%*&#! product.


So imagine my delight when reading this article about how to use stories to understand what the user (that's me) needs to know and do for a successful software experience. 


But wait! I realized that this post applies to almost ANY business and its products. Hooray -- we can all use the tips, advice, and insights presented here.


I only have one part to nit-pick about -- the section on how to evoke stories from customers. The method they suggest will only get you thoughts and opinions -- NOT STORIES. So use solid story prompts to get the work done: "Tell me about the time when..." "Tell me what happened when..." "Tell me about the time you were most frustrated..." "Tell me about the experience that led you to..."


I do agree when the author says to keep digging into the stories to find rock bottom motivations and causes that led a customer to your product.


If you need good reasons and practical steps to dig into your customer's experience to grow your business, then read this. 


And many thanks to colleague Debra Askanase @askdebra for recommending this article to me. Good find Debra!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Tina Stock's curator insight, August 20, 1:14 PM

Some applicable steps for any onboarding/welcome process

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Everything a Savvy Presenter Needs to Know: 30+Tips and Tutorials

Everything a Savvy Presenter Needs to Know: 30+Tips and Tutorials | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
We've been compiling a list of top presentation resources that will help you become a master presenter. Check out the resources below nicely divided into categories of articles, infographics, Quora and videos. There's something for every presenter!

Via Baiba Svenca
Karen Dietz's insight:

Fellow curator @Baiba Svenca found this site and it is fabulous. If you want to up your presentation skills, here are all the tips, tools and advice you need all in one place. And storytelling plays a big role. You will find articles directly speaking to this in the list.


Now there is no excuse for "death by PowerPoint"!  


Thanks Baiba. And many appreciations to this site for the compilation, plus rescuing the rest of the world from soul killing, mind-numbing presentations :))

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wanderingsalsero's curator insight, August 17, 11:19 PM

Back before the digital age it was Dale Carnegie and Toastmasters.  While those are both still very valuable resources, the digital environment adds a slightly different nuance to it.  That's why I think this compilation of resources is valuable.

Barbara Hartzler's curator insight, August 18, 12:23 PM

For future reference. :)

Benjamin Labarthe-Piol's curator insight, August 18, 9:22 PM

Good and exhaustive ressources, many things to look at.

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Computer generated stories? Turns out it's like really, really hard

Computer generated stories? Turns out it's  like really, really hard | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Researchers at Australia's University of New South Wales recently designed the Moral Storytelling System, a computer program that forgoes all the messy human parts of writing a story to bring you undiluted, AI-generated narratives.
However, the Moral Storytelling System, or MOSS, focuses exclusively on fables, because less straightforward storytelling remains still too complex for artificial intelligence. Developer of the ...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Whew! It looks like us business storytellers won't be totally replaced by a computer anytime soon. Dodged that bullet for now.


This is a quick post perfect for a Friday. It talks about the attempts to create a Moral Storytelling System (MOSS) -- and its failures to actually come up with a decent story. 


The program focuses on fables first and a sample is included -- that's quite sorry (yeah!).  Turns out storytelling is quite a complex skill to master. And very difficult for a computer to emulate.


But the vision for storytelling's future shared here gives us pause -- computers will make meaningful contributions to literature within the decade...and the computer will definitely be doing some of the work of writing.


Hmmm -- what do you think?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Free e-book on Openings that Grab Attention

Delivering a brilliant presentation starts with your introduction. The first 60 seconds of your talk set the tone for the rest of your presentation. This eBook…
Karen Dietz's insight:

How do you create a great opening for a presentation? Here's a quick guide sharing techniques that will capture your audience's attention and get your speech off to a terrific start.


Keep this handy and have fun experimenting with different openings. Story on!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Developing Your Storytelling Strategy: 4 Essential Questions

Developing Your Storytelling Strategy: 4 Essential Questions | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Ask yourself what you want to achieve, who can help you, how you can reach your audience, and what appeals to them.
Karen Dietz's insight:

I like this post by Paul VanDeCarr because it makes some really good points about why you would even want to tell a particular business story.


To truly harness the power of storytelling, it's best to have a well-thought out plan and strategy before you get too far down the road.


This article poses 4 questions to help you determine your strategy. And the example used is a good one. Even better is a "Smart Chart" tool to download to help you create your story communication strategy. We always like free tools!


I hope this post proves helpful to you and enjoy the rest of the week.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Advocacy, Change and Narrative: How Stories Can Create Impact

Advocacy, Change and Narrative: How Stories Can Create Impact | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

This article is not written for most mainstream businesses -- yet is has a powerful message about the role of stories in battling stereotypes,  opening minds, and creating change. So I think there are direct business applications.


The author shares how storytelling from constituents can have a tremendous positive impact on the public policies related to them. This is the same dynamic companies wrestle with internally with shift attitudes and opinions, and has relevance when working with customers.


If the insights shared here work for combating poverty and other deeply entrenched social problems, they will work for your business.


If you as a leader or entrepreneur have decisions to make affecting others, follow the storytelling lessons here. You will be glad you did.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What causes most videos to miss the mark: a big storytelling problem

What causes most videos to miss the mark: a big storytelling problem | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
When I commissioned a video of the prayer vigil, I got back a bunch of comments about how great the prayer vigil was. Arrgh! That was all wrong.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This post and experience shared here comes from the world of religion. And it's a great story about the problems with most videos organizations produce. Mainly that they are NOT stories!!


I so appreciate the insights author Len Wilson shares with us. And his fix for the problem. 


And here's my particular caution: don't turn your video over to a video team and expect a story. Many of them don't know how to tell a story. Personal experience speaks. Make sure you know the story you want to tell FIRST. Then make sure they do it.


Don't waste your time making worthless videos. Follow Len's advice here and you'll come out way ahead in the business game.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Art Jones's curator insight, August 13, 9:27 AM

Every good story is about a changed life!

Janet Vasil's curator insight, August 14, 5:15 AM
Excellent article about video storytelling. A good producer should start by discussing the story you want to tell - what do you want viewers to think, feel or do from watching your video? What's the overarching message you're trying to convey? Then the discussion should turn to deciding the content of the interviews and the visual components and how they'll support the story you want to tell. Pre-production planning should generally take twice as long as the shoot itself. Just because someone has the technical skills to shoot and edit video does not mean they know how to tell a compelling story with video.
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Robin Williams: 10 Insightful / Inspiring Quotes

10 profound quotes from the late Robin Williams.
Karen Dietz's insight:

It's a sad day learning about the death of Robin Williams. He kept us laughing and was a unique storyteller in his own right.


These quotes of his popped up on SlideShare and I thought you would enjoy them. May Robin's light and humor continue to sustain us for many decades to come.

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, August 13, 7:17 AM

I agree with business consultant Karen Dietz that Robin Williams was a rare talent who had the unique talent of making us laugh at ourselves.  He will be missed.  Aloha, Russ.

Christian Wasinger - theNLPexpert's curator insight, August 13, 11:40 AM

The sudden passing of Robin William's came as a shock to many. He will life on in so many ways, one of which are these 10 quotes.

Randy Bauer's curator insight, August 14, 2:17 PM

Tell a funny story. Share a comic from the paper or the internet. Express yourself with abundant enthusiasm. Try bringing a smile or laughter to someone across from you. It really is the "best medicine.

 

We have all been blessed to laugh with Robin Williams.

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Why patient--and customer--stories get ignored

Why patient--and customer--stories get ignored | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
"Why are you here today?" Some variation of this question kicks off almost every doctor's appointment for most of us. In this post, doctors explain to other doctors how patients often construct dee...
Karen Dietz's insight:

What a great article this is. Truly healthcare is being transformed these days. But what still lags behind is understanding how patient stories are directly connected to quality of care.


In fact I'll say that the same principles and experiences shared in this article are very similar to the fate of customer stories in business.


So let's re-orient our thinking and really leverage the power of stories in patient care and customer relationships. This post by Carolyn Thomas gives lots of data and insights that will help us all.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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malek's curator insight, August 12, 9:22 AM

Health educators should also be good storytellers:

You're probably aware of the symptoms of a heart attack patient. But what about " it was cold in the night when an obese man came from a restaurant after smoking, drinking and having a heavy meal."  

Randy Bauer's curator insight, August 14, 2:51 PM

The Healing Relationship that exists in healthcare is of mutual importance for the Patient and Provider. If there is not mutual respect for listening and paying attention How can either Participant Benefit.

 

As a Provider I can't begin to understand what the Patient desires from there Physical Therapy encounter unless I truly listen with empathetic ears. 

 

Who am I say what will work best for one patient, will certainly work for the next if there is not full engagement.

 

And if I do engage completely will this not maximize compliance and fuel the healing process?

 

I would strongly recommend Heal Thy Self: Lessons on Mindfulness in Medicine, by Saki Santorelli - http://amzn.to/1uytBkV

 

"Within each, the healer and the healed, lies the Wounded and a Powerful Inner Healer. These are the gifts of being born in this world".

 

 

 

 

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Biz Storytelling Rant: Some Truths Most Won't Say

Biz Storytelling Rant: Some Truths Most Won't Say | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
You are not a storyteller - Stefan Sagmeister @ FITC from FITC on Vimeo. I couldn’t help laughing when I saw this rant against misuse of the term ‘storyteller’ on B&T. The media, advertising an...
Karen Dietz's insight:

I watched the short video of Stefan Sagmeister's rant on storytelling and loved its irreverence. Many points brought a big grin to my face.


There are problems, though. By his own definition he probably doesn't qualify as a storyteller -- especially since we don't know if he's received any formal training in storytelling (written or oral). I'm not sure all graphic designers are de facto storytellers.


And then limiting storytellers to only novelists or film makers is another big mistake. But I certainly enjoyed the rest of the points Sagmeister makes!


Then we get to the author of the article Sagmeister is featured in. Journalist Brian Corrigan's viewpoint is that journalists are storytellers. Well, they are a type of storyteller. But the inverse pyramid structure they use is the direct opposite of a compelling story structure.


So what's the bottom line? Go view the video for points that most people won't make but many think. Then read the article about journalism to grab points about why storytelling is here to stay.


In any event -- have fun :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How To Be A Humble Storyteller: 5 Solid Steps

How To Be A Humble Storyteller: 5 Solid Steps | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Humility is as important a trait in speakers as it is in leaders.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Once again Forbes writer Nick Morgan has written an article that is spot on -- about speaking and humbleness.


I can hear you saying "But of course, you want to be humble!" Yeah, well all of my clients struggle with one and Nick's post talks about how to get it done.


It's not that my clients are arrogant. In fact, they are the exact opposite. But they all think that sharing their stories is bragging about themselves. They don't want to be arrogant and fear being perceived that way through their storytelling. So we tackle this right up front and I make many of the same points the author does.


Nick wrote some excellent points to consider. And I like the examples he shares of prominent speakers who were not perceived as narcissistic, egotistical, or conceited even though they are/were larger than life.


There is even some current research shared on humbleness and leadership. This is well worth the read if ever you have anxiety about sharing your stories. 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Hartger Wassink's curator insight, August 10, 3:37 AM

Simpele maar bruikbare tips om een persoonlijk verhaal te houden dat raakt, zonder 'over the top' te gaan

Art Jones's curator insight, August 11, 7:28 AM

Seek to be the Mentor & not the Hero of the story you present!

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What are the top skills every leader needs? Story makes it happen.

What are the top skills every leader needs? Story makes it happen. | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Fail to develop these at your peril.
Karen Dietz's insight:

Here's the latest research on needed leadership skills -- and storytelling is the way to achieve results for #1, 2, 5, 7, 10, 13, 14, and 16.


This covers inspiring and motivating others, displaying integrity/honesty, building relationship, developing others, championing change, connecting the company to the outside world, and practicing self development.


Stories play a role in all of these. Yes, who knew? It's all about knowing what stories to tell when, how to tell them effectively, how to listen for stories, and how to foster both engagement and achieving goals through stories. 


Now stories won't cure everything. But storytelling (and all that involves) is a core competency for leaders.


Enjoy reading all about the research and findings. It's a short article.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Beginning a Presentation: 8 Ways to Hook Your Audience

Beginning a Presentation: 8 Ways to Hook Your Audience | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Karen Dietz's insight:

Now here's a quick and handy resource for you -- 8 ways to grab your audience's attention when starting a presentation.


The beginnings of stories and presentations are not easy. You want to engage folks right away. Beginnings and endings are the places most folks get stuck with their storytelling. The ones presented here will definitely help you.


Now I will say, in conversational business storytelling where folks are swapping stories, simple beginnings are best: "It was 2003...." or "When I was working at..." or "One time when I was a project manager...." These 3 openings are based in time, in a location, or task. Choose one -- it's all you need to get started.


But for presentations we've got to get our game on. That means openings that grab attention.


Read this post and write down these ways to hook your audience -- because they work.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Michael Williams StoryCoaching's curator insight, August 8, 2:23 AM

Another useful set of 8 ways to grab your audience's attention at the beginning of a presentation. Again, story is the important thing. Thanks to Gavin McMahon for this.

Miguel Paul Trijaud Calderón's curator insight, August 8, 4:30 AM

How to start a presentation. 8 Tips from top TED talks.

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The ROI of Storytelling: Measuring Effectiveness

The ROI of Storytelling: Measuring Effectiveness | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
One of the elusive questions that often surfaces in discussions about storytelling is, “How do we know when the story that we’ve told has been ...
Karen Dietz's insight:

Well, this article makes an interesting point: nonprofits and businesses might want to take a strategic and long-haul approach to figuring out the ROI of storytelling.


This big-picture approach to ROI is focused on finding the patterns of results your storytelling generates.


Hmmmm -- I think this is a kernel of a good idea. I do think that looking at patterns of results over time can be very informative. Yet the assumption buried in this notion is that the ROI of storytelling is hard to figure out. I don't think that's the case if you are clear on a few key points:

  1. In both the business and nonprofit world, we want our stories to move people to some sort of action.
  2. Being clear on what result(s) you want to produce early on will help you craft compelling stories that will more likely work to bring you your desires. Case in point: numerous times I've helped nonprofits tell a story for fundraising and saw immediate and significant results (big donations).
  3. Use measures appropriate for storytelling: connection, engagement, loyalty, knowledge transfer, sense of community, story sharing, specific desired action steps, etc.


So think about and craft your ROI to serve both short-term results and long-term patterns. Sacrificing the long-term for the short-term only means you will miss significant information and perhaps surprising unexpected results.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Not a Straight White Man? The Authenticity Story Trap for Workers Like You

Not a Straight White Man? The Authenticity Story Trap for Workers Like You | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
Why being yourself can hold you back.
Karen Dietz's insight:

It seems this is the day for articles on authenticity.


The previous article I just curated says if we want business connections and relationships that move us forward on all fronts, then sharing the ups and downs at work/home (via stories) is the way to go.


But hold on! This article points out a very thorny and critical problem. Women, those of color, and other minorities experience repeatedly being shut out -- and careers derailed -- when they show up authentically. This is all based on new research. 


Woah. Big issue here with lots of communication implications (gender, power, values, etc.). And what does this say about leadership??


What does the author, Sylvia Ann Hewlett, suggest? Recognize the value your difference brings and leverage your unique understanding to help solve problems. Hmmm - surely there's more.


Let's try to narrow this down and connect it to storytelling. Maybe what needs to happen is greater awareness and articulation of specific stories women and minorities need to share at work to move up through the ranks.


What would those stories be and how would they need to be crafted? Share your ideas. I bet we can come up with a few more helpful suggestions.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

 

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Avoid co-worker splits: share the stories of your ups and downs

Avoid co-worker splits: share the stories of your ups and downs | Just Story It Biz Storytelling | Scoop.it
A single honest conversation is better than a hundred trust falls.
Karen Dietz's insight:

This is a short article with a powerful message -- when you can share your ups and downs creates deeper connections between others. We win.


To flip it -- when we only present an idealized version of who we are, it separates us from others. We lose.


Why is this important for business storytelling? Two words:

  1. Authenticity
  2. Fulfillment (career, work, social, etc.)


And of course, you share the ups and downs of your life / work through stories because doing so creates even deeper connections, relationships, and influence.


Now just because I've made this quick summary doesn't mean you've gotten all the great insights and research this post has to offer. So go read it :)


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Curated by Karen Dietz
Karen is available for workshops, coaching, public speaking & consulting on telling your story, making values/vision come alive, uniting people to achieve audacious goals, & building transformative leadership. Remember, whoever tells the best story wins!