Just real interesting
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Just real interesting
A Scoop.it of just interesting things with an obvious fascination with all things historical, social,  cultural and geographical (and just things real interesting!)
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Read my lips: what your voice reveals about you

Read my lips: what your voice reveals about you | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
From gender transition to asylum seeker applications, how you talk can mask or betray your true self.
Via Christopher L. Story
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Thirsty Yet? Eight Cities That Are Improbably Running out of Water

Thirsty Yet? Eight Cities That Are Improbably Running out of Water | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
The amount of rainfall a place gets isn't the only factor in how much water is available to it. These major urban areas show how dire the coming global freshwater shortage could get.
Via Christopher L. Story
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Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything

In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease

Via Seth Dixon, Christopher L. Story
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 3:34 PM

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal on these ships, but they aren't designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.

 

Tags: BangladeshNational Geographic, South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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A history of violence

A history of violence | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
Evidence is growing that gun violence in America is a product of weak gun laws
Via Christopher L. Story
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Flags of Europe Explained

Fifty minutes of flags! All the flags of Europe from the Nordics to the Balkans. All the segments are here, some with some errors fixed. Enjoy Thank you s

Via Dustin Fowler, Christopher L. Story
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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, July 5, 7:30 PM
I admit that I have not watched this in its entirety (or even its majority), but I wanted to share, because I find it fascinating, and I feel like you need to know it's there!  I look forward to watching more of it in the near future! 
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Watch from the air as Rio build its 2016 Summer Olympic sites

Watch from the air as Rio build its 2016 Summer Olympic sites | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
Since Rio de Janeiro won the bid for the 2016 Olympics in 2009, various areas in the city and nationwide in Brazil have been rebuilt to accommodate the venues.

Via geographil, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Christopher L. Story
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The Dramatic Landscape of China's Gansu Province

The Dramatic Landscape of China's Gansu Province | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
Gansu Province, in northwestern China, is about the same size as California, with a population of about 26 million people. Gansu’s diverse landscapes include parts of the Gobi Desert, the Yellow River, numerous mountain formations, and remnants of the Silk Road and the Great Wall of China.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 22, 2015 8:43 AM

This photo gallery is filled with dozens of great teaching images, displaying the dramatic human and physical landscapes of the Gansu Province of China. 


Tagsimageslandscape, China.

Jane Ellingson's curator insight, October 22, 2015 9:03 AM

Cultural Landscape

Tony Hall's curator insight, October 30, 2015 2:34 AM

Some truly amazing images in this collection from The Atlantic.

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The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India

The Ganges River Is Dying Under the Weight of Modern India | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
The country’s future depends on keeping the holy river alive.

Via Seth Dixon
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 7:00 PM

The Ganges River is a place of religion for these people, they see it as a place where they can bathe for the forgiveness of sins and for ancestors alike. The only problem with this really is that it is a very dirty river, sewage and other sorts of waste, germs and disease are running through it. Unfortunately, the people are drinking from this river.  

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:21 AM

The Ganges River is the most populated region in all of India. The river is sacred and is very holy to the people of India. The river is a religious river in which the people residing in the area use it as a symbolization or purification, life, bathing and drinking. The bigger issue for 'purification' is the fact that the river is very polluted and unsanitary. The pollution not only threatens the people because it could be used for drinking but it also affects the thousands of species, for example fish, that are in the river. The fish could be a source of food for the very overpopulated area but instead the very own people of India are damaging the river. One would think that a river so sacred would be protected and cleaned but it fails to meet these standards. Overall, regardless of the pollution, India still uses it for its religious beliefs and still declare it a holy river. 

Sarah Holloway's curator insight, February 16, 6:26 PM

This article touches on very serious religious and environmental issues connected to the Ganges River.  The Ganges is the sacred river of Hinduism and in part because the river valley is the most heavily populated region of India.  Simultaneously, this holy river is an incredibly polluted river as it's the watershed for a industrial region that struggles with significant sanitation problems; this is a great article on the environmental and cultural issues of development.

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Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared

Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
The cancellation of the mandatory long-form census has damaged research in key areas, from how immigrants are doing in the labour market to how the middle class is faring, while making it more difficult for cities to ensure taxpayer dollars are being spent wisely, planners and researchers say.

Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 2, 2015 11:25 PM

Canada got rid of the mandatory census, and is discovering it can no longer know much about itself. 


Tag: Canada, populationcensus.

Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:41 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and Perspectives

This article is about how Canada switched its census from being mandatory to voluntary, and how this has had many negative effects. By not having a mandatory census, Canada has saved the national government money, but in truth has really lost a lot. It is much harder to have accurate demographics for city planning, research purposes, and business marketing. Researchers are unable to tell the distribution of racial equality in neighborhoods, the demographics of neighborhoods, and are completley unable to track immagration. There is a voluntary census in place, but this produces much lower quality results, and is expensive to obtain this data.

 

This relates to the theme of how information such as census data is used, and through this article you are able to tell how important something like the census is to providing data for so many different oraganizations/people. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:45 AM

As much as Americans hate the Census, this article proves that it is an important governmental instrument. There are many in this nation that would probably desire a similar proposal. They should read this article before ever speaking on the subject again. A Census is nessacary  to tell us about ourselves. How can a government formulate a public policy, if it does not know who lives within its borders?

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Sci-Fi Symbol Rooted in Folk Culture

As part of the Yiddish Book Center Wexler Oral History Project, Leonard Nimoy explains the origin of the Vulcan hand signal used by Spock, his character in the “Star Trek” series.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 2, 2015 11:27 AM

Leonard Nimoy was born to Yiddish-speaking Orthodox Jewish immigrants from Iziaslav, Soviet Union in 1931.  His connection to the Jewish people was always very important to him and this is a great example of how folk/religious cultural traits can become part of popular culture. LLAP.

Tori Denney's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:35 PM

folk culture vs. popular culture - Often, practices of folk culture can turn into popular culture and lose it's meaning. The example here begins with Nimoy's Star Trek character, Spock's, hand signal for waving hello. When Nimoy was younger he had seen the Vulcan culture do this hand signal for blessing others in a ceremony of something he wasn't sure of, but knew was very powerful and important. So, this is where Spock's hand signal idea originated. Because of this popular movie, over media, this spread worldwide, turning into everyone practicing this alien greeting. But, no one knew where it came from or even cared to find out that the hand gesture had very sentimental meaning to this folk culture. 

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These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity

These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
Maria says she's black and Lucy says she's white. Together, they prove none of this makes sense.

Via Seth Dixon
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Carlee Allen's curator insight, May 17, 2015 11:35 AM

A news reporter from the UK congratulates one twin for turning out lighter than her sister, who has black skin. The parents of the twins are mix-gendered, (one of them is black and one of them is white), so one of the twins got her looks from her mom and other one got her looks from her dad.

 

 

I found the video very racist! I don't know what the news reporter was thinking at all! But, I think that it is really cool that they are twins, and are different genders.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, May 24, 2015 12:20 PM

The idea that these 2 girls are related just shows that race shouldn't have anything to do with who we are as people. We learned about equality in many units and I am amazed that something like this has even happened. 

Tori Denney's curator insight, May 26, 2015 8:36 PM

Ethnicity - Ethnicity is a socially defined category of people who identify with each other based on common ancestral, social, cultural or national experience. The girls shown in the pictures came from the same mother, and have the same father, but of course they are fraternal twins. Most people would categorize the red headed girl as white, and the brunette as black or African American, both with completely different backgrounds, and it never crossing their minds that these girls could be related at all. Due to society's categorizing of skin color, people have grown to believe wrong about ethnicity. The color of one's skin has nothing to do with a person's family history or heritage. These twins prove that society is racist when it comes to assuming the ethnicity of a person.

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Big increase in surgery to mend ‘flesh tunnel’ earlobes

Big increase in surgery to mend ‘flesh tunnel’ earlobes | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
The price of fashion: £1,800 to rebuild ears stretched by fashion

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:35 PM

What is culturally accepted in some circles and places, might be frowned upon in others.  Some twenty-somethings are realizing that corporate culture can be less forgiving about expressions of individuality than their friends were in high school.  What are some places that demand certain appearances?  How do you feel about these cultural norms and how they are informally enforced?

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Today’s key fact: you are probably wrong about almost everything

Today’s key fact: you are probably wrong about almost everything | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
Most people around the world are pretty bad when it comes to knowing the numbers behind the news. But how issues such as immigration are perceived can shape political opinion and promote misconceptions

Via Seth Dixon
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What’s That You’re Wearing? A Guide to Muslim Veils

What’s That You’re Wearing? A Guide to Muslim Veils | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
Veils for Muslim women come in all sizes, shapes and colors — and with terminology that can mean different things in different places.

Via Allison Anthony, Christopher L. Story
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Dress codes under fire as heels row blows up

Dress codes under fire as heels row blows up | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
A receptionist was sent home from work for refusing to wear high heels this week, prompting an angry response. As Britons dress more casually, should we lose the rules that guide our attire?
Via Christopher L. Story
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‘Now is the best time in history to be alive’

‘Now is the best time in history to be alive’ | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
More food, less war, higher incomes, longer lives: we live in a golden age, according to a growing school of thinkers. Do they have a point, or are they naively blind to today’s problems?
Via Christopher L. Story
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What Happens to the Coins People Toss Into Fountains?

What Happens to the Coins People Toss Into Fountains? | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
An investigation
Via Christopher L. Story
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There are now only 10 countries in the whole world that are fully at peace

There are now only 10 countries in the whole world that are fully at peace | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
The world is becoming a more dangerous place and there are now just 10 countries which can be considered completely free from conflict, according to authors of the 10th annual Global Peace Index.

Via geographil, Christopher L. Story
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Climate Change Is Here

Climate Change Is Here | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
Record heat, fading ice, and rising seas show how climate change is affecting us. But there’s new hope we can cool the planet. Here’s how.

Via Seth Dixon
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Tony Hall's curator insight, October 30, 2015 2:21 AM

This is a very good resource on climate change. Well worth having a look:)

John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:30 AM

This site is great to show evidence of climate change. It has various sites with videos and articles.  The interactive is organized to answer these main questions:

How do we know it’s happening?How do we fix it?How do we live with it?
Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 10:15 AM

There is too much talk about helping the climate and environment. All politicians do is talk about cleaning the environment and having less pollution. Even Al Gore is big talk. I've only heard of little change. I want to see a difference. I want to see people actually doing things to help the environment. Enough talk. What should happen is a world wide clean up. Jobs should be created where people should clean in their own community. Its a simple job. Get a trash bag, get off your lazy butts, get out of the house, get a group together (who would be paid by the state) to pick trash up off the streets, beaches, trails in the woods, baseball fields, parks. This isn't hard to do. Not just one person, but if a group of people can come together and be employed by their state to clean their community, at least four days a week. There should also be a group of people, even fisherman to clean the ocean, go out and get what ever trash you can find. Using nets, and if fish are caught, throw them back in the ocean. Also, Trash Island has to be eliminated. It boggles my mind that who ever passed the law on trash being dumped into the ocean an Okay to do. Are you kidding me?? What is wrong with you? Our Earth is dying because of humanity. Also the oil spill that happened in 2012, I believe, I saw a man on the news that created a way to capture the oil floating on the surface of the ocean with a blanket like material, sure it would take a lot of those "blankets" but at least it would be helping to rid the ocean from oil. What are people thinking?? that the oil will just disappear?? Are you serious? So many people really have to open their minds. Look at what's happening you ignorant selfish fools. I will finish my rant right here.

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The Fastest Growing Economies

The Fastest Growing Economies | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
See how the world's largest and fastest growing economies change over time.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 3, 2015 9:01 AM

This interactive is simple but conveys some very powerful data.  Above is a still shot of 2014's fastest growing economies (you can also view the largest overall economies).  Another telling statistical ranking is the UN's Human Development Index; explore more global data on Google's Public Data


Tags: economic, visualizationstatisticsdevelopment, google.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 6:01 AM

growing

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:49 PM

the most surprising thing about this is how india has one of the worlds largest economies but is far behind both the united states and china as well as many european countries in economic growth. also how china can have the worlds number one economy but the united states is so far ahead in economic growth numbers, i suppose that china will not be on top for very long.

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How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze

How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
There may be a counterintuitive explanation for the deep freeze that hit New England this winter: The rapidly warming Arctic is causing big disruptions in the jet stream, which carries weather across North America. Is this the worst winter you've experienced?

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Boston, climate change, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
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Gail McAuliffe's curator insight, March 1, 2015 11:12 AM

Perhaps this article will sway some climate change skeptics...

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:33 AM

So bizarre how the rate of the arctic warming causes us to get smacked with the cold weather. Its one of those things that are like how does the jet stream actually work. Including the fact that California is getting hit with a major drought. 

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How Young People Are Pulling Jobs Back to City Centers

How Young People Are Pulling Jobs Back to City Centers | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
A new analysis suggests that jobs previously lost to the suburbs are returning to the core.

Via Nancy Watson
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The Anti-Pollution Documentary That's Taken China By Storm - NPR (blog)

The Anti-Pollution Documentary That's Taken China By Storm - NPR (blog) | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
A prominent journalist with a sick child quit her job and produced an eye-opening look at the consequences of China's air pollution problem. Some 200 million have watched it since the weekend.

Via Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Experts: Ebola Vaccine At Least 50 White People Away

Experts: Ebola Vaccine At Least 50 White People Away | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
CONAKRY, GUINEA—With the death toll in West Africa continuing to rise amid a new outbreak of the Ebola virus, leading medical experts announced Wednesday that a vaccine for the deadly disease is still at least 50 white people from being developed.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 10, 2014 8:34 PM

Yes, this is satire (and I do love the Onion), but there is so much more truth in this the many in the West would like to admit.  I wish that the there weren't elements of racism in the way we've talked about Ebola in the United States, but our development shields us from really needed to be worried.  The westerners that have been infected have been flown out and received a high level of care...not something that we'd dream of considering for other human beings who the international community has deemed unworthy for this same level of treat.  Yes, in part it's because of the raw numbers, but it feels like a lot more than just that.  

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The n-word: An entrenched racial slur now more prevalent than ever

The n-word: An entrenched racial slur now more prevalent than ever | Just real interesting | Scoop.it
The N-word: An entrenched racial slur now more prevalent than ever wapo.st/nwordproject

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 11, 2014 4:27 PM

This is a very solid article of the cultural layers of meaning that are embedded into this word and the usage of the word with is oh-so-slippery.