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Possession: ideas inspired by Jung

Possession: ideas inspired by Jung | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
 



 

Paul Levy never fails to excite me. This piece is from Awaken in the Dream, his blog.

ARE WE POSSESSED?
by Paul Levy

C. G. Jung, the great doctor of the soul and one ...

Via digizen, Eva Rider, Maxwell Purrington
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James Hillman/ New Kabbalah Website

James Hillman/ New Kabbalah Website | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Death as Healer, by Paulette C Turcotte

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THE DEPTH OF THE SOUL: JAMES HILLMAN’S VISION OF PSYCHOLOGY

Sanford L. Drob

For the past quarter century James Hillman has been creating a new vision of psychology, one in which psychology becomes a "supreme discipline" concerned not only with the psyche of humanity but the "soul" which is at the heart of the world. Vilified by some, he has been called brilliant, explosive and poetic by others. His ideas, through their popularization in the writings of the best selling author, Thomas Moore (1992, 1994), have reached millions, yet he is unheard of by many professional psychologists. While some psychologists have applauded Hillman's call for a return of the soul to a central place in psychology (Elkins, 1995), others have been put off by the fact that Hillman's own writings are critical of the humanist tradition, highly provocative and occasionally abstruse.

Hillman has been consistently critical of what he regards to be the basic assumption of contemporary humanistic psychology, the unity and essential "health" of the self. He is also critical of the humanistic (and spiritual) focus upon self-actualization and spirituality, as opposed to an experience of the chaos, multiplicity, and disentegrative aspects of the soul and the world (Hillman, 1977, pp. 180-3; Hillman, 1979). Yet a close examination of Hillman's ideas reveals them to be of great interest to humanistic psychologists and his position is far closer to humanistic/ spiritual psychology than he himself cares to acknowledge.

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Carl Jung on How Symbols Arise in Dreams to Explain the Unconscious

Carl Jung on How Symbols Arise in Dreams to Explain the Unconscious | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

"Just as conscious contents can vanish into the unconscious, new contents, which have never yet been conscious, can arise from it," wrote Carl Gustav Jung, pointing to the critical importance of translating the symbols which show up in our lives through dreams, art, mythology, film, literature and dozens of other sources.

 

In Man and His Symbols, Jung spoke eloquently about the way symbols communicate the contents of the unconscious to us, saying...

 

"Because there are innumerable things beyond the range of human understanding, we constantly use symbolic terms to represent concepts that we cannot define or fully comprehend. This is one reason why all religions employ symbolic language or images . But this conscious use of symbols is only one aspect of a psychological fact of great importance: Man also produces symbols unconsciously and spontaneously, in the form of dreams.... (Click title for more)


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Viviana Puebla's curator insight, October 16, 9:14 PM

Is  important to pay attention to symbolic language of the dreams, even if it displeases us like the nightmares we may have from time to time. They can teach us ways to understand better how we came to be and why we  choose to walk like this in the path of conscious life.

 

In the middle of the night ,covered by the protection of the dream world,  we tend to re-live those feeling who never acquire the proper wording so they never came to be in the light of the concious world.

 

Sometimes because they were dismissed , others, because we forget about what we don´t like  to disturb us  in the speedways of our existence.

But they are not forgotten by our inner self so they must acquire a voice of their own to be Heard by us in our life.

 

 

The painful feelings of loss and betrayal  re-lived in our dreams can affect our moods and preconceptions of our daily conscious life.

 

And by these the veils of the uncertainty of what is was and what is real now.

We start to re-enact those feelings searching for the clues of how they came to be unespected as we think they are, unwanted as they start to overthrow our world of day light : We become suspicious, sadder and angrier lossing ourselves in the mistranslations of the deeper meaning of this sensations. Affecting our relationships and our ability to function in life

 

Paying attention to the languaging of our dreams, tending the dreamworld means to start to understand this feelings and sensations in the ligth of the inner reaches of our unconcious , turning inwards to the symbolic, not outwards searching  scaping goats of our past experiencies.

 

Keeping us from the shadows of others but taking the toll of a live half lived. Until we decide to look and face this uncertainties as ours and because of that , looking for the way to make the sound of this symbolic language our way to converse and reach out the deeper meaning of our existence

 

Nightmares can effectively gallop wildly,  trembling the path of our existence, or if we learn to listen with attention and care to their symbolic languaging,  become our best friends and wise counsellors in the dawn of  our waking life

 

Dreams and symbols became the treasure map to our inner Gold.

Working towards a soul full life is an unexpected  and extraordinary journey. 

 

In order to Achieve complete fulfillment in life we must Become whole  again , to be able to recapture the discarded parts of ourselves entails the wisdom of hearing  the sounds and whispers of the language of  the life of the symbols in dreams  that give us the ability to Voice our Soul.

 

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung and Positive Aspects of the Mother Complex.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung and Positive Aspects of the Mother Complex. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Some people feel that nobody should read the book...

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Some people feel that nobody should read the book... | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it


 Some people feel that nobody should read the book, and some feel that everybody should read it. The truth is, nobody really knows. Most of what has been said about the book — what it is, what it means — is the product of guesswork, because from the time it was begun in 1914 in a smallish town in Switzerland, it seems that only about two dozen people have managed to read or even have much of a look at it.

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on the significance of the dreams of children

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on the significance of the dreams of children | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung and the Shadow: An Introduction

Carl Jung and the Shadow: An Introduction | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

The Jungian Shadow: Its Phenomenology, Detection and Conscious Integration

 Psychiatrist Carl Jung’s construct of the shadow, comprised of the denied aspects of the self (1959, p. 20), conceals within itself the golden key not only  to understanding the agency by which wars and feuds of all kinds tend to start, but the very solution to preventing their emergence in the first place. Such conflicts develop out of constricted, narrow views, and Jung claimed the shadow itself was the result of a narrow identification with the persona—the social mask, at the expense of the unattended aspects of the self (Bennett, 1966, p. 117.

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Carl Jung: As you know the angel of death has struck me down too and almost succeeded in wiping me off the slate.

Carl Jung: As you know the angel of death has struck me down too and almost succeeded in wiping me off the slate. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: A projection is a very tangible thing and can be created as a sort of projectile.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: A projection is a very tangible thing and can be created as a sort of projectile. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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The Hero as Soul Image: aims and instincts

The Hero as Soul Image: aims and instincts | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
In Symbols of Transformation, Carl Jung says that the hero myth “symbolizes the ideas, forms, and forces which grip and mold the soul." (para. 259) The hero is an image or form of the living soul, ...
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excerpt  Like Jung, Rank saw that there was an intimate relationship between dream and myth. Myths are dreams of the masses of the people, expressing the libidinal aims of the collective social body. The hero is the leading figure in our collective dream. Jung says, “the finest of all symbols of the libido is the human figure, conceived as a demon or hero.” The hero is an image of the ‘creative force’ that is within man (immanent) and also extends beyond man (transcendent).

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Paradox of the Tree of Death and Life

Paradox of the Tree of Death and Life | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
The image above by Berthold Furtmeyer (1481) is titled the Tree of Death and Life. This image illustrates the paradox and ambi-valence in the mother archetype.  Anne Baring describes the scene of t...
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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on “The Ego as being the visibility of the Self.”

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on “The Ego as being the visibility of the Self.” | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on the Spirituality of Plant Life, Animals and Divine Law

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on the Spirituality of Plant Life, Animals and Divine Law | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on Christ, Mob Psychology and The State

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on Christ, Mob Psychology and The State | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

[Carl Jung on Christ, Mob Psychology and The State]
Mr. Allemann: Then you would call Christ or Buddha exponents of mob psychology?

Prof jung:

It would be wrong to say "mob psychology," but they were surely exponents of the creative will that was coming up from the depths.

It was not without meaning that Christ was crucified between two thieves, and that his first disciples were fishermen and such people: there were very few educated people among them.

He moved in the lowest strata of the population and he answered to the expectation and need of the ordinary man, the recognition of immortality and all that.

He came at the end of a very special spiritual development, culminating in the Ptolemaic civilization, when the Osiris became the Osiris of every better man: the ordinary man had no Osiris because he had no decent burial.


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Jung, Individuation, and Shamanism

Jung, Individuation, and Shamanism | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

According to historian and philosopher Mircea Eliade, shamanism has been around for millennia, practically as long as humans have existed. In recent decades, the archetype of shamanism has experienced a rebirth. With growing consciousness, more and more individuals are recognizing spontaneously and consistently what our indigenous ancestors knew: that there is a divine intelligence at work in the universe, a life force of love andlight, of which, by nature and birthright, we are an integral part. 
Anne Baring (2007), psychologist and author, notes that C.G. Jung himself commented on the capacity of humans to respond to this greater force, saying:
The archetypal image of the wise man, the saviour or redeemer, lies buried and dormant in man's unconscious since the dawn of culture; it is awakened whenever the times are out of joint and a human society is committed to a serious error...These primordial images are … called into being by the waywardness of the general outlook. When conscious life is characterised by one-sidedness and by a false attitude, they are activated…"instinctively" … in the dreams of individuals and the visions of artists and seers... (Click title for more)


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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on the need for Mythic Statements.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on the need for Mythic Statements. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on the celebration of the Mass and Holy Communion.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on the celebration of the Mass and Holy Communion. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Last Encounter with Carl Jung and the Archetype of the Apocalypse

Last  Encounter with Carl Jung and the Archetype of the Apocalypse | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
  Last Encounter with Carl Jung   Miguel Serrano (Translated by Alex Kurtagic)   Editor's Note: This is a translation of the article by Serrano published by the Chilean newspaper El Mercurio on 16 July 1961, following Carl Jung's death,…
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excerpt:  The Archetype of the Apocalypse

         

The word Apocalypse (revelation) is from the Greek meaning "uncovering what has been hidden."  In other words, the revelation of new truth.

 

 

What is the Archetype of the Apocalypse all about?

 

For starters, it’s at the very core of what C.G. Jung believed is happening to the world today.  Jung's psychology is the only school of psychology that believes there are two centers to the psyche---the ego being the center of consciousness, and the archetype of the Self being the center of what he called the objective psyche, or the collective unconscious.  Other psychological schools certainly acknowledge two realms of the psyche, the conscious and unconscious, but only Jung posits the existence of two totally independent centers. 
 
In talking about archetypes, it helps to note that Jung's experience with archetypes was that they are dynamic patterns, fields of potential, which have both forceful intentionality and complete independence.  They are raw nature at the heart of the psyche, and, as such, serve as the foundational material for our complexes, both “good” and “bad.”  The central archetype, the Self, is the transpersonal center of the psyche, and acts as the instrument and agent of transcendence.  As such, it is indistinguishable from the God-image.   
 
The word "Apocalypse" (revelation) is from the Greek meaning "uncovering what has been hidden."  In other words, the revelation of new truth.  This process operates in four phases: revelation, judgment, destruction, and a new birth.  If we look back over two centuries, we see the revelation of torrents of new scientific, psychological and social truth; judgments or assessments made on the basis of this new truth; the collapse of beliefs and institutions based on the former truth, and are becoming dysfunctional within the context of the new truth; and the sprigs of the new worldview trying to blossom.  Destruction and new birth take place simultaneously, although the popular use of the word apocalypse has come to mean total destruction. 
 
But back to the archetype.  Just because an archetype exists in humans doesn't mean it's necessarily activated.  It could lie dormant for a person's entire life, or for the life of an age.  What Jung sees happening in our era is that the Self, the central archetype of order and meaning, has been activated in the collective unconscious.  And when the Self becomes activated, it means a change in the collective cultural worldview.  At the core of every cultural worldview is the God-image, whether it’s Christian, Moslem, Hindu or whatever.  (Buddhists don't subscribe to a God, but they believe in the Infinite, which, from a psychological standpoint, serves the same purpose.)  But when the Self is constellated, then the process of "uncovering what has been hidden," the Apocalypse, the "revelation of new truth," begins.  And this is a process that takes ages. 

 

Looking back, it may well have taken six hundred years for Christianity to emerge into being as a “religion.”  Many of the themes Jesus espoused go back at least to Ezekiel, who referred to himself as "Son of Man" (symbolically, "Son of God"), which was the way Jesus referred to himself.  Many of the early Church “fathers” believed some of the Psalms prefigured Jesus.  After Jesus died, it took another three hundred years for Christianity to solidify into a religion.  It wasn't that Jesus suddenly came on the scene, worked miracles and preached magnificent sermons, and presto, Christianity bloomed.  Not at all.  Jesus articulated and manifested what had been gradually growing in the collective psyche over an extended period of time.  And this happened as the gods of the Greco-Roman world were losing their hold on the imagination of the Greco-Roman “creative minority.”  Nietzsche's 1882 cry, "God is dead," was heard throughout the Roman Empire 2,000 years earlier in a similar cry, "Great Pan is dead."  In other words, the prevailing God-image of the Greco-Roman world had been losing its resonance and relevance in the depths of the collective psyche of the Greco-Roman world.  But at the same time, there was a psychic maturation taking place, which the old gods failed to express, but which Jesus expressed and manifested in a manner that resonated in the depths of the collective soul of that time.
 

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung and the most essential causes and conditions of dream processes.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung and the most essential causes and conditions of dream processes. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on what happens when a person with whom one was intimate dies.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on what happens when a person with whom one was intimate dies. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung on Suicide and Detachment of the Soul from the Body

Carl Jung on Suicide and Detachment of the Soul from the Body | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on Extrovert and Introvert “There is no such thing as schematic classification.”

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on Extrovert and Introvert “There is no such thing as schematic classification.” | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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Mother World: splitting, integration & evolution in the mother archetype

Mother World: splitting, integration & evolution in the mother archetype | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
Recently, I have been writing on the aims and instincts of the human soul. Carl Jung speaks of the human soul's "longing to attain rebirth through a return to the womb, and to become immortal like ...
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In order to understand the evolution of consciousness, we may liken the collective social body of civilization to an infant, attempting to birth itself out of the Mother World, out the womb of life. From an immanent perspective this is only a fantasy, there is no realm that exists beyond the Mother World. To believe so is only to partake in fantasies that might seek to denigrate and destroy the Mother. The truth is: we need this world, we need a connection to the ‘Soul of the World.’

Carl Jung opens a space for the realization of immanence, a realization of the psychical immanence of spiritual (archetypal) forms. We need only make one further shift in perspective to realize the full nature of ‘immanence.’ Here, I am not speaking of a Deleuzian immanence, but a Jungian immanence. This realization is not so much about a ‘pure plane of immanence’ (Deleuze), but a realization of ‘withinness.’ This realization is deeply related to images of the Mother World and of rebirth.

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on Maya and the “Great Illusion.”

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on the Spirituality of the Tree

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Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on The Tree of Life, World Tree, Tree of Evolution, Cosmic Tree, Soma Tree, The Human Spinal Column.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on The Tree of Life, World Tree, Tree of Evolution, Cosmic Tree, Soma Tree, The Human Spinal Column. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

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