Jung, Dreams, Mys...
Follow
Find
814 views | +2 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Jungian Depth Psychology and Dreams
Scoop.it!

The Necessity of an Ecopsychology of/as "Nature Religion"

The Necessity of an Ecopsychology of/as "Nature Religion" | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

As a psychologist of religion, I should like to make some observations about the relationship between the human psyche and the other-than-human natural world, in particular as one tradition in psychology sees that relationship. Let me begin by quoting words I take to be both exemplary for the tradition in question and pertinent to our discussion of "nature religion":

 

Yet there is so much that fills me: plants, animals, clouds, day and night, and the eternal in man. The more uncertain I have felt about myself, the more there has grown up in me a feeling of kinship with all things. In fact it seems to me as if that alienation which so long separated me from the world has become transferred into my own inner world, and has revealed to me an unexpected unfamiliarity with myself.

 

This striking passage appears on the last page of C.G. Jung's autobiography, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, written at the end of his long life and career in psychology. It was initially pointed out to me for its evocative oddness by James Hillman, Jung's revisionist successor, in connection with a theme Hillman has pursued since at least 1982, when he published an article on it entitled "Anima Mundi : The Return of the Soul to the World."

 

By this Hillman means the return of psychological subjectivity to the outer, non-human world, including the...


Via Bonnie Bright, Eva Rider
Paulette Turcotte's insight:

 

EXCERPT     But having understood what post-Jungians say are the sources and strictures of the alienation from nature that psychology has wrought, we need also to reflect on the strange shift Jung felt at the very end of his life and described at the close of his autobiography to inspire a reader like James Hillman.

 

We recall that, having felt a "kinship with all things" ("plants, animals, clouds, day and night, and the eternal in man"), Jung also encounters "an unexpected unfamiliarity" with himself, an uncertainty about himself. Here is confessed a startling reversal that we can see, with Hillman, as the genesis of a sweeping eco psychology, offering a measure of hope that the alienation from nature and the severe obstacles to a modern nature religion imposed by a psychological culture might be mitigated if not overturned.

 

Beyond modest if valuable ecopsychological efforts to psychoanalyze attitudes toward environmentalism or to use diagnostic categories to assess the mental causes of our historical divorce from nature, psychology's sense of the boundaries of the self will need to expand, so that the individual psyche, losing its familiar isolation, might become an "eco-psyche," participating in the subjectivity of the more-than-human as well as human realms. Such a reconceptualizing of the self would, at its most extreme, require that psychology revision its own nature and purpose, admittedly a political unlikelihood. Still, we who are trying to reflect upon nature religion's contemporary reality would be well-advised to take account of these post-Jungian issues and options.

 

Such a psychological education would learn, for instance, that through sensing a kind of widespread cultural grieving for the biosphere--perhaps that soulful recognition of the things of nature for which Peter Bishop called--post-Jungians also allow the possibility that psyche is manifesting itself once more in the outer world. This, at least, is an implication of Hillman's 1982 article on the return of the soul to the world, where he says that. . . that cataclysm, that pathologized image of the world destroyed, is awakening again a recognition of the soul in the world. The anima mundi stirs our hearts to respond: we are at last, in extremis , concerned about the world; love for it arising, material things again lovable. For where there is pathology there is psyche, and where psyche, eros. The things of the world again become precious, desirable, even pitiable in their millennial suffering from Western humanity's hubristic insult to material things.

 

The ramifications of Hillman's heartfelt words here are worth probing in relation to what I am proposing about the need for an ecopsychology in relation to "nature religion."

 

He emphasizes, for one thing, that "the more we confine interiority to within the individual, the more we lose the sense of soul as a psychic reality . . . within all things." Notice the critique of individualism that comes with this application of the anima mundi perspective. A return of soul to the world in a revolutionary ecopsychology will entail a more communitarian focus. As Hillman puts it,

 

In place of the familiar notion of psychic reality based on a system of private experiencing subjects and dead public objects, I want to advance a view prevalent in many cultures (called primitive and animistic by Western cultural anthropologists), which also returned for a short while in ours at its glory through Florence and Marsilio Ficino. I am referring to the world soul [anima mundi ] of Platonism which means nothing less than the world ensouled.

 

But it is important to understand that the Renaissance sense of an anima mundi , which he significantly equates here with tribal animism, is not only a "view" being "advanced" by Hillman intellectually. It is also, he insists, a presence experienced through the pain of our alienation from the world , including our mistreatment of non-human nature. "Psychology," he says, "always advances its consciousness by means of pathologized revelations, through the Underworld of anxiety. Our ecological fears announce that things are where the soul now claims psychological attention." This assertion connects to the point mentioned above about the appropriateness of cultural grieving, what the late Michael Perlman wrote about as an "ecology of mourning."

 

 

 

more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, March 30, 12:31 AM

Jung, Hillman and "the kinship with all things"

Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from KINSHIP COMMUNITY NETWORK
Scoop.it!

Clarissa Pinkola Estés on the Animus as a Merchant of Soul

Clarissa Pinkola Estés on the Animus as a Merchant of Soul | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
“By classical Jungian definition, animus is the soul-force in women, and is considered masculine. However, many women psychoanalysts, including myself, have, through personal observation, come to r...

Via Michael Goodman
more...
Michael Goodman's curator insight, June 15, 2:31 PM

Thank you Symbol Reader!

Laura M. Smith's curator insight, June 15, 7:52 PM

I love Dr. Clarissa's description of the Animus. I also love the words she uses to describe him: Merchant, Surveyor, Gamesman, also helper, lover, brother, father, King! To this list I would add trick-ester and agent provocateur!

prachi dang's comment, June 16, 4:05 AM
you should see this, check it out , an eye opener!..:O - http://goo.gl/mrgbh2
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Carl Jung Depth Psychology
Scoop.it!

The Death of Carl Jung and “Synchronicity.”

The Death of Carl Jung and “Synchronicity.” | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Via Maxwell Purrington
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paulette Turcotte
Scoop.it!

Seven Days with Carl Jung, Part I of II

Seven Days with Carl Jung, Part I of II | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
I will spend one week alone in the country, in a comfortable guest house lent to me by a friend living near Uppsala, Sweden, reading and immersing myself in the book by the renown psychologist Carl...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paulette Turcotte
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on “Personality.” Lexicon.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on “Personality.” Lexicon. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Personality:

Aspects of the soul as it functions in the world. (See also individuality.)

For the development of personality, differentiation from collective values, particularly those embodied in and adhered to by the persona, is essential.

A change from one milieu to another brings about a striking alteration of personality, and on each occasion a clearly defined character emerges that is noticeably different from the previous one. . . . 

The social character is oriented on the one hand by the expectations and demands of society, and on the other by the social aims and aspirations of the individual. The domestic character is, as a rule, moulded by emotional demands and an easy-going acquiescence for the sake of comfort and convenience; when it frequently happens that men who in public life are extremely energetic, spirited, obstinate, wilful and ruthless appear good-natured, mild, compliant, even weak, when at home and in the bosom of the family. Which is the true character, the real personality? . . .

. . . . In my view the answer to the above question should be that such a man has no real character at all: he is not individual but collective, the plaything of circumstance and general expectations. Were he individual, he would have the same character despite the variation of attitude. He would not be identical with the attitude of the moment, and he neither would nor could prevent his individuality from expressing itself just as clearly in one state as in another.["Definitions," CW 6, pars. 798f.]

http://www.nyaap.org/jung-lexicon/p/

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Jungian Depth Psychology and Dreams
Scoop.it!

The Quest for the Divine: Jung on Psychology & Spirituality

The Quest for the Divine: Jung on Psychology & Spirituality | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
In this live webinar out of Zurich, Dr.Murray Stein explores Jung’s spiritual journey through his midlife exploration of the “spirit of the depths”...

Via bobbie_pimm@bobbieann.net, Eva Rider
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paulette Turcotte
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung: the child image represents the future

Carl Jung: the child image represents the future | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
"One of the essential features of the child motif is its futurity. The child is potential future. Hence the occurrence of the child motif in the psychology of the individual signifies as a rule an ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung on Astrology and the Birth of Christ

Carl Jung on Astrology and the Birth of Christ | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

 Image: The Great Conjunction of 7 B.C. at the time of the Magi.

(thanks to Maxwell Purrington)

 

 I have dwelt at some length on the dualistic aspects of the Christ-figure because, through the fish symbolism, Christ was assimilated into a world of ideas that seems far removed from the gospels a world of pagan origin, saturated with astrological beliefs to an extent that we can scarcely imagine today.

 Christ was born at the beginning of the aeon of the Fishes. It is by no means ruled out that there were educated Christians who knew of the coniunctio maxima of Jupiter and Saturn in Pisces in the year 7 B.C., just as, according to the gospel reports, there were Chaldaeans who actually found Christ's birthplace. The Fishes, however, are a double sign.

 At midnight on Christmas Eve, when (according to the old time-reckoning) the sun enters Capricorn, Virgo is standing on the eastern horizon, and is soon followed by the Serpent held by Ophiuchus, the "Serpent-bearer." This astrological coincidence seems to me worth mentioning, as also the view that the two fishes are mother and son.

 The latter idea has a quite special significance because this relationship suggests that the two fishes were originally one. In fact, Babylonian and Indian astrology know of only one fish.

 Later, this mother evidently gave birth to a son, who was a fish like her. The same thing happened to the Phoenician Derceto-Atargatis, who, half fish herself, had a son called Ichthys.

 It is just possible that "the sign of the prophet Jonah" goes back to an older tradition about an heroic night sea journey and conquest of death, where the hero is swallowed by a fish ("whale-dragon") and is then reborn.

 The redemptory name Joshua (Yehoshua, Yeshua, Gr. lesous) is connected with the fish: Joshua is the son of Nun, and Nun means 'fish.'

 The Joshua ben Nun of the Khidr legend had dealings with a fish that was meant to be eaten but was revived by a drop of water from the fountain of life. ~Carl Jung, Aion, The Historical Significance of the Fish, Paragraphs 172-173.

 Image: The Great Conjunction of 7 B.C. at the time of the Magi.

[Carl Jung on Astrology and the Birth of Christ]

 I have dwelt at some length on the dualistic aspects of the Christ-figure because, through the fish symbolism, Christ was assimilated into a world of ideas that seems far removed from the gospels a world of pagan origin, saturated with astrological beliefs to an extent that we can scarcely imagine today.

 Christ was born at the beginning of the aeon of the Fishes. It is by no means ruled out that there were educated Christians who knew of the coniunctio maxima of Jupiter and Saturn in Pisces in the year 7 B.C., just as, according to the gospel reports, there were Chaldaeans who actually found Christ's birthplace. The Fishes, however, are a double sign.

 At midnight on Christmas Eve, when (according to the old time-reckoning) the sun enters Capricorn, Virgo is standing on the eastern horizon, and is soon followed by the Serpent held by Ophiuchus, the "Serpent-bearer." This astrological coincidence seems to me worth mentioning, as also the view that the two fishes are mother and son.

 The latter idea has a quite special significance because this relationship suggests that the two fishes were originally one. In fact, Babylonian and Indian astrology know of only one fish.

 Later, this mother evidently gave birth to a son, who was a fish like her. The same thing happened to the Phoenician Derceto-Atargatis, who, half fish herself, had a son called Ichthys.

 It is just possible that "the sign of the prophet Jonah" goes back to an older tradition about an heroic night sea journey and conquest of death, where the hero is swallowed by a fish ("whale-dragon") and is then reborn.

 The redemptory name Joshua (Yehoshua, Yeshua, Gr. lesous) is connected with the fish: Joshua is the son of Nun, and Nun means 'fish.'

 The Joshua ben Nun of the Khidr legend had dealings with a fish that was meant to be eaten but was revived by a drop of water from the fountain of life. ~Carl Jung, Aion, The Historical Significance of the Fish, Paragraphs 172-173.

 Image: The Great Conjunction of 7 B.C. at the time of the Magi.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Carl Jung Depth Psychology
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Puer aeternus. Latin for "eternal child," used in mythology to designate a child-god who is forever young

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Puer aeternus. Latin for "eternal child," used in mythology to designate a child-god who is forever young | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Via Maxwell Purrington
more...
Eva Rider's curator insight, March 24, 12:27 AM

Puer Aeternus - Peter Pan - fantasy and the land of shadows

Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Jungian Depth Psychology and Dreams
Scoop.it!

Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle. (From Vol. 8. of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung) (Jung Extracts)

Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle. (From Vol. 8. of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung) (Jung Extracts) | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
Synchronicity: An Acausal Connecting Principle. (From Vol. 8. of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung) (Jung Extracts) Offer Price $9.13 ISBN:0691150508 Authors C. G.

Via Eva Rider
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Jungian Depth Psychology and Dreams
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Jung and Teilhard de Chardin

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Jung and Teilhard de Chardin | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
"Teilhard de Chardin and Carl Jung never met. Dr. Jung did finish reading The Phenomenon of Man less than a month before his death. The book had both a great and visible impact upon Dr. Jung according to Michael Serrano. It must have been satisfying for Dr. Jung to see Teilhard de Chardin from the perspective of a paleontologist and Jesuit Priest reach the same empirical conclusions about the evolution of consciousness that Dr. Jung found in his empirical research in Depth Psychology. It is a peculiar oddity that both Teilhard de Chardin and Dr. Jung stressed the empirical nature of their work yet often find their books categorized under "Philosophy" and "New Age." This in itself justifies the importance of this great book as the recognition of consciousness and the reality of the inner world of the soul is far from recognized even at the dawn of the 21st century" ~Lewis Lafontaine Carl Jung was reading Teilhard de Chardin during the last few days of his life. According to Miguel Serrano, when he visited Jung on May 10, 1961, "On the small table beside the chair where Jung was sitting, was a book called The Human Phenomenon by Teilhard de Chardin. I asked Jung whether he had read it. 'It is a great book,' he said. His face was pale, but seemed strangely illuminated by an inner light." (Miguel Serrano, C.G. Jung and Hermann Hesse: A Record of Two Friendships [New York: Schocken Books, 1968] pp. 100-101) Jung died on June 6, 1961.

Via Bonnie Bright, Eva Rider, Solāēr 9
more...
Kathy Mays's curator insight, March 7, 3:50 AM















Beth Moon photograph


Poem by Pierre Teilhard de Chardin

"When the signs of age begin to mark my body

(and still more when they touch my mind);

when the ill that is to diminish me or carry me off

strikes from without or is born within me;

when the painful moment comes

in which I suddenly awaken

to the fact that I am ill or growing old;

and above all at that last moment

when I feel I am losing hold of myself

and am absolutely passive within the hands

of the great unknown forces that have formed me;

in all those dark moments, O God,

grant that I may understand that it is you

(provided only my faith is strong enough)

who are painfully parting the fibers of my being 

in order to penetrate to the very marrow

of my substance and bear me away within yourself."

 

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1880-1955)  

from the book The jesuit Guide to (almost) Everything by James Martin

 
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Carl Jung Depth Psychology
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung on the Androgyny of Christ.

Carl Jung on the Androgyny of Christ. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Via Maxwell Purrington
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Carl Jung Depth Psychology
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung on his "Anima."

Carl Jung on his "Anima." | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Via Maxwell Purrington
more...
Aladin Fazel's curator insight, March 13, 3:14 PM

Such initiations were often connected with the peril of death and so served to express the archetypal idea of death and rebirth.

Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Carl Jung Depth Psychology
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung two days before his death.

Carl Jung two days before his death. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Via Maxwell Purrington
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paulette Turcotte
Scoop.it!

Seven Days with Carl Jung, Part IIa

Seven Days with Carl Jung, Part IIa | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
If you had read Part I of this two-part article, you were undoubtedly expecting “Part II” to appear here without the little ‘a’ attached. The reason for this incomplete follow-up is that I still ha...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paulette Turcotte
Scoop.it!

Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung on Human Personality in Rare BBC Interview

Iconic Psychiatrist Carl Jung on Human Personality in Rare BBC Interview | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
"Man cannot stand a meaningless life."

Legendary Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung (July 26, 1875--June 6, 1961), along with his frenem
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paulette Turcotte
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on "Suicide."

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on "Suicide." | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

( 25 July, 1946) Carl Jung in a letter to Eleanor Bertine concerning Kristine Mann’s death dated 25 July 1946.

“It is really a question whether a person affected by such a terrible illness should or may end her life. It is my attitude in such cases not to interfere. I would let things happen as they were so, because I’m convinced that if anybody has it in himself to commit suicide, then practically the whole of his being is going that way. I have seen cases where it would have been something short of criminal to hinder the people because according to all rules it was in accordance with the tendency of their unconscious and thus the basic thing. So I think nothing is really gained by interfering with such an issue. It is presumably to be left to the free choice of the individual. Anything that seems to be wrong to us can be right under certain circumstances over which we have no control and then end of which we do not understand. If Kristine Mann had committed suicide under the stress of unbearable pain, I should have thought that this was the right thing. As it was not the case, I think it was in her stars to undergo such a cruel agony for reasons that escape out understanding. Our life is not made entirely by ourselves. The main bulk of it is brought into existence out of sources that are hidden to us. Even complexes can start a century or more before a man is born. There is something like karma.” ~Carl (Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 435-436."  excerpt

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Jungian Depth Psychology and Dreams
Scoop.it!

Numbers as Archetypes

Numbers as Archetypes | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
Numbers as Archetypes. A unique visual and interpretive page devoted to the symbolic, Jungian oriented meaning behind the basic numbers zero through thirteen.

Via Zeteticus, Eva Rider
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paulette Turcotte
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on “Depression.” Lexicon.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung on “Depression.” Lexicon. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Carl Jung on “Depression.” Lexicon.
Depression:
A psychological state characterized by lack of energy. 

Energy not available to consciousness does not simply vanish. 

It regresses and stirs up unconscious contents (fantasies, memories, wishes, etc.) that for the sake of psychological health need to be brought to light and examined.

Depression should therefore be regarded as an unconscious compensation whose content must be made conscious if it is to be fully effective.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Carl Jung Depth Psychology
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung and Christ as a “Mediator” in Active Imagination.

Carl Jung and Christ as a “Mediator” in Active Imagination. | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Via Maxwell Purrington
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Jungian Depth Psychology and Dreams
Scoop.it!

Tasha Tollman review - Jung on Active Imagination: key readings selected by Joan Chodorow

Tasha Tollman review - Jung on Active Imagination: key readings selected by Joan Chodorow | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
A Tasha Tollman reviews "Jung on Active Imagination" by Joan Chodorow.

Via e-jungian, Eva Rider
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Jungian Depth Psychology and Dreams
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: In a way the animal is more pious than man, because it fulfills the divine will more completely...

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung: In a way the animal is more pious than man, because it fulfills the divine will more completely... | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

Via Maxwell Purrington, Solāēr 9, Eva Rider
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paulette Turcotte from Jungian Depth Psychology and Dreams
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung, at 85 yrs.,reflecting on the aging process

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: Carl Jung, at 85 yrs.,reflecting on the aging process | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it

It is at all events the gradual breaking down of the bodily machine, with which foolishness identifies as ourselves.

It is indeed a major effort– the magnum opus in fact– to escape in time from the narrowness of its embrace and to liberate our mind to the vision of the immensity of the world, of which we form an infinitesimal part.


Via Eva Rider
more...
Paulette Turcotte's curator insight, January 31, 4:47 PM

The age of the body is something we often swindle ourselves about, but this swindle does not help the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Modern Psychology, Page 213.

Scooped by Paulette Turcotte
Scoop.it!

Seminal papers: "Emotions and Object Relations" by John Weir Perry - e-jungian.com

Seminal papers: "Emotions and Object Relations" by John Weir Perry - e-jungian.com | Jung, Dreams, Mysticism and the Shamanic | Scoop.it
The paper by John Weir Perry about the psychology of emotions in the context of the theory of psychic complexes.
more...
No comment yet.