Cancer Survivorship
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A 3-stage model of patient-centered communication for addressing cancer patients’ emotional distress

A 3-stage model of patient-centered communication for addressing cancer patients’ emotional distress | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

Results

A three-stage, conceptual model for assisting clinicians to more effectively address the challenges of recognizing, exploring, and managing cancer patients’ emotional distress in the clinical encounter was developed. To enhance and enact recognition of patients’ emotions, clinicians can engage in mindfulness, self-situational awareness, active listening, and facilitative communication. To enact exploration, clinicians can acknowledge and validate emotions and provide empathy. Finally, clinicians can provide information empathetically, identify therapeutic resources, and give referrals and interventions as needed to help lessen patients’ emotional distress.

Conclusion

This model serves as a framework for future research examining pathways that link clinicians’ emotional cue recognition to patient-centered responses exploring a patient's emotional distress to therapeutic actions that contribute to improved psychological and emotional health.

Practical implications

Specific communicative and cognitive strategies are presented that can help clinicians better recognize a patient's emotional distress and respond in ways that have therapeutic value.


Via rob halkes
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rob halkes's curator insight, January 23, 2014 10:54 AM

Guideline for physicians, great!

(just a pity that the full publication needs to be heavily paid..)

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Overdiagnosis, Overtreatment and an Open Dialog About Cancer

Overdiagnosis, Overtreatment and an Open Dialog About Cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

This discussion is intricate, in part because of the complexity and diversity of the hundreds of different pre-cancerous lesions and invasive cancers we face. There is not, nor should there be, one set of simple and universal rules when it comes to evaluating cancer risks, screening, and diagnosis.

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Caring for yourself after treatment

Caring for yourself after treatment | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

The recommendations for cancer survivors are no different for anyone who wants to improve his or her health: Exercise, eat a balanced diet and maintain a healthy weight. But for cancer survivors, these strategies have added benefits. Simple steps can improve your quality of life, smoothing your transition into survivorship.

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Heather Swift's curator insight, August 12, 2013 11:47 AM

The recommendations for cancer survivors are no different for anyone who wants to improve his or her health: Exercise, eat a balanced diet and maintain a healthy weight. But for cancer survivors, these strategies have added benefits. Simple steps can improve your quality of life, smoothing your transition into survivorship.

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Prevalence and Predictors of the Short-Term Trajectory of Anxiety and Depression in the First Year After a Cancer Diagnosis: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study

Prevalence and Predictors of the Short-Term Trajectory of Anxiety and Depression in the First Year After a Cancer Diagnosis: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

Few studies have examined psychological adjustment for cancer survivors in late treatment and early survivorship stages. Our study investigated the prevalence and short-term trajectories of anxiety, depression, and comorbid anxiety-depression among adult cancer survivors, and identified the individual, disease, health behavior, psychological, and social predictors of chronic and late psychological morbidity.

Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

Targeted psychological screening of vulnerable survivors and early intervention may prevent the onset and/or reduce the severity of psychological morbidity in early survivorship. Trials of risk reduction interventions targeting psychological functioning and health risk behaviors seem warranted.

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17 Tips for Cancer Caregivers

17 Tips for Cancer Caregivers | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Coping with Cancer provides resources for cancer survivors, cancer caregivers, and cancer medical professionals.
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Opportunities for Improving Psychosocial Care for Cancer Survivors

Opportunities for Improving Psychosocial Care for Cancer Survivors | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

The quality of psychosocial care provided to patients with cancer has received increased attention since the 2008 publication of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report entitled “Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Addressing Psychosocial Health Needs.”The report concluded that, despite evidence for the effectiveness of psychosocial care, many patients who could benefit from these services do not receive them. Among the report's main recommendations was that processes should be in place to identify patients' psychosocial needs and then link patients with appropriate services to address those needs.

Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

The efforts of the last decade have established the importance of ensuring access to psychosocial services for cancer survivors. Moving forward, we need to determine the most effective practices and how best to deliver them across diverse settings. Distress, like cancer, is not a single entity, and one treatment does not fit all. Psychosocial oncology needs to increase its research in comparative effectiveness, health services, and outcomes. The ultimate impact of screening programs, provider discussions, and increased access to psychosocial care hinges on the treatment. The next few years will include countless natural experiments as screening programs are implemented. If we are proactive, we can use these data to create successful systems in which all cancer survivors will have some discussion with their providers about psychosocial care, whether or not they choose to use psychosocial services.

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App helps cancer patients, survivors use nutrition to improve health

App helps cancer patients, survivors use nutrition to improve health | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
A new app for the iPhone helps cancer patients and survivors use nutrition to improve their health.The app "Ask the Nutritionist: Recipes for Fighting Cancer," created by dieticians at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, provides recipes and tips for...
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Users can search recipes based on their specific disease type, or symptoms they are experiencing, such as nausea or mouth sores.

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Practising in partnership with Dr Google - Focus - November-December-2013 Issue 57 - Cancer World - Shaping the future of cancer care

Practising in partnership with Dr Google - Focus - November-December-2013 Issue 57 - Cancer World - Shaping the future of cancer care | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Online communities can help patients learn about and weigh up the options open to them.
Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

add your insight...

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Personalised cancer care: where do we stand today?

Personalised cancer care: where do we stand today? | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Since the concept of personalised cancer therapies first emerged, the picture has become so much more complex and challenging. .
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Music as a method of coping with cancer: A qualitative study among cancer patients in Sweden

Music as a method of coping with cancer: A qualitative study among cancer patients in Sweden | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
(2013). Music as a method of coping with cancer: A qualitative study among cancer patients in Sweden. Arts & Health: Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 152-165. doi: 10.1080/17533015.2013.780087
Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

This study investigated patients' understanding of the role of music in coping and in influencing their well-being. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted based on semi-structured interviews with 17 cancer patients. Participants were chosen from a group of patients who had listened to or played music as a means of coping with their illness. Results: The study shows the importance of considering the roles that different kinds of music play in coping with cancer. The music of nature, healing music, religious music and cheerful music each have different benefits for patients. Conclusions: A patient's situation and his or her individual characteristics determine the types of music that can act as a useful or harmful coping strategy. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the types of individual characteristics that can make listening to different kinds of music a helpful or harmful coping method.

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How to Help Your Children Cope with Your Diagnosis

How to Help Your Children Cope with Your Diagnosis | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Coping with Cancer provides resources for cancer survivors, cancer caregivers, and cancer medical professionals.
Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

How can I help my children cope with my cancer diagnosis? This ques­tion is one of the first many parents ask after being diagnosed with cancer. It may seem inevitable that cancer will have an impact on your child’s life. But the good news is, with healthy coping strategies and open communication among family members, the impact can be positive and meaningful.

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Cancer Survivors And Their Partners At Greater Risk Of Anxiety, Not Depression

Cancer Survivors And Their Partners At Greater Risk Of Anxiety, Not Depression | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Long-term cancer survivors are not at a much higher risk of developing depression compared with healthy people. They are more likely to experience anxiety.
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Study: Sleep Disturbance Associated With Post Cancer Fatigue

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Reading the Fine Print on Cancer Treatment and Side Effects

Reading the Fine Print on Cancer Treatment and Side Effects | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Researchers found that nearly one-third of reports on large, randomized studies over-emphasize some benefits of therapy. In the majority of reports evaluated, the investigators found insufficient attention or discussion of treatment side effects.
Marie Ennis-O'Connor's insight:

Doctors' primary, most objective source of information are published reports of clinical trials. It would help patients if journal editors would assure that articles reporting on clinical cancer studies mention, in the abstract summary, any significant treatment toxicity. That way, it's more likely the potential down-sides of a treatment, old or new, won't escape the doctor's mind.

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