Journalism & Social Media
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Manual retweets are self-promotion and Twitter embeds aren't journalism

Manual retweets are self-promotion and Twitter embeds aren't journalism | Journalism & Social Media | Scoop.it
Jeb Lund: The real ethical question about embedded Tweets isn't related to privacy. It's about intellectual larceny
Tiffany Yeo's insight:

Many journalists have started using Twitter to promote their work; but many have different opinions on the usage of Twitter on journalism. Some say Twitter helps people to effectively share their work to their followers, and these followers can in turn use retweets (RTs) to help promote their work even further, even to all around the world. It is alarming to note that some of these journalists even include their number of Twitter followers on their resumes when interviewing for jobs, so as to let their interviewers know that they are capable of promoting their work effectively, and it would be definitely worth it to hire them. However, retweeting other people's work is actually a form of violation; it might cause trouble instead of bringing positive outcomes, such a plagiarism. 

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Why Online Audiences' Mobile Migration Isn't Bad for Blogs | Digital - Advertising Age

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Instead of visiting blogs such as Tumblr, Wordpress, and Blogger through websites, users have moved to visiting these webpages through their mobile phones. The number of people using websites to visit these blogs have declined greatly (an alarming rate of 2-digit declines!) while the number of people using mobile has grown. A Tumblr spokeswoman said mobile engagement -- follows, likes and reblogs -- has grown by 124% over the past year and combined web and mobile engagement is up by 45%. Mobile audiences usually jump from one app to another app, never spending too much time on just one. The term "snacking" is used to describe this behavior, while "dining" is used to describe people camping on a website for a long period of time. 

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13 Writing Tools To Instantly Enhance The Quality of Your Blog

13 Writing Tools To Instantly Enhance The Quality of Your Blog | Journalism & Social Media | Scoop.it
There's one thing that separates great blog posts from the rest: Giving the reader what they truly, deeply want. If you find yourself writing post after post but being less than overwhelmed by the response, it might be time to...
Tiffany Yeo's insight:

Other than the main social media apps such as Twitter, FaceBook, and Instagram, journalists have also started to use blogs to write and share their work with the public. This post shares a number of writing tools, which help journalists to instantly enhance the quality of their blogs. Firstly, sharing their story helps readers to engage and put themselves into their shoes. Emotions usually win when it comes to decision-making. Also, being direct can bring attention to readers, instead of boring them with constant rambling. Another important thing to note is show evidence, such as posting images to support their words. It has been proven that images capture more attention rather than just words. Referencing is also essential, as it gets readers to trust what they write if they include credible sources, such as citing experts in the topic that you are writing about. Summarizing main points also allows readers to have a quick understanding about the topic if they do not have time to read through the whole blog post. Lastly, call for action if they want readers to do something after reading the blog; for example, leave a review, or think about something important. 

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The 60-second interview: Taylor Lorenz, head of social media, The Daily Mail/Mail Online | Capital New York

The 60-second interview: Taylor Lorenz, head of social media, The Daily Mail/Mail Online | Capital New York | Journalism & Social Media | Scoop.it
The 60-second interview: Taylor Lorenz, head of social media, The Daily Mail/Mail Online
Tiffany Yeo's insight:

Taylor Lorenz, head of social media for The Daily Mail and Mail Online, was interviewed on social media and journalism. One of her main job scopes is to identify trends and develop strategies to foster and grow Mail Online community engagement and readership across social networks. She states that although The Daily Mail is an organization in the U.K, it has become the largest English language newspaper site in the world, due to the existence and usage of social media sites. She tailors stories according to their audience interests, and constantly sell the same stories in various ways depending on the channel they post at. 

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Social media newsgathering

Social media newsgathering | Journalism & Social Media | Scoop.it
BBC world affairs producer Stuart Hughes explains how social media has become key to his daily newsgathering routine.
Tiffany Yeo's insight:

The video explains how BBC world affairs producer Stuart Hughes uses social media to assist and complement his daily newsgathering routine. One of the main social media apps he uses is Twitter, as it has thousands of news sources internationally. However, he mentions that the Twitter website is not user-friendly, therefore it would be more effective to use other 3rd party apps such as Hootsuite or Tweetdeck to navigate and explore, as they show what people are tweeting at just a glance. Hashtags are another important tool which he uses to filter the content which he needs. Another social media site is uses is FaceBook, whereby he will be able to search communities of interests, and also to make sure he does not miss out on any important news by looking at what his friends are posting. FaceBook also allows him to reach out to people to give their views and useful information on news stories he is writing about. One important point to note is that, he mentioned that social media has become so integrated and essential in his routine, that he is unable to imagine what would happen if social media does not exist. I feel that this is a growing cause for concern, as people have become so over-reliant on social media, that it has become impossible to live without it. 

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12 social media tools for journalists | Media news

12 social media tools for journalists | Media news | Journalism & Social Media | Scoop.it
In an increasingly vital area for journalists, here are 12 tools journalists can use to search, monitor or curate content from the social web
Tiffany Yeo's insight:

Social media has become increasingly popular for journalists, making it essential for them to use social media tools to promote their work. This article shares 12 social media tools which are extremely helpful to journalists for engaging with users and newsgathering. One interesting tool is Rebelmouse, which is a social media aggregator that organizes content from other social media sites such as Twitter, FaceBook, Instagram, YouTube, to name a few. Users can use hashtags to filter the results for curation. Another tool called Swayy, helps to find valuable and interesting content on social media platforms. It automatically searches popular videos, articles and blog posts on the web. A free tool for tracking Twitter conversations, TChat is extremely useful for journalists who are taking part in live Q&As, or covering conferences and events. Buffer, another free platform, allows users to schedule posts in advance for several social media accounts. This enables users to post without worrying whether they would have the time to go online to manually share information. 

 

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BBC Academy - Journalism - Original journalism: Finding stories

BBC Academy - Journalism - Original journalism: Finding stories | Journalism & Social Media | Scoop.it
Producers give their tips on where to look for stories and how to come up with creative ideas for original journalism.
Tiffany Yeo's insight:

Social media sites have become huge in-thing for journalists; it helps journalists to source for original stories, new case studies, contacts, and pictures. Even though these information can be easily accessed using apps such as Twitter and FaceBook, it is hard to discern whether these information are genuine and credible. Rather than replacing traditional journalism skills, social media helps to enhance these skills. 

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Introducing Facebook Mentions: A New App for Public Figures | Facebook Newsroom

Introducing Facebook Mentions: A New App for Public Figures | Facebook Newsroom | Journalism & Social Media | Scoop.it
Today, we're introducing Facebook Mentions, a new app that makes it easy for public figures to talk with their fans and each other on the go.
Tiffany Yeo's insight:

FaceBook Mentions, is a new FaceBook Creative Labs app that makes interactions between users and public figures even better. It allows public figures to see what users are saying about them and respond to them, hosting live interaction sessions, share information, and get streamlined notifications about their posts. However, I hope that FaceBook Mentions will become international, as it is currently only available in the US for verified users. I foresee that FaceBook Mentions will become a new big thing in the future, as it is one of the easiest way for people to interact with journalists and share their personal stories and experiences; something that is difficult to do so on many other platforms. 

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Facebook’s illusion of choice

Facebook’s illusion of choice | Journalism & Social Media | Scoop.it
The morality of push journalism in an algorithmic world
Tiffany Yeo's insight:

Social media has become so integrated into our lives, we have become passive people in searching for news, letting news find us instead of actively searching for it. It has become worrying that one would rather scroll through his FaceBook news feed to "coincidentally" find news, rather than purposefully walking to the newspaper stand to grab a newspaper to read. It has become almost impossible to get unbiased views on global issues on Facebook, and to quote an impactful short paragraph from this article, "Facebook has all the power. You have almost none. We may be the recipient of content on Facebook’s news feed, but we are not necessarily the beneficiary. To put it another way, we’re not the consumers, we're the product.". FaceBook chooses to show content on news feeds based on five main factors- Interest, Post, Creator, Type, Recency. FaceBook is the curator of content; it chooses what it wants to show, rather than let us see every single bit of content. It gives us the illusion that we have a choice in choosing what we want to know; however, it is not the case. Twitter, on the other hand, shows every tweet a user posts, handing us control over the information we receive. It is indeed scary, to realize how social media has control over our interactions with online news. 

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Apps fuel journalism’s second disruption

Apps fuel journalism’s second disruption | Journalism & Social Media | Scoop.it
Whenever I talk to journalists about the mobile shift, they’re quick to defend the web over mobile apps. After all, the web is what journalists know best after years of playing digital catch up.


This bias has played out in product development. Many news organizations (even some new startups) have opted to invest more resources into responsive web design over creating and marketing compelling apps. In large part, that’s because good, differentiated apps are much more expensive to build, market and maintain. In the world of limited resources, what we know gets the attention.


But with each new study on mobile consumption, it’s becoming clearer that apps are not only winning, but dominating the field at the expense of the web. Sure, the desktop web is now in decline, but a new report by Comscore goes as far as saying the mobile web is flattening in share.


From October 2013 to May of this year — just 7 months time — mobile apps grew from 41% to 51% share of all time spent with digital media. Over the same time period, the mobile web remained flat at 9%, according to Comscore. Apps are driving the overwhelming majority of digital media growth.


Comscore broke it down by a few properties. For Gannett, for example, the split is nearly even: smartphone users spend 54% of their time on a Gannett website compared to 46% in a Gannett app. For The Weather Channel, users spend only 13% of their time on Weather.com compared to 87% in the app. And just 6% of Facebook users’ time is spent on Facebook.com on their phones.


News organizations with languishing apps are quick to point out that their website substantially outperforms their app. Not to mention, they expain, mobile revenue is non-existent. But that’s a self-fulfilling strategic mistake: resource allocation decisions should be based on where consumers are going, not where they’ve been. The less you invest in apps, the more poorly they perform. And history has taught us, where consumers go, the money will follow. It’s already happening — fast.


Waiting until the dust settles may prove to be fatal. While app use explodes, “the average number of apps owners used had barely risen over the past two years, from 23.2 in Q4 2011 to 26.8 in Q4 2013,” explained eMarketer, citing Nielsen data. Loyalties are forming, and it’s becoming even more difficult than ever to crack into the app business this late in the game.


Adding fuel to the fire, Facebook and other social apps continue to gain share and solidy their own loyal user bases as de facto destinations for news. At the same time, people are visiting home pages less, coming in social side doors. If you don’t have a solid app, you’re handing over the front door on the fastest growing distribution platform to someone else. Those who own the front doors can gather user data and by extension monetize at scale. (Sound familiar?)


Even Buzzfeed, which helped write the book on social discovery and referrals, understands the destination value of apps. On any given day, its app is neck-and-neck with CNN in the App Store (a big investment), and the app’s tremendous growth helped Buzzfeed vault over NYTimes in total visitors several months ago.


For those news organizations investing heavily in apps, the benefits are starting to become clear. Once you start growing a loyal app audience, users consume and share content much more frequently — in many cases, exponentially more than web users. Users are more comfortable sharing data with apps that adapt to their needs, laying the groundwork for targeted advertising and a sustainable business.


If you’re good at apps, you’ve built a strong foundation to extend to new platforms that don’t run on browsers. At Breaking News, for example, our apps work seamlessly with wearables with minimal work (see an example on Android Wear). As Apple, Android and Amazon push into living rooms, video apps naturally extend to TV sets with strong ties to mobile devices. In a similar fashion, digital displays in cars all run on apps, not browsers.


A year and a half ago, I urged newsrooms to aggressively invest in mobile to avoid — even profit — from the second disruption. Now the disruption is here, and while the mobile web is still important, apps are leading the growth curve on mobile and beyond. News organizations have to fight a battle on both fronts, realizing that good apps require a tremendously larger and more patient investment than a mobile-friendly site.  Similar to the first disruption, those who don’t invest enough will be left behind.
Tiffany Yeo's insight:

Although news organizations are investing more resources into websites as compared to mobile apps, the benefits these organizations gain are significantly lesser than those who invest into mobile apps. With many people increasingly using mobile apps to discover and explore issues in the world, it is obvious that the number of people who explore websites are declining. Due to its interactive nature, mobile apps are extremely useful as sharing of personal thoughts and opinions have become much easier and convenient. Efficient use of mobile apps can also allow one to further discover new insights of global news. I agree with the author that having a loyal app audience can have huge impacts on the online world, as sharing of information can help organizations increase their number of visitors. 

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