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Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Teaching Business Communication and Employment
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What Recruiters Look At During the 6 Seconds They Spend on a Resume

What Recruiters Look At During the 6 Seconds They Spend on a Resume | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it

Via Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines
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Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:42 PM

Although we may never know why we didn’t get chosen for a job interview, a recent study is shedding some light on recruiters’ decision-making behavior. According to TheLadders research, recruiters spend an average of ”six seconds before they make the initial ‘fit or no fit’ decision” on candidates. 


The study used a scientific technique called “eye tracking” on 30 professional recruiters and examined their eye movements during a 10-week period to “record and analyze where and how long someone focuses when digesting a piece of information or completing a task.”


In the short time that they spend with your resume, the study showed recruiters will look at your name, current title and company, current position start and end dates, previous title and company, previous position start and end dates, and education.


The two resumes below include a heat map of recruiters’ eye movements. The one on the right was looked at more thoroughly than the one of the left because of its clear and concise format.

Gina McLachlan's curator insight, November 5, 2013 4:23 PM

I need to share with Office Tech

Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Bibliobibuli
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Stoner: How the story of a failure became an all-out publishing success

Stoner: How the story of a failure became an all-out publishing success | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it
There is something you should have done in 1965, but likely didn’t. You had to have been old enough, of course; and of a certain sensibility, perhaps. And no, it didn’t involve sex. Or protest marches.

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Rescooped by Caroline Leary from The Funnily Enough
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Ten Things I’ve Learned from Evaluating Self-Published Books for a Year

Ten Things I’ve Learned from Evaluating Self-Published Books for a Year | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it

At Compulsion Reads, we always seek to help educate and inform writers. I believe that my personal experience of reading and evaluating a large amount of self-published books over the last year could lend some important insights to authors. This is something I would have liked to read when I was first getting started out on my own road to self-publishing.


Via mooderino
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Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Scriveners' Trappings
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The Impact of Writing on Our Brain ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

The Impact of Writing on Our Brain ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it

This graphic features some scientific facts about the impact of the act of writing on our brain. I find these facts and stats very enlightening and thought you might want to have a peek as well. Enjoy


Via CM Elias, Jim Lerman
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CM Elias's curator insight, December 1, 2013 9:19 AM

Writing is good for the brain? Somehow I already knew that... ;)

Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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A Note To Beginning Science Writers | Phenomena | National Geographic

From time to time, I get letters from people thinking seriously about becoming science writers. Some have no idea how to start; some have started but want to know how to get better. I usually respond with a hasty email, so that I can get back to figuring out for myself how to be a science writer. I thought it would be better for everyone—the people contacting me and myself—to sit down and write out a thorough response. (I’m also going to publish a final version of this on my web site, here.)

 

First a caveat: I am probably the wrong person to ask for this advice. I stumbled into this line of work without any proper planning in the early 1990s, when journalism was a very different industry. The answer to “How do I become a science writer?” is not equivalent to “How did you become a science writer?”

 

I was the sort of kid who wrote stories, cartoons, and failed imitations of Watership Down. By college, I was working on both fiction and nonfiction, majoring in English to learn from great writers while trying to avoid getting sucked into the self-annihilating maze of literary theory. After college, I spent a couple years at various jobs while writing short stories on my own, but I gradually realized I didn’t have enough in my brain yet to put on the page.

 

In 1989 I wrote to some magazines to see if they had any entry-level jobs. I got a response from a magazine called Discover, saying they needed an assistant copy editor. I got the job but turned out to be a less-than-perfect copy editor, which means that I was a terrible copy editor.

 

Fortunately, by then my editors had let me start to fact-check stories, which is arguably the best way to learn how to write about science. I got a chance to write short pieces, and I realized this was an experience unlike any previous writing I had done. I was writing about the natural world, but in nature I discovered strangeness beyond my own imagining. And scientists were willing to help me come to understand their discoveries. I stayed at Discover for ten years, the last four of which I was a senior editor there, and then headed out on my own, to write books, features, and other pieces.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Tracking the Future
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Andrew McAfee: Are droids taking our jobs?

Robots and algorithms are getting good at jobs like building cars, writing articles, translating -- jobs that once required a human. So what will we humans do for work? Andrew McAfee walks through recent labor data to say: We ain't seen nothing yet. But then he steps back to look at big history, and comes up with a surprising and even thrilling view of what comes next.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Cursive Writing - TimesLeaderOnline.com | News, Sports, Jobs and Community Info for Belmont County - Times Leader

Dear Editor, In response to Virginia Helms, St. Clairsville, regarding “cursive writing”: M.


Via Charles Tiayon
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Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Teaching Business Communication and Employment
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They Loved Your G.P.A. Then They Saw Your Tweets.

They Loved Your G.P.A. Then They Saw Your Tweets. | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it
More colleges are finding the social media posts of their applicants — and sometimes denying admission as a result.

Via Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines
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Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, November 9, 2013 5:08 PM

"At Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, admissions officers are still talking about the high school senior who attended a campus information session last year for prospective students. Throughout the presentation, she apparently posted disparaging comments on Twitter about her fellow attendees, repeatedly using a common expletive." . . .

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Why Learning through Social Networks Is the Future?

Why Learning through Social Networks Is the Future? | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it

Curating, managing, & promoting a PLN develops critical & creative learners with socio-emotional capabilities.

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They Loved Your G.P.A. Then They Saw Your Tweets.

They Loved Your G.P.A. Then They Saw Your Tweets. | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it
More colleges are finding the social media posts of their applicants — and sometimes denying admission as a result.

Via Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines
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Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, November 9, 2013 5:08 PM

"At Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, admissions officers are still talking about the high school senior who attended a campus information session last year for prospective students. Throughout the presentation, she apparently posted disparaging comments on Twitter about her fellow attendees, repeatedly using a common expletive." . . .

Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Scriveners' Trappings
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Redefining the Writing Process with iPads

Redefining the Writing Process with iPads | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it
Take a moment to think about how you learned to write. What steps did you go through? What was your process?

Most of us learned the same core set of skills on paper: organize, draft, edit, revise, t

Via Heather Peretz, John Purificati, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, seilts, Jim Lerman
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Yes, young writers have something to say | Flat Hat News

Yes, young writers have something to say | Flat Hat News | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it

Last month, 28-year-old Eleanor Catton became the youngest person ever to win the Man Booker Prize, which she was awarded for her novel “The Luminaries.” Veronica Roth is only 25, and started to write the bestselling “Divergent” series while still a student at Northwestern University. And Christopher Paolini famously became the bestselling author of the “Inheritance Cycle” at age 19.

Yet there has been some discussion regarding whether young writers can be interesting. The Huffington Post recently featured an article on the subject, in which writer Steven Petite shared how author Junot Diaz discouraged him from pursuing an MFA right after college. In order to devote so much time to writing, said Diaz, you first need to have some interesting life experiences. Experiences to write about. Experiences to inspire you.

As a creative writing student here at the College of William and Mary, I’ve heard similar comments. Professor Chelsey Johnson tells her students to work, explore the world, and do things before committing to a graduate school program. When Justin Torres, author of “We the Animals,” visited the College, he echoed these sentiments. Before giving all your time to writing, it’s good to work a few jobs. Better if they’re horrible jobs. More experiences, more clay to shape into art.


Via Charles Tiayon, KiwiBelma
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, November 5, 2013 1:18 AM

Last month, 28-year-old Eleanor Catton became the youngest person ever to win the Man Booker Prize, which she was awarded for her novel “The Luminaries.” Veronica Roth is only 25, and started to write the bestselling “Divergent” series while still a student at Northwestern University. And Christopher Paolini famously became the bestselling author of the “Inheritance Cycle” at age 19.

Yet there has been some discussion regarding whether young writers can be interesting. The Huffington Post recently featured an article on the subject, in which writer Steven Petite shared how author Junot Diaz discouraged him from pursuing an MFA right after college. In order to devote so much time to writing, said Diaz, you first need to have some interesting life experiences. Experiences to write about. Experiences to inspire you.

As a creative writing student here at the College of William and Mary, I’ve heard similar comments. Professor Chelsey Johnson tells her students to work, explore the world, and do things before committing to a graduate school program. When Justin Torres, author of “We the Animals,” visited the College, he echoed these sentiments. Before giving all your time to writing, it’s good to work a few jobs. Better if they’re horrible jobs. More experiences, more clay to shape into art.

Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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From 1Cent to 100$ online writing and more

From 1Cent to 100$ online writing and more | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it
Just how many online writers have earned more than 100$. And how many are making more money writing online than people working on nine to five jobs, I wonder?

Via Charles Tiayon
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Rescooped by Caroline Leary from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
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How To Be Hilarious On Twitter, From A Writer Who Tweeted Her Way To TV

How To Be Hilarious On Twitter, From A Writer Who Tweeted Her Way To TV | Journalism jobs in writing | Scoop.it
When a veteran stand-up comic is also funny on Twitter, it doesn’t exactly come as a shock. When an unknown phenom makes you physically choke on guffaws, though, it’s a revelation and also something of an extended audition.

 

...After catching the attention of the comedy cognoscenti in 2010, the then recent Harvard graduate soon got jobs writing on the Oscars and Disney’sA.N.T. Farm., before moving to a staff writer position at NBC’s ensemble sitcom Parks and Recreation. (The show was just renewed for a sixth season.) The in-demand writer is also an accomplished poet who’s writing asatirical guide to science for ladies.

 

Megan Amram’s frothy blend of dark humor and smart, surreal silliness has found more than 356,000 followers on Twitter so far. Although not everybody trying to generate laughs online is doing so for the same reasons, or with the same twisted flair, Amram’s consistent comedic quality is enviable for anyone trying to make their mark with brief bursts of humor. The multidiscipline writer recently spoke with Co.Create about puns, poetry, and how to be funny on Twitter altogether....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Aleatha Shepley's curator insight, May 21, 2013 11:39 PM

That's funny

Two Pens's curator insight, May 23, 2013 2:37 PM

Anyone who thinks you can't make a reputation on Twitter is hiding one's head under the ostrich and the earth. 

Emily at Two Pens's curator insight, May 23, 2013 3:04 PM

She's an accomplished poet, too!