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Scoop.it est EFFECTIVEMENT la meilleure place sur le WEB à mes yeux.
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Rescooped by Philippe Trebaul from Geography Education
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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | JOIN SCOOP.IT AND FOLLOW ME ON SCOOP.IT | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."


Tagsmapping, historical, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
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Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:01 AM

This made, created in 1861, shows the relevant amounts of slavery occurring throughout that year. The map shades counties based on the percentage of total inhabitants who were enslaved. Though this map was simple, it showed the relationship between states commitments to slavery and their enthusiasm about secession, making a visual argument about Confederate motivations. President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map is a great representation of slavery that amounted during the 1860's.

Rescooped by Philippe Trebaul from green infographics
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Infographic: Watch a City's Pulse in Real-Time

Infographic: Watch a City's Pulse in Real-Time | JOIN SCOOP.IT AND FOLLOW ME ON SCOOP.IT | Scoop.it
A new way of collecting data allows a duo of creative coders to archive transit information and update the map every hour, creating a handy tool for trend spotting and comparing traffic.


The first time Andy Woodruff and Tim Wallace created a map of Boston’s bus routes was back in the fall of 2011. Using data from the MBTA, the duo (who write over at Boston-centric blog, Bostonography, charted the paths and speeds of buses over the course of 24 hours.

In the years since they first published the MBTA Bus Speeds, the team has learned better ways to automate mapping. Now, with a bit of coding they can sit back and watch the maps draw themselves. Woodruff and Wallace pull in data from NextBus every hour, and that information is stored in a database. “Image rendering is done by some pretty simple PHP scripts that grab the data, string the points together into lines based on vehicle ID, calculate distances and speeds, then draw thousands of lines.”


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Philippe Trebaul from Geography Education
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What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps?

What Do We Mean by 'Reading' Maps? | JOIN SCOOP.IT AND FOLLOW ME ON SCOOP.IT | Scoop.it
The common-core standards present an ambiguous message on how to draw information from maps and charts, Phil Gersmehl says.

Via Seth Dixon
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mufidmmn's comment, July 24, 2013 4:08 AM
ngapain itu ya
Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:38 PM

This is a resource i feel would be relevant to those students who struggle to be egaged in their reading

This can be used on readers on many different level

the reading maps foccus on language arts, Its description is communicated through charts, graphs, and maps intead of normal paragraphs and text

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 11:19 AM
I feel the skill of reading a map is very important, but it becoming less prevalent in classrooms. Teachers may find it more difficult to teach and therefore are not going in depth with it. I remember as a child in grade school we would color maps or have to find where the states are. We never were taught how to fully understand the uses of a map and all the different ways they are used and how to read them. It is becoming a lost skill in a world that needs to be more appreciative of geography.