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Rescooped by Philippe Trebaul from Geography Education
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The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery

The Map That Lincoln Used to See the Reach of Slavery | JOIN SCOOP.IT AND FOLLOW ME ON SCOOP.IT | Scoop.it

"Historian Susan Schulten writes in her book Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-Century America that during the 1850s many abolitionists used maps to show slavery's historical development and to illustrate political divisions within the South. (You can see many of those maps on the book’s companion website.)  Schulten writes that President Lincoln referred to this particular map often, using it to understand how the progress of emancipation might affect Union troops on the ground. The map (hi-res) even appears in the familiar Francis Bicknell Carpenter portrait First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln, visible leaning against a wall in the lower right-hand corner of the room."


Tagsmapping, historical, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
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Expert's comment, September 25, 2013 10:09 PM
good maps http://www.skoyun.com/oyunlar/oyunskor
Anna & Lexi 's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:18 AM

I chose this scoop because it relates to slavery, and slavery has something to do with economics. It also has to do with social. This map was used by Lincoln to see the reach of slavery. TOPIC: social

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:13 AM

Great historical map of the population density of enslaved people during the 1850s. I would like to see this map with a side by side of the poulation density of modern day african americans. I think they would be very similar due to many people not wanting to leave their culture and tradtion behind. Another little thing i found interesting on this map is where the slaves were the most populated such as along the mississippi and coastal carolinas. This is from the farms having to use massive amounts of water to run and whats better than being right on the water.

Rescooped by Philippe Trebaul from green infographics
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Tour the Country’s Energy Infrastructure Through A New Interactive Map

Tour the Country’s Energy Infrastructure Through A New Interactive Map | JOIN SCOOP.IT AND FOLLOW ME ON SCOOP.IT | Scoop.it

Examining the network of power plants, transmission wires, and pipelines gives new insights into the inner workings of the electrical grid.


Every time you switch on a light, charge your electronics or heat your home in the winter, you’re relying upon a tremendous network of energy infrastructure that literally stretches across the country: power plants, pipelines, transmission wires and storage facilities.

It can be hard to visualize all this infrastructure and understand how it makes abundant energy available throughout the country. To help see a bigger picture, a new map, just released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, combines a range of data (locations of power plants, electricity lines, natural gas pipelines, refineries, storage facilities and more) into an elegant, interactive interface that helps to piece how it all fits together. You can also zoom in on your own city to see the types of power plants generating electricity nearby.

The map also includes layers of real-time information on storm movement and risks, allowing energy analysts to better understand the potential impact of storms.


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, July 30, 2013 1:32 PM

Understanding the grid in real time is somewhat facilitated by this new interactive map.

Rescooped by Philippe Trebaul from green infographics
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Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data

Visualizing 100 Years Of Climate Data | JOIN SCOOP.IT AND FOLLOW ME ON SCOOP.IT | Scoop.it

What does 100 years worth of climate data look like when rendered in an interactive, color-coded map? A continental tug-of-war between red (for heat) and blue (for cold), as seasons come and go and cold air replaces the warm.

The infographic is the work of data visualization studio Halftone, whose principals originally pursued the idea of making a map to visualize data about coffee production against key environmental factors, like temperature and precipitation.


"Our goal with this project was not to facilitate precise analysis, but to expose how every single month produces a unique and beautiful artwork through our Voronoi tessellated approximation of a heat map," write the creators. "The underlying map of satellite imagery and major geographic features adds a second layer for exploration."


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Philippe Trebaul from green infographics
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NOAA's new interactive map shows all the vegetation on the planet

NOAA's new interactive map shows all the vegetation on the planet | JOIN SCOOP.IT AND FOLLOW ME ON SCOOP.IT | Scoop.it

Thanks to the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite, NOAA has put together an incredible interactive map of the world's greenery, we can now see to an amazing degree of detail which parts of the planet is covered in green and which are bare.

The map is thanks to the ability of the satellite to collect 2 TB of data every week -- and that's only the portion of data collected for the vegetation index...


Via Lauren Moss
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alistairm 's curator insight, June 24, 2013 3:54 AM

I'm hoping we'll see seasonal changes too! Great potential for looking at conservation issues, biodiversity, urban encroachment etc

Steve Mattison's curator insight, July 19, 2013 9:36 AM

It is a lot greener than you would think considering all the slash and burn hype the media puts out.