Jessica's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Jessica's A Midsummer Night's Dream
Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Nights Dream"
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Literary Criticism- "This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream

Literary Criticism- "This Sport Well Carried Shall Be Chronicled": Puck as Trickster in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Jessica's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Jessica Blakemore's insight:

It is questioned within the criticism Puck's role as a trickster. It's noticed that his actions only sometimes, match those of a trickster. And it is assumed that as a trickster one would continuously be sneaky, unpredictable, and unreliable. Yet in A Midsummer Night's Dream, Puck does not flaunt these classic traits, in fact, as the reader, we barley witness them. Not to say that Puck doesn't enjoy playing tricks and messing with mortals’ minds, but it can be argued that he portrays more of a gentle fairy over the sly, devious fairy he was intended to be. Throughout the play are specific instances where Puck is seen to have helped mortals, been reliable to Oberon, and predictable with his "pranks." Oberon even refers to him as "My gentle trickster." However Puck in not completely stripped of his trickster title in this criticism. His classic pranks involving scaring the towns people, misleading the mortals, etc. do not go unnoticed, yet are described as common and unoriginal for a trickster. The author of the article successfully discusses valid points against Puck's role as a trickster and Shakespeare's originality in creating this character.

 

"Infobase Learning - Login." Bloom's Literary Reference Online. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Feb. 2013. <http://www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?ItemID=WE54&gt;.

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Source- Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter

Source- Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter | Jessica's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Jessica Blakemore's insight:

"A thousand years ago, he was the devil himself." As a mischievous shape-shifting fairy, Puck in A Midsummer Night's Dream, is constantly causing trouble, torturing, and tricking harmless people. This commonly heard of fairy, originally known as Puki, Pooka and Pwca, often appeared to innocent people offering to help, and then often misleading them to their death or an inconvenient situation. Within the play, Shakespeare's interpretation of Puck was also combined with another well-known Elizabethan shape-shifter; Robin Good-Fellow. Just like Puck, Robin was known for his pranks, however had seemed to have a softer side which involved him actually helping some people once in a while. Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream is the first to have combined both of these harmful intentioned creatures to form one character. It is stated within the play, that Puck the fairy is often out causing trouble to the towns people appearing to be something he's not. This description of Puck creates a clear view on how Shakespeare's idea for this character may have developed.

 

 

This source was able to form the connection between Puck's characteristics and the myths about him. He was known in myths to have tricked helpless people, which is exactly what he does in A Midsummer Night's Dream. With Robin Good-Fellow having practically the same traits at Puck, it is understandable why Shakespeare combined them to form a single character. All questions behind the reasons for Puck's mischievous actions in the play were answered through this article describing the background of the mythical fairy Puck.

 

Riley, Dick, and Pam McAllister. "Puck: Shakespeare's Shape-Shifter." Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion To Shakespeare (2001): 77-78. Literary Reference Center. Web. 9 Feb. 2013.

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Mickey Mouse - Midsummer Night's Dream

Jessica Blakemore's insight:

(4:05-6:26)

 

This clip is both a modern and playful interpretation of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. It is able to clearly as well as accurately translate the script of the play. This take on the play portrays the famous Disney cartoon characters (Mickey mouse, Donald Duck etc.) as the also famous Shakespearean characters in A Midsummer Night's Dream. This Disney remake does in fact make the play easier to understand just by the use of modern language. This version is successful in informing the viewer of all the details Shakespeare himself included in the play write, however in a more comprehensible manner.

 

 

This video is able to help me clearly grasp the plot/concept behind A Midsummer Night's Dream without the Elizabethan language confusing me. The idea of the play is represented entirely, just with a change in the language. Sometimes with Shakespearean plays or other Elizabethan literature, all it takes is a more modern language to get the point of the piece across.

 

"Mickey Mouse - Midsummer Night's Dream." YouTube. YouTube, 19 Jan. 2012. Web. 04 Feb. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olValphzGhA&gt;.

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Cassandra Cavallaro's comment, March 7, 2013 5:28 PM
I really love that your video was able to find an easier way to portray Shakespeare and clarify the plot line!
Jessica Blakemore's comment, March 7, 2013 5:39 PM
Oh thanks! I thought it was an easier was to grasp the concept of each scene.
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Photo- Titania and The Young Boy

Photo- Titania and The Young Boy | Jessica's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Jessica Blakemore's insight:

The image above captures Titania; the fairy queen, looking after the young boy whom she and Oberon are fighting for. Just by looking at the picture you can tell that Titania is protecting him, specifically from Oberon who wishes the boy become his slave. Through this image you can see the love and protection she has for this boy and how she plans to care for him like her own. It is evident that Titania plans on keeping the promise she made to the boy's mother and that is to love, care, and protect him from all harm in their world.

 

Titania, Costume Design for "A Midsummer Night's Dream" N.d. Photograph. Google. Web. 13 Feb. 2013. <http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&gt;.

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Michaela Brodeur's comment, March 10, 2013 9:15 PM
I like how you describe the relationship between Titania and the boy in this image, I agree with what your saying!
Diane Newberry's comment, March 13, 2013 11:03 PM
Michaela, I completely agree with you. Titania obviously felt very maternal toward the boy, and I think this picture captures it well. The only problem I had with the play was the fact that Oberon ends up getting the boy as a slave and Titania was not able to protect him. It seems like a small, overlooked tragedy amid all the farce and light-hardheartedness of the rest of the play.
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Historical Article- All the World's a Stage--Elizabethan Drama

Historical Article- All the World's a Stage--Elizabethan Drama | Jessica's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Jessica Blakemore's insight:

This historical article is able to clearly discuss theater in the Elizabethan era. Much of the drama performed in the Elizabethan era was said to be solely based upon the lives of Elizabethan people themselves. Each performance consisted of a cast made up of only male actors, "costumes that were historically inaccurate, “and once in a while, an unoriginal plot. Many of the theaters contained a special seating area, the pit, for groundlings and others of that social strata. It was not uncommon to find the audience verbally interacting with the actors, cheering and shouting "boo's” when appropriate. It is concluded that theater in the Elizabethan era is far from what you would see in a theater today.

 

 

In connection to "A Midsummer Night's Dream," the article is able to clarify the reasoning behind the all-male cast of the performance of "Pyramis and Thisbe." It also prepares me on what to expect out of the audience during this performance, considering they were usually very interactive with the actors.

 

Riley, Dick, and Pam McAllister. "All The World's A Stage--Elizabethan Drama." Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion To Shakespeare (2001): 13-18. Literary Reference Center. Web. 2 Feb. 2013.

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