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Trend— Tying college and university presidential compensation to performance measures

Trend— Tying college and university presidential compensation to performance measures | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it

It’s not just presidents who are being held to performance measures to get bonuses and raises. Nineteen percent of provosts and 18 percent of chief financial officers at private universities and colleges are, too, Yaffe & Company reports. In Texas, the new incentive pay plan includes vice chancellors.


Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

I find it kind of troubling that college presidents have there salary partially based on the graduation rates of students. especially since students come and go, but a president can't MAKE them staqy, when someone wants to leave a college they will because it is a descision made by a person, I find this to be important because If I end up going to a college that does this I dont want to be swayed to stay for some other persons salary

 

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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, January 7, 2014 3:04 PM

The landscape of higher ed reveals a trend toward higher ed executive, especially presidential,  bonuses tied to measures of performance such as cost savings, growth in research grants, fundraising, graduation rates and more. This resource examines that trend using, as a case study, John O’Donnell, president of Massachusetts Bay Community College.

  • Patrick Callan of National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. The process appears to be undertaken “just to justify extravagant salaries, or is way too focused on fundraising. “In other cases, ‘it’s like they put the presidents on trial,’ and every constituency — faculty, donors, students — is invited to weigh in. That’s just a killer. It creates presidents who won’t take risks.’”
  • Dennis P. Jones of  National Center for Higher Education Management (NCHEMS), a frequent SCUP speaker: “It all goes to the idea of putting money behind the goals you’re trying to achieve. If that’s more graduates, let’s pay for graduates. If it’s something else, let’s pay for that.”
  • Stephen Pollack of consulting firm Mercer: “Corporate concepts are just starting to drift into academia, and they have to. Institutions can’t afford not to have competent people in these jobs.”
  • From Community College Daily www.ccdaily.com by Rebecca Trounson/Hechinger Report.
  • Tags: Presidents, Leadership, Resource and Budget Planning, Compensation
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College applications shortchanged under schools' counselor cuts - Philly.com

College applications shortchanged under schools' counselor cuts - Philly.com | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it
Philly.com College applications shortchanged under schools' counselor cuts Philly.com And at Academy at Palumbo, a magnet school in South Philadelphia, some college applications have been submitted late because the single counselor for 800 students...
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

this may or may not effect me, but if this type of cut reaches Everett high school any time in the next month. counceling services have been cut in serveral schools around the country. the problem seems to be that they are letting councelors go because of school budget cuts. I think the schools should not cut counceling services first though because it can lower chances of students getting the help they need to apply to certain things and get into college.

 

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Federal Debt Collectors Get Tough with College Grads - The ...

Federal Debt Collectors Get Tough with College Grads - The ... | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it
As student debt is elevated to a nation crisis, the feds have become very aggressive—some might say abusive—about fighting bankruptcy cases from distressed borrowers. This has touched off a debate on whether the ...
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

this shows that that while the student debt is going up, the median income of a 4 year college graduate is going down. it puts in persepective that you have to be careful with what you do after college. because that graph shows a large gap inbetween debt and income, which means you will most likely be in the red if you are average.

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Sublime Text: A Premier Programming Text Editor - CodeFear

Sublime Text: A Premier Programming Text Editor - CodeFear | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it
Sublime Text is one such tool that you should possess as a programmer or coder. Its price may be on the higher side when compared to other text editors.
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

another upcoming program that would be a good thing to learn if I were to go into the programming field, it is a newer text editor which makes coding easier, this is an enhanced coding program which takes little stresses out of the coding part. so If I went to college for programming, I would want to think about learning this in some way.

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Rescooped by Jeremy Daniel Haubrich from School Library Advocacy
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Information Literacy Resources | Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL)

These resources will help you understand and apply the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education to enhance teaching, learning, and research in the higher education community.


Via Karen Bonanno
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

this is a website I can use for future reference. when I see this website, it reminds me of a different version of WOIS, which we used a lot in senior seminar earlier this year, this website is a database of scholarships, and also college information, all while you can get in confernces and and ask about what happens after college and that kind of thing

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Looking for a college major? How about drone technology | USA TODAY

Looking for a college major? How about drone technology | USA TODAY | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it

In March, 47-year-old Stephen Myers ditched the information technology company that he built from the ground-up and went back to school.

 

His choice of study? Drone technology. He's now earning a specialized degree from the Unmanned Vehicle University in Arizona. Myers is taking an online course on how to control a drone's sensors and electronics, and he hopes to build a new commercial drone business.

 

"I think that something a lot of people don't understand is that when people think of UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles), they think of drones spying on them," said Myers, who lives in Naples, FL. "What they don't realize or what they don't understand are all the other applications."

 

Drones are already being tested by companies like Amazon, who hope to use them to deliver packages, and Dominos in the United Kingdom even wants to deliver pizza. "There is almost no industry that you can not think of that can benefit from UAVs," said Myers.


The Federal Aviation Administration just this week named six teams across the nation that will host the development and testing of drones to fly safely in the same skies as commercial airliners.

 

The announcement represents a major milestone toward the goal of sharing the skies by the end of 2015, in what is projected to become an industry worth billions of dollars. But technical hurdles and privacy concerns remain in a regulatory program that's already a year behind schedule.

 

Myers launched his previous IT career two decades ago during a time when computers were revolutionizing the world. Now, he's getting ready for a new digital revolution.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

since my senior project is fairly loose ended in the fact I still dont exactly know where I am going or what I am doing, I enjoy seeing articles like this. this article show the importance of UAV's. because when people think of drones they most likely think about spying and bombing, where there is so many application of drones we can use in every day life. this article shows that if you dont really have a major in mind, it is worth looking into drone technology because of the upcoming demand

 

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Josh Lungstrom's curator insight, January 6, 2014 1:23 PM

While I don't plan on going to school for drone technology. This article still speaks to me in that you can change what you want to do even in the middle of your life. If I got to school to become a mechanic, I don't have to be a mechanic the rest of my life.

Dylan Ostrander's curator insight, January 13, 2014 12:55 AM

I found this article scoopworthy because it shows that you shouldn't limit yourself to a certain field of study, after no matter how much time. Myers was working on his career for decades, and then decided to change and get a degree in something else. It's a statement showing that you should always follow your dreams, even if they constantly change. 

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c++ programming video tutorials -37- building a function to work on range of array values - YouTube

This video tutorial explains how to create a function which works on range of array values using pointers in c++. You will learn how to pass the array elemen...
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

my mother being an IT at a government agency has taught me alot, especially what I would want to know if I decided to go into the programming field. my mother uses C++, C+, and  java on a daily basis, and she always tells me the importance of learning this if I go into the computer field. this video is a basic tutorial on how to make a function with pointers. but the whole series teaches you a lot of the basic elements of C++

 

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Texas repels creationist threat to biology textbooks - life - 31 December 2013 - New Scientist

Texas repels creationist threat to biology textbooks - life - 31 December 2013 - New Scientist | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it
Children in Texas will use biology textbooks free from anti-evolution propaganda, but the portion of US Republicans supporting evolution has fallen (Texas repels creationist threat to biology textbooks: Children in Texas will use biology textbooks...
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

I find it interesting that considering howe right wing texas is, they are trying to stop all anti evolution "propaganda" in textbooks at public schools. even though 33 percent of a 2000 person group rejected evolution (small number) but I feel removing anti-evolution is a good thing concidering evolution is basically the norm in public schools today, regardless on beliefs

 

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Expert will speak on college-bound culture - TheNewsTribune.com

Expert will speak on college-bound culture - TheNewsTribune.com | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it
Expert will speak on college-bound culture
TheNewsTribune.com
Tacoma Public Schools will host national education expert Mychal Wynn in two talks on how the community can create a college-bound culture for all local students.
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

Tacoma Public Schools will host national education expert Mychal Wynn in two talks on how the community can create a college-bound culture for all local students. The author and educator will share his message, “It’s All About Strategy: Creating a College-Bound Culture – A Framework for Increasing Student Achievement,” to parents, students and educators. the talks are free and It may be a good thing to attend these



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eScholarship | University of California

eScholarship | University of California | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it

eScholarship provides Open-Access scholarly publishing services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic research platform to scholars worldwide. Powered by the California Digital Library.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

this can be very useful. The university of California has adopted a new open access policy. because All material published or disseminated by eScholarship is available worldwide, free of cost, to researchers and the general public. The University of California provides this open access digital publishing service to its community through the eScholarship program as a means of increasing the reach and visibility of the scholarly work produced by UC-affiliated faculty, researchers, and graduate students.

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, January 5, 2014 6:13 PM

The University of California has added a new, free, open access e-library. Thank you and I hope this trend continues globally!

Deborah Banker's curator insight, January 6, 2014 10:26 AM

Wow!  

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The Problem with Time and Time Zones in Programming

The Problem with Time and Time Zones in Programming | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it
Most of us have probably never given much thought to all the work that goes into the 'time and time zone' part of programming, but it can turn out to be a real nightmare. YouTube channel Computerphile discusses this 'painful' ...
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

This is a video about how complicated time zones can be in programming. because when you have to add multiple different time zones. because daylight saving is different for each country. and some countries even skip days, so time zones are the bayne of programmers. countries change their time zones just because too. this shows that if I go into programming, I would need to take something or do some independent.research on how too deal with time zones.

 

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Microsoft's Midori operating system project moves forward, spawns ...

Microsoft's Midori operating system project moves forward, spawns ... | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it
Microsoft's Midori operating system project moves forward, spawns M# programming languageWritten by Ron on December 31, 2013 - 12:52PM. Microsoft's Midori operating system project moves forward, spawns M# programming language.
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

I find this interesting and I may be able to use this in the future if I become a computer programmer, because If I went to college and learned programming in todays tech language, it might be obsolete in a few years. this can be used because I can postpone taking a certain programming skill like C+ or C#. or take just the manditory ones while I wait for lessons on this new M# to be implimented

 

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Looking for Your First Job in 2014? Here's Some Advice From HubSpotters [SlideShare]

Looking for Your First Job in 2014? Here's Some Advice From HubSpotters [SlideShare] | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it
Graduating this year? Here's some great career and job search advice from us HubSpotters! (#marketing Looking for Your First Job in 2014?
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

this an article for the 99% of college seniors leaving college without a job planned for afterwards, this can be very useful to me in a couple years when I graduate. so this is personal advice from the hubspot curators to graduating college students with some basic advice like being the first there and the last to leave, or resumes dont matter unless their bad. so this can be a reference to me when I am finishing up my college education

 

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As Schools Give Students Computers, Price of L.A.'s Program ...

As Schools Give Students Computers, Price of L.A.'s Program ... | Jeremy's CE research | Scoop.it
The Perris Union High School District is paying $344 apiece for a Chromebook for every student. Nearby, Riverside Unified purchased a variety of devices, including the Kindle Fire and iPad Mini, for as low as $150 each.
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

school are purchasing chrombooks and tablets for every student. and to some extent for relatively cheap. as low as $150 per device (more than half off) the devices are to try to get the students more engaged in learning, and while the idea is good. I feel as if puting electronic devices like this in high schoolers hands just means they will be put off track and get distracted more easily. other schools are trying to buy or lease more cost effective computers but they still hold the same impact. which I think is a better idea in general

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Physical state of hydronium

ANSWER: This is a bit touchy. The problem is that a bare proton, $ce{H^+}$, won't exist in water. It attracts electrons too strongly (#fact: Physical state of hydronium - ANSWER: This is a bit touchy.
Jeremy Daniel Haubrich's insight:

since I am thinking heavily about going into the natural science. it would be important for me too know about this kind of thing. I have already learned a little about hydronium in AP chem, but this is new information to me, saying that bare protons attract electrons so strongly that it becomes H3O (hydronium) so instead of H+ in water It will more likely be H3O+ but they are pretty much the same thing

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