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Europe's key animals 'recovering'

Europe's key animals 'recovering' | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Some of Europe's key animals have made a comeback over the past 50 years, a report suggests.
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Hackers crack major data firms, sell info to ID thieves, says report

Hackers crack major data firms, sell info to ID thieves, says report | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

A hacker run identity-theft service called SSNDOB -- as in Social Security Number and date of birth -- compromised servers at several major US data brokers, according to a report.

The affected data brokers included several large data brokers in the United States, including LexisNexis, Dun & Bradstreet, and Kroll Background America.

 

LexisNexis maintains one of the world's biggest electronic databases for legal and public-records related information; Dun & Bradstreet licenses info on businesses for use in credit decisions; and Kroll -- now a part of HireRight -- provides services related to employment background, drug, and health screenings.

 

"All three victim companies said they are working with federal authorities and third-party forensics firms in the early stages of determining how far the breaches extend, and whether indeed any sensitive information was accessed and exfiltrated from their networks," according to Brian Krebs, who writes a security blog.

 

Krebs, who got his hands on a copy of SSNDOB's database, reported that a closer examination of it indicates that since SSNDOB came on the scene early last year, the service has sold more than 1.02 million unique SSNs and nearly 3.1 million date of birth records to buyers in the crimeworld.


Via Amigo Omega
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Eric Christenson's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:00 PM

t really news here..

 

Eric Christenson's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:01 PM

NOT really news here

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NASA's Innovative Ion Space Thruster Sets Endurance World Record

NASA's Innovative Ion Space Thruster Sets Endurance World Record | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

A five-year test of NASA's latest ion drive for future spacecraft has set a new world record for the longest single space engine test.

 

The space agency's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) project completed a continuous test the ion engine for more than 48,000 hours — over five and a half years — longer than any other space propulsion system ever tested. With low fuel weight and long-running efficiency, ion engines have become strong contenders for deep space missions.

 

Spacecraft traveling through miles of space require energy to keep moving. Ion propulsion engines can help to minimize the bulkiness of fuel, allowing for increased scientific exploration in smaller packages. Over the course of nearly six years, NEXT consumed only 1,900 pounds (860 kilograms) of fuel, compared to the 22,000 pounds (10,000 kg) a conventional rocket would burn to create the same momentum.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dominik Bláha's curator insight, September 25, 2013 2:42 PM

I don't understand physics but this is interesting after seeing all that sci-fi movies. And this is real!

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Recycled Yahoo email addresses still receiving messages for previous owners - passwords included

Recycled Yahoo email addresses still receiving messages for previous owners - passwords included | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Yahoo has been recycling old email addresses to put desirable account names back into circulation, much to the delight of users like "johnsmith4737."

But some new owners are receving all sorts o...
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China's new phase of panda diplomacy

China's new phase of panda diplomacy | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
For half a century China used pandas to foster links with other countries, now the practice is entering a new phase, researchers say.
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iOS 7: users destroy iPhones after fake waterproof advert - Telegraph

iOS 7: users destroy iPhones after fake waterproof advert - Telegraph | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
A spoof advert suggesting Apple's new iOS 7 operating system made handsets waterproof appears to have fooled some users into destroying their iPhones.
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Social Media Investigations, Part 1: Down the Rabbit Hole

Social Media Investigations, Part 1: Down the Rabbit Hole | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
In today's vast social media universe, it's tougher than ever for investigators to ferret out evidence pertinent to their cases. Here's how to get started.
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Curiosity finding reduces hopes of finding life on Mars

Curiosity finding reduces hopes of finding life on Mars | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover has detected no methane on Mars after more than a year of extensive testing of the planet's atmosphere. Its absence throws into ...
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Microsoft lures punters to hybrid storage cloud with free storage arrays

Microsoft lures punters to hybrid storage cloud with free storage arrays | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Spend on Azure, get StorSimple box at the low, low price of $0
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Goodbye Big Bang, hello black hole? A new theory of the universe's creation

Goodbye Big Bang, hello black hole? A new theory of the universe's creation | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Could the famed 'Big Bang' theory need a revision? A group of theoretical physicists suppose the birth of the universe could have happened after a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole and ejected debris.
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Water-shedding surfaces can be made to last

Water-shedding surfaces can be made to last | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Steam condensation is key to the worldwide production of electricity and clean water: It is part of the power cycle that drives 85 percent of all electricity-generating plants and about half of all desalination plants globally, according to the...
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Scientists find life coming to Earth from space - News releases - News - The University of Sheffield

Scientists find life coming to Earth from space - News releases - News - The University of Sheffield | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
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Real climate science the IPCC doesn’t want you to see

Real climate science the IPCC doesn’t want you to see | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Guest essay by Paul Driessen Once again, it’s the NIPCC versus the IPCC – facts versus gloom-and-doom assertions. Earth’s average atmospheric temperatures haven’t increased in almost 17 years. It’s...
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Data-stealing botnets found in major public record holders' servers

Data-stealing botnets found in major public record holders' servers | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Servers at Lexis-Nexis, Dun & Bradstreet, and Kroll Background America/HireRight show up in the dashboard of a small, effective botnet run by a service that sells vital personal information on...
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Unsolved phenomenum: Why a Voltage-Generated Water Bridge Doesn't Collapse

Unsolved phenomenum: Why a Voltage-Generated Water Bridge Doesn't Collapse | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

If you apply an electric voltage across two water-filled beakers and separate them, something strange happens: The water stretches from beaker to beaker, creating a bridge that defies gravity. Water bridges were discovered 120 years ago, but no one has ever been sure why they do not collapse. One theory is that the voltage makes the water molecules line up, creating a “dielectric” tension that stops the bridge from falling. Another argues that surface tension—the tendency of a water’s surface to shrink inwards—keeps the bridge aloft.

 

Now, researchers believe that water bridges rely on both strategies. Reza Namin at the Sharif University of Technology in Tehran and colleagues measured various parameters across the length of a water bridge, including voltage, current, and bridge diameter. Then they plugged the data into a computer simulation to calculate the forces involved. The results, to be published next month in Physical Review E, reveal that dielectric tension and surface tension each carry about half a water bridge’s weight. The results, the researchers believe, could help engineers develop electrowetting, a method of using electricity to adjust the adhesion of fluids to a screen that is expected to be used in the next generation of e-book readers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Fake reviews land SEO companies in hot water

Fake reviews land SEO companies in hot water | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
They've flooded Yelp and other consumer review sites with puffery, and now they have to pay, to the tune of $350,000.
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Siri offers the latest backdoor into your iPhone - just ask nicely!

Siri offers the latest backdoor into your iPhone - just ask nicely! | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
We really didn't want to write another Apple iOS 7 story.

But with reports surfacing that HAL's smooth-talking stepsister Siri lets you *talk* your way into a locked iPhone, we couldn't help it.
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Teen privacy "eviscerated" by planned Facebook changes

Teen privacy "eviscerated" by planned Facebook changes | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
A coalition of US groups that advocate for teenagers is crying foul over proposed changes to Facebook policy that would rubber-stamp the use of teenagers' names, images and personal information to...
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Unbelievable moment a golden eagle swoops on a deer and flies off with

Unbelievable moment a golden eagle swoops on a deer and flies off with | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
The audacious attack was recorded by a camera trap in the Lazovsky region of south-east Russia. Experts believe such an attack has never been photographed before.
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Forget good cop, bad cop - here's the real psychology of two-person interrogation

Forget good cop, bad cop - here's the real psychology of two-person interrogation | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
In a new study Samantha Mann and her colleagues tested the effect of the demeanour of the note-taking interviewer.
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Java updates too much of a bother? Maybe online banking's just not for you

Java updates too much of a bother? Maybe online banking's just not for you | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
There's a Trojan that's got your number, and it's calling its chums to clean you out
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Car clocked 20 miles in 52 years

Car clocked 20 miles in 52 years | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
A classic 1961 car with just 20 miles on the clock and its original £15 tax disc is to be sold in Norfolk.
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33rd Square | Common Gene Between Cancer and Aging Identified

33rd Square | Common Gene Between Cancer and Aging Identified | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
A gene that helps control the ageing process by acting as a cell's internal clock has been linked to cancer by a major new study.
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Anti-Viral Drugs May Soon Be Available With DRACO

Anti-Viral Drugs May Soon Be Available With DRACO | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
By targeting virus-infected cells rather than the viruses themselves, researchers are closer than ever to developing treatments for a broad range of viruses from the common cold to deadly Ebola.

 

For many bacterial infections, antibiotic treatments such as penicillin are more than adequate. However, such drugs are useless against viral infections, including influenza, the common cold, and deadly hemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola.

Now, in a development that could transform how viral infections are treated, a team of researchers at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory has designed a drug that can identify cells that have been infected by any type of virus, then kill those cells to terminate the infection.

In a recent paper, the researchers tested their drug against 15 viruses, and found it was effective against all of them — including rhinoviruses that cause the common cold, H1N1 influenza, a stomach virus, a polio virus, dengue fever and several other types of hemorrhagic fever. The drug works by targeting a type of RNA produced only in cells that have been infected by viruses. “In theory, it should work against all viruses,” says Todd Rider, a senior staff scientist in Lincoln Laboratory’s Chemical, Biological, and Nanoscale Technologies Group who invented the new technology.

The concept for DRACO went like this: "It just occurred to me one day in the shower: oh, well, let's cross-wire these two to connect the successful detection of the long double-strand RNA with the successful final activation of suicide in the infected cells." Translated, Rider’s plan involved two parts. First, he knew that certain proteins could detect double-strand RNA, or dsRNA. The "D" in DRACO, dsRNA is found in almost all viruses (a strain of hantavirus is among those that don't), but not in healthy cells — it’s a near-perfect marker. But viruses shut down most responses to dsRNA; likewise, they disable another natural pathway inside cells, one that causes apoptosis, or cell death. Rider thought if he could combine the two, he’d have a viable method, one that detected dsRNA-containing cells and then caused them to commit cellular suicide.


Because the technology is so broad-spectrum, it could potentially also be used to combat outbreaks of new viruses, such as the 2003 SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) outbreak, Rider says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Mach 8 Scramjet flies but sends no data

Mach 8 Scramjet flies but sends no data | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
$14 million burned as rocket flies but doesn't ignite
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