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Achilles' heel to lower defenses of antibiotic-resistant bacteria found

Achilles' heel to lower defenses of antibiotic-resistant bacteria found | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UAE) in England have uncovered an Achille's heel in the cell defenses of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that co...
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Discovery of new molecule suggests origins of life may reside in interstellar space

Discovery of new molecule suggests origins of life may reside in interstellar space | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Using the ALMA group of radio telescopes, astronomers have discovered a carbon-based molecule with a branched structure – a common feature in molecules that...
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StealthGenie – the app that helps jealous partners and stalkers spy on you and your online conversations

StealthGenie – the app that helps jealous partners and stalkers spy on you and your online conversations | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
There's a shady industry out there of businesses that sell spyware apps that market themselves to jealous partners, domestic abusers and stalkers, keen to spy u
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Three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking device developed

Three-dimensional, continuously multidirectional cloaking device developed | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Two scientists at the University of Rochester have taken invisibility cloaking back to basics. Their novel arrangement of four standard, off-the-shelf lense...
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Science Has Great News for People Who Read Actual Books

Science Has Great News for People Who Read Actual Books | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
It's time to power down your Kindle. (Science Has Great News for People Who Read Actual Books by @RachelSGrate http://t.co/vhEfNbi6cA via @MicNews)
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New evidence of ancient multicellular life sets evolutionary timeline back 60 million years

New evidence of ancient multicellular life sets evolutionary timeline back 60 million years | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

A Virginia Tech geobiologist with collaborators from the Chinese Academy of Sciences have found evidence in the fossil record that complex multicellularity appeared in living things about 600 million years ago – nearly 60 million years before skeletal animals appeared during a huge growth spurt of new life on Earth known as the Cambrian Explosion.

The discovery published online Wednesday in the journal Nature contradicts several longstanding interpretations of multicellular fossils from at least 600 million years ago.

 

"This opens up a new door for us to shine some light on the timing and evolutionary steps that were taken by multicellular organisms that would eventually go on to dominate the Earth in a very visible way," said Shuhai Xiao, a professor of geobiology in the Virginia Tech College of Science. "Fossils similar to these have been interpreted as bacteria, single-cell eukaryotes, algae, and transitional forms related to modern animals such as sponges, sea anemones, or bilaterally symmetrical animals. This paper lets us put aside some of those interpretations."

 

In an effort to determine how, why, and when multicellularity arose from single-celled ancestors, Xiao and his collaborators looked at phosphorite rocks from the Doushantuo Formation in central Guizhou Province of South China, recovering three-dimensionally preserved multicellular fossils that showed signs of cell-to-cell adhesion, differentiation, and programmed cell death—qualities of complex multicellular eukaryotes such as animals and plants.

 

The discovery sheds light on how and when solo cells began to cooperate with other cells to make a single, cohesive life form. The complex multicellularity evident in the fossils is inconsistent with the simpler forms such as bacteria and single-celled life typically expected 600 million years ago.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Artificial intelligence program that learns like a child

Artificial intelligence program that learns like a child | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
An artificial intelligence program created at the University of Gothenburg imitates a child's cognitive development to learn basic arithmetic, logic, and gr...
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Curry spice 'helps brain self-heal'

Curry spice 'helps brain self-heal' | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
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ZEBRA system uses a bracelet to thwart data snoopers

ZEBRA system uses a bracelet to thwart data snoopers | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Computer users may sometimes forget to log off when accessing sensitive data. That's why Dartmouth College computer science student Shrirang Mare is develop...
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MIT's improved all-liquid battery could make renewable energy more competitive

MIT's improved all-liquid battery could make renewable energy more competitive | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Our ability to store energy has proven a big hurdle in the adoption of renewable energies. Researchers from MIT have developed a new battery system with a l...
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'Deadly serious' new tech bug found

'Deadly serious' new tech bug found | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
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'I'm an Atheist': Stephen Hawking on God and Space Travel - NBC News

'I'm an Atheist': Stephen Hawking on God and Space Travel - NBC News | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
World-famous theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking says flat-out that he doesn't believe in God, but he does believe that space travel offers the best hope f...
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Whitelisting: Why and How It Works - eSecurity Planet

Whitelisting: Why and How It Works - eSecurity Planet | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Bad guys continually tweak malware, making it tough for traditional antivirus products to keep up. Whitelisting can help, by allowing only pre-approved applications.
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Star of David: New star-shaped molecule of interlocking rings is the most complex of its kind ever created

Star of David: New star-shaped molecule of interlocking rings is the most complex of its kind ever created | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

Known as a 'Star of David' molecule, scientists have been trying to create one for over a quarter of a century and the team's findings are published in the 21 September 2014 issue of Nature Chemistry.

 

Consisting of two molecular triangles, entwined about each other three times into a hexagram, the structure's interlocked molecules are tiny – each triangle is 114 atoms in length around the perimeter. The molecular triangles are threaded around each other at the same time that the triangles are formed, by a process called 'self-assembly', similar to how the DNA double helix is formed in biology.

 

The molecule was created at The University of Manchester by PhD student Alex Stephens. Professor David Leigh, in Manchester's School of Chemistry, said: "It was a great day when Alex finally got it in the lab. In nature, biology already uses molecular chainmail to make the tough, light shells of certain viruses and now we are on the path towards being able to reproduce its remarkable properties.


"It's the next step on the road to man-made molecular chainmail, which could lead to the development of new materials which are light, flexible and very strong. Just as chainmail was a breakthrough over heavy suits of armour in medieval times, this could be a big step towards materials created using nanotechnology. I hope this will lead to many exciting developments in the future."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The buzz about entomophagy: Is eating insects more than a novelty?

The buzz about entomophagy: Is eating insects more than a novelty? | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Jiminy Cricket may be able to do more than guide our conscience: he, or his kin, may also provide food security solutions for a hungry world. However insect...
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Almaz's story

Almaz's story | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
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Apps to easily encrypt your text messaging and mobile calls

Apps to easily encrypt your text messaging and mobile calls | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Encrypted phone calls and texts are no longer just the domain of the expert or the bad guy. Gizmag looks at free or inexpensive apps designed to secure yo...
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Rescooped by Jeff Morris from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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New study reveals half of Earth's water is older than the Sun | Bec Crew | Science Alert

New study reveals half of Earth's water is older than the Sun | Bec Crew | Science Alert | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

This new finding, led by Ilsedore Cleeves from the University of Michigan in the US, suggests that our water is significantly older than we’d ever imagined, and that water should be plentiful in other planetary systems too.

The discovery was made through the use of new computer simulations, developed by Cleeves and her team, of the early Solar System.

“While we can't go back in time to see the the Sun and Solar System at its formation, the wonderful thing about the vastness of the galaxy is that we can observe many other young Sun-like stars that are currently forming or have recently formed,” Cleeves told Becky Ferreira at Motherboard. "By studying these astrophysical objects using high power telescopes and numerical techniques, we can use this information to model the protoplanetary disk environment in great detail.”

The protoplanetary disk environment is where planets form. Containing large amounts of dust and gas particles that resulted from the collapse of an interstellar star-founding cloud, the protoplanetary disk and the new star next to it will rotate together, and the debris surrounding the disk will form new planets.

Publishing their results in the journal Science today, Cleeves and her team modelled the ‘heavy water’ in ice that was floating in the protoplanetary disk that formed our Solar System. Heavy water contains an isotope of hydrogen called deuterium, and it’s found in all water in the Solar System, including that on planets, icy moons, and inside comets and meteorites.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Complex molecule discovered in space

Complex molecule discovered in space | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
The discovery of a branched carbon molecule 27,000 light-years from Earth suggests the building blocks of life may be ubiquitous throughout the galaxy.
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Rescooped by Jeff Morris from Information Security Tips For Consumers
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"Shellshock", a deadly serious new tech bug, attacking systems as a fast-moving worm virus

"Shellshock", a deadly serious new tech bug,  attacking systems as a fast-moving worm virus | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

Hackers have begun exploiting the newly identified "Shellshock" computer bug, using fast-moving worm viruses to scan for vulnerable systems and then infect them, researchers warned on Thursday.

"Shellshock" is the first major Internet threat to emerge since the discovery in April of "Heartbleed," which affected OpenSSL encryption software that is used in about two-thirds of all web servers, along with hundreds of technology products for consumers and businesses.

"Shellshock" has the potential to wreak more havoc than "Heartbleed" because it enables hackers to gain complete control of an infected machine, which could allow hackers to destroy data, shut down networks or launch attacks on websites, experts said.

The "Heartbleed" bug only allowed them to steal data.

 

For general home users, keep an eye on manufacturer websites for updates - particularly for hardware such as broadband routers as many are based on Linux, which is the target of the new bug.


Via Amigo Omega
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It's outer space, but with filling stations

It's outer space, but with filling stations | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
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ZEBRA system uses a bracelet to thwart data snoopers

ZEBRA system uses a bracelet to thwart data snoopers | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Computer users may sometimes forget to log off when accessing sensitive data. That's why Dartmouth College computer science student Shrirang Mare is develop...
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Tips for securing your data in the cloud

Tips for securing your data in the cloud | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Whether you like it or not, a lot of your data is probably being stored in the cloud. While it is convenient to have your data available from virtually ever...
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Why India's Mars mission is so cheap - and thrilling

Why India's Mars mission is so cheap - and thrilling | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
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Water seen on Neptune-sized planet

Water seen on Neptune-sized planet | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
A cloud-free atmosphere reveals signs of water vapour on HAT-P-11b, the smallest planet beyond our Solar System ever to yield such an insight. (Water seen on Neptune-sized planet...
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Simulation of Yellowstone Supervolcano eruption shows that blast would blanket whole U.S. in ash

Simulation of Yellowstone Supervolcano eruption shows that blast would blanket whole U.S. in ash | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

A new simulation illustrates the explosiveness of the volcano that lurks beneath Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming.

 

Around 640,000 years ago, the volcano blew its top and coated North America with roughly 1,000 cubic kilometers of ash, enough to fill Lake Erie twice over. A simulation of the eruption described August 27, 2014 in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems reveals that a similar outburst today would bury Billings, Mont., in more than a meter (about 40 inches) of volcanic glass shards and pulverized rock. Even New York and Atlanta would receive dustings several millimeters thick as winds whisked ash through the darkened atmosphere for days.

 

Researchers used simulation software called Ash3d that forecasts ash fall by applying global wind patterns to data from historical eruptions. Ash3d churns out results several times faster than previous simulators and is the first program to incorporate the physics of how ash particles clump within a cloud.

 

While geologists say Yellowstone will likely never erupt again, scientists around the world use Ash3d daily to predict the potential fallout from restless volcanoes — including Bárðarbunga, the Icelandic volcano that began erupting in late August.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 24, 4:11 PM

Nice example of developing and using a model to predict future events based on current evidence.