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"Bruise trousers" are designed to let disabled athletes know when they're hurt

"Bruise trousers" are designed to let disabled athletes know when they're hurt | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Along with the obvious mobility issues faced by athletes who are unable to walk, they're also unable to feel their legs, which means they can't always tell ...
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Jeff Morris
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Researcher spots an ATM Skimmer while on vacation in Vienna

Researcher spots an ATM Skimmer while on vacation in Vienna | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Security researcher spotted an ATM Skimmer while on vacation in Vienna
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Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory | The Scientist Magazine®

Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory | The Scientist Magazine® | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Working out is good for the brain. Now, a team of scientists from the U.S. and Germany has a clearer idea why. A protein called cathepsin B, produced and secreted by muscle during exercise, is required for exercise-induced memory improvement and brain cell production in mice, the scientists reported in Cell Metabolism today (June 23). They also showed that levels of cathepsin B are positively correlated with fitness and memory in humans.

“This is a super exciting area. Exercise has so many health benefits, yet we know so little about many of these effects at a molecular level,” said biologist David James of the University of Sydney who did not participate in the work.

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Diesels more polluting below 18C, research suggests - BBC News

Diesels more polluting below 18C, research suggests - BBC News | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Pollution from many popular diesel cars is much worse when it is colder than 18C outside, new research suggests.
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Japan wants to take autonomous construction extraterrestrial

Japan wants to take autonomous construction extraterrestrial | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
​​With an eye on its aging population, Japan is already starting to test the waters with automated construction. Now the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency is aiming to take this technology to a place where there are even less able-bodied workers, the undeveloped plains of the Moon and Mars. ​
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Ransomware that’s 100% pure JavaScript, no download required

Ransomware that’s 100% pure JavaScript, no download required | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
The ransomware wolf in sheep's clothing that consists of pure JavaScript, scrambles your data, and leaves you with a password stealer.
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China builds world's most powerful computer - BBC News

China builds world's most powerful computer - BBC News | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
The 93 petaflop Sunway TaihuLight in China has topped a newly published list of supercomputers.
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'Hack the Pentagon' program reveals 138 security flaws: US

'Hack the Pentagon' program reveals 138 security flaws: US | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Hackers invited by the US government as part of a pilot program to find flaws with five Pentagon websites discovered 138 security vulnerabilities, Defense Secretary Ash Carter said Friday.
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Ultrasound Opens the Blood-Brain Barrier to Promising Drugs in Brain Cancer

Ultrasound Opens the Blood-Brain Barrier to Promising Drugs in Brain Cancer | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it

The protective sheath surrounding the brain’s blood supply—known as the blood-brain barrier—is a safeguard against nasty germs and toxins. But it also prevents existing drugs that could potentially be used to treat brain cancer or Alzheimer’s disease from reaching the brain. That’s why scientists want to unchain the gates of this barrier. Now a new study shows it’s been done in cancer patients.

 

Alexandre Carpentier, a neurosurgeon at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris, used ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier in patients with recurrent glioblastoma—the most common and deadly tumor originating in the adult brain—allowing for delivery of chemotherapy that would otherwise reach the tumor in miniscule amounts. The preliminary results of the early phase clinical trial were reported Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine.

 

The procedure works by first injecting microbubbles into the bloodstream, and then using a device implanted near patients’ tumors to send ultrasonic soundwaves into the brain, exciting the bubbles. The physical pressure of the bubbles pushing on the cells temporarily opens the blood brain barrier, letting an injected drug cross into the brain.

 

“People for years have been trying to open the blood-brain barrier,” said Neal Kassell, founder of the Focused Ultrasound Foundation. The device, called SonoCloud, was implanted and used on 15 patients during monthly chemotherapy administration with no ill effects after six months.

 

Although this is the first published study using ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier in humans, it is not the first study to hit the news. In November, a team at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto announced the start of a clinical trial to open the blood-brain barrier using ultrasound in a single brain cancer patient. Carpentier’s trial, on the other hand, began in July 2014, and Kassell said the French study “is the first time they’ve shown the safety of repetitively opening the blood-brain barrier in humans.” Both clinical trials are ongoing.

 

The Sunnybrook trial used a focused ultrasound device, which is good for pinpointing localized cancers. In contrast, SonoCloud emits ultrasound more diffusely, which is useful for glioblastomas that blend into surrounding brain tissue. “It seems a little more aggressive to implant something,” Carpentier said, but the wider-ranging ultrasound opens a larger swath of the blood-brain barrier. This enables chemotherapy drugs to reach cancer cells around the periphery of the main tumor, hopefully reducing the chance that the cancer will grow back.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Pioneering cancer drug combination approved - BBC News

Pioneering cancer drug combination approved - BBC News | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
A pioneering pair of cancer drugs that unleash the immune system on tumours will be paid for by the NHS in England.
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Malware, data theft, and scams: Researchers expose risks of free livestreaming websites

Malware, data theft, and scams: Researchers expose risks of free livestreaming websites | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Millions of people use free livestreaming websites to watch sports and other live events online, but this comes with a considerable security risk. Researchers from KU Leuven-iMinds and Stony Brook University have found tha
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The primate brain is 'pre-adapted' to face potentially any situation

The primate brain is 'pre-adapted' to face potentially any situation | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Scientists have shown how the brain anticipates all of the new situations that it may encounter in a lifetime by creating a special kind of neural network that is "pre-adapted" to face any eventuality. This emerges from
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Researchers break bandwidth record for data communication using laser-based visible light

Researchers break bandwidth record for data communication using laser-based visible light | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Cell phones and Wi-Fi devices typically transmit data using radio waves, but as the demand for wireless data transfer increases, congestion in the radio spectrum is expected to become more of a problem. One way to solve this problem is with visible light communication (VLC), a technology that uses visible light rather than radio waves for data transmission.

VLC uses lasers or LEDs that look just like traditional lights, but by rapidly switching on and off faster than the eye can see, the light transmits data in binary code to a receiver. Besides expanding the spectrum of data transfer, VLC is expected to have other advantages over wireless radio communication, including faster speeds, higher security, and better energy efficiency.

Currently, however, one of the biggest challenges facing VLC is a very small bandwidth, which greatly limits the speed of data transmission. The main reason for this problem is the small bandwidth of the color converter—a component that converts blue LED light into the different colors needed to make the white light that is ultimately used to transmit data.

In a new paper published in ACS Photonics, a team of researchers led by Osman Bakr and Boon Ooi at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia has developed a new VLC color converter that has a bandwidth that is 40 times greater than that of commercial converters, and more than twice as large as that of any potential candidate converter proposed to date.

"In this work we break the record for data communication using visible light, and more impressively produce white light with a very high color rendering index of 89, by designing a special color converter based on hybrid perovskite nanocrystals," Bakr told Phys.org. "Our work demonstrates white light as both a lighting source and a system for ultra-high-speed data communications."

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How to Hack Someones Facebook Account Just by Knowing their Phone Numbers

How to Hack Someones Facebook Account Just by Knowing their Phone Numbers | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Security Researchers demonstrated that how Signaling System 7 (SS7) flaw allows hackers to Hack Facebook Account Just by Phone Numbers
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Why Great White Sharks Are Still a Mystery to Us

Why Great White Sharks Are Still a Mystery to Us | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Thanks to Jaws, they're the ocean's most iconic and feared fish. But we know surprisingly little about them.
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Mark Zuckerberg masks Mac webcam and microphone - BBC News

Mark Zuckerberg masks Mac webcam and microphone - BBC News | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
A photograph of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg shows tape has been used to cover his MacBook Pro's webcam and mic.
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Over 90 percent of mammals were wiped out by dino-killing asteroid

Over 90 percent of mammals were wiped out by dino-killing asteroid | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
It turns out that dinosaurs might not have been the only casualty of an ancient asteroid strike here on Earth. New analysis of the fossil record indicates that a full 93 percent of mammals living at the time also went extinct, a number significantly higher than previously thought.
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Scammers claim there is a virus in Apple's iTunes database

Scammers claim there is a virus in Apple's iTunes database | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Scammers are once again targeting Apple customers in their attempt to hijack accounts and steal payment information.
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How early mammals evolved night vision to escape dinos - BBC News

How early mammals evolved night vision to escape dinos - BBC News | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Night-time vision evolved millions of years ago in early mammals, a study suggests.
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Lab-grown living bone fuses fast with pig jaw

Lab-grown living bone fuses fast with pig jaw | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
One traditional method of facial bone repair involves sourcing material – generally from a section of the patient's leg – before carving it to the desired shape. Not only does this involve extra surgery and hardship, but results may not always come out perfectly. Development of polymer or hydrogel scaffolding for bone replacement treatments have shown success, although this latest approach from Columbia University exceeds all other achievements.

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Olli, a 3D printed, self-driving minibus, to hit the road in US

Olli, a 3D printed, self-driving minibus, to hit the road in US | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
A new maker of self-driving vehicles burst onto the scene Thursday in partnership with IBM's supercomputer platform Watson, and it's ready to roll right now.

 

The vehicle—a 3D-printed minibus called "Olli" capable of carrying 12 people—was unveiled by Arizona-based startup Local Motors outside the US capital city Washington. Olli was designed as an on-demand transportation solution that passengers can summon with a mobile app, like Uber rides. And it can be "printed" to specification in "micro factories" in a matter of hours.

 

Olli will be demonstrated in National Harbor, Maryland, over the next few months with additional trials expected in Las Vegas and Miami. Local Motors is also in talks to test the vehicles in dozens of cities around the world including Berlin, Copenhagen and Canberra.

 

Even though Google and several automakers see several years of testing before deploying autonomous cars, Local Motors co-founder and chief executive John Rogers said this vehicle is ready to go into service as soon as regulations allow it.

 

"The technology has been ready—fielding it is what has been hard," he said in an interview with AFP. By "fielding," Rogers said Local Motors can design and make the vehicles to specification and offer a service to local governments or other buyers. "Local Motors is about selling (the vehicles) into the markets that are ready now," he said.

 

Rogers said the company has an advantage over other systems because it is building the vehicles from the ground up, and producing most components with 3D printers. "We hope to be able to print this vehicle in about 10 hours and assemble it in another hour," he said. He envisions hundreds of "micro-factories" producing the vehicles around the world.

 

The privately held company with about 45 investors can easily revamp its design based on what a customer wants, and lacks the large infrastructure costs of traditional automakers, according to Rogers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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With 36 security fixes, you should either update Adobe Flash now… or kill it

With 36 security fixes, you should either update Adobe Flash now… or kill it | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Adobe has issued an update for its widely-used Flash Player browser plugin, patching a total of 36 different vulnerabilities.
So will you choose to trash Flash or update it?
Read my article on the Hot for Security blog.
Via Jon Campbell
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Eye-tracking system uses ordinary cellphone camera

Eye-tracking system uses ordinary cellphone camera | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
For the past 40 years, eye-tracking technology—which can determine where in a visual scene people are directing their gaze—has been widely used in psychological experiments and marketing research, but it's required price
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Huge US facial recognition database flawed: audit

Huge US facial recognition database flawed: audit | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
The FBI's facial recognition database has more than 400 million pictures to help its criminal investigations, but lacks adequate safeguards for accuracy and privacy protection, a congressional audit shows.
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Marine life quickly recovered after global mass extinction

Marine life quickly recovered after global mass extinction | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Reptiles rapidly invaded the seas soon after a global extinction wiped out most life on Earth, according to a new study led by University of California, Davis, researchers.
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Researchers break bandwidth record for data communication using laser-based visible light

Researchers break bandwidth record for data communication using laser-based visible light | Jeff Morris | Scoop.it
Cell phones and Wi-Fi devices typically transmit data using radio waves, but as the demand for wireless data transfer increases, congestion in the radio spectrum is expected to become more of a problem. One way to solve this problem is with visible light communication (VLC), a technology that uses visible light rather than radio waves for data transmission.

VLC uses lasers or LEDs that look just like traditional lights, but by rapidly switching on and off faster than the eye can see, the light transmits data in binary code to a receiver. Besides expanding the spectrum of data transfer, VLC is expected to have other advantages over wireless radio communication, including faster speeds, higher security, and better energy efficiency.

Currently, however, one of the biggest challenges facing VLC is a very small bandwidth, which greatly limits the speed of data transmission. The main reason for this problem is the small bandwidth of the color converter—a component that converts blue LED light into the different colors needed to make the white light that is ultimately used to transmit data.

In a new paper published in ACS Photonics, a team of researchers led by Osman Bakr and Boon Ooi at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia has developed a new VLC color converter that has a bandwidth that is 40 times greater than that of commercial converters, and more than twice as large as that of any potential candidate converter proposed to date.

"In this work we break the record for data communication using visible light, and more impressively produce white light with a very high color rendering index of 89, by designing a special color converter based on hybrid perovskite nanocrystals," Bakr told Phys.org. "Our work demonstrates white light as both a lighting source and a system for ultra-high-speed data communications."

Via Mariaschnee
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